Bowhill ('Lady Josephine') Colliery

The opening ceremony at Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday 28th January, 1895, was carried out by Miss Josephine Haig, daughter of Mr. H. V. Haig of Ramornie, who was Chairman of the newly formed Bowhill Coal Company. Bowhill Colliery was located near the Jamphlars area of Auchterderran, just over two miles to the north-east of Lochgelly. This colliery was known as the Josephine when it was first opened. There was a great view of it lying beyond the Minto Pit, Brigghills, from the top of the Eliza Brae, Lochgelly. The colliery was eventually to have three shafts but the No. 3 shaft was never as successful commercially as the Nos. 1, 2 Pits.
The NCB had estimated that the work-force of Bowhill Pit would eventually increase to around about 2900, but this did not come about as first predicted.
The life-span of Bowhill Pit was 66 years and, for most of that time, the wages of the miners working here were always a little higher than in the other Fife coalfields.

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Depth of shafts

No. 1 Pit was 218 fathoms; No. 2 Pit was 166 fathoms; and No. 3 Pit was sinking 1952-1955 to depths of 360-440 fathoms.
[1 fathom = 6 feet]


Colliery opened: 1899 (Nos. 1, 2 shafts)
1952-55 (No. 3 - new sinking)
Colliery closed: 1965
Source Date of Information Supplied
Manager / Under-Manager / Men underground / Men above ground / Coal seams worked
1895 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
February: Formation of the Bowhill Coal Company.
1896 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
David Thomson / ------------ / 49 / 37 / Sinking.
1898 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
David Thomson, Manager, presentation from workmen on his leaving district.
June: Robert Anstruther Muir, appointed general manager.
1899 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
Robert A. Muir, Company Manager.
1900 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Bowman, Manager.
1902 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Bowman / G. Beveridge / 919 / 227 / Manufacturing, gas, household & steam coals.
1904 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Bowman / ------------ / 1110 / 230 / Manufacturing, gas, household & steam coals.
1905 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Bowman / ------------ / 1316 / 260
1908 (Bowhill Coal Co. Ltd.)
Robert Brown / George Beveridge / 1640 / 329
1910 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
March: Mr R. A. Muir, Agent, leaves to take charge of United Collieries Limited.
Jul: Mr Richard Robertson, appointed manager to the Glasgow Coal Company at Carnyle.
Jul: Mr Alexander Barclay, official at the colliery, and for some time manager at Cluny Pit,
appointed district manager to United Collieries, Ltd., Armadale district.
1911 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Mr Wm. Barr / ------------ / 1437 / 312
Feb: Mr William Brown, under-manager in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill,
now manager of the Southrigg Collieries, United Coal Companies.
Sep: Mr James Tripney, oversman No. 2 Pit, appointed manager at Kinglassie Colliery.
1913 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Mr Wm. Barr, colliery manager
Mar: Mr D. Leitch, oversman 10 years at Bowhill Colliery, left. Appointed manager at a Gorebridge colliery.
Mar: Mr Thomas Ness, inspector, No. 1 Pit, left for New Zealand.
May: Mr Wm. Spalding, under manager, No. 2 Pit, for last three years, appointed manager, Donibristle Colliery.
Jul: Mr John Brown, under-manager No. 1 Pit, appointed manager at Kinglassie.
There were 1600 persons employed below ground, and 329 above ground.
1914 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Mr Wm. Barr,colliery manager
Feb: Mr David Black, undermanager No. 2 Pit.
1915 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
June: Departure of Mr Wm. Barr, manager, to Dennyloanhead (Agent).
1916 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Mar: John Brown, colliery manager; John Fulton, under manager.
Neil Anderson Wilkie, colliery manager and district agent.
May: Mr John Suttie, oversman No. 2 Pit, leaves for Preston Links Colliery.
Jun: Mr David Henry, fireman, leaves for Preston Links Colliery.
Dec: Mr David Black, undermanager, No. 2 Pit, leaves for post at Newcastle.
1917 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Jan: Departure of Mr David Simpson, assistant foreman engineer, after 13 years' service.
1918 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
James McFarlane / James Buchanan (No. 1 Pit) : Blyth Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 1268 / 328
1919 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Jun: Departure of James Buchanan, under-manager, No. 1 Pit, for India.
1920 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
James McFarlane / ------------- / 1394 / 404
Aug: Mr Blyth Davidson, undermanager,
appointed manager at Kinglassie Colliery.
1922 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
James McFarlane, manager.
May: Mr Blyth B. Davidson, a former manager at this colliery , promoted from Kinglassie to Leven Colliery
November: Mr Robert Weir appointed manager at Castlecary Brick and Fireclay Works.
1923 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Nov: Mr Thomas T. Thyne appointed manager at Dunnikier Colliery.
1924 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
James McFarlane, manager.
May: Retiral of Mr James Hendrie, agent for the Fife Coal Company at Bowhill Colliery.
June: Mr John Clark, ex-Dysart Collieries, appointed Mr Hendrie's successor.
1926 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
May: Mr Andrew McKnight, (No. 1 Pit) under-manager.
1927 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Clark / Andrew Robb McKnight (No. 1 Pit) : ----------- (No. 2 Pit)
1928 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Clark / William Lawrie (No. 1 Pit) : Charles Lillie (No. 2 Pit) / 1159 / 284
Gas, household, manufacturing, steam and blaes.
Five Feet, Lochgelly Splint and Parrot, Little Splint, Glassee, Duddie Davy and Dunfermline Splint.
1930 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Jul: Mr John Archibald, undermanager, No. 2 Pit.
1932 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Jul: Mr John Archibald, undermanager, No. 2 Pit, appointed manager of Lindsay Colliery.
1937 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Dec: Mr S. McGuire, under-manager.
1938 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
John Clark / S. McGuire (No. 1 Pit No. 1 District) : James Keddie (No. 1 Pit No. 2 District)
Charles Seaman (No. 2 Pit No. 3 District) : John Hunter (No. 2 Pit No. 4 District / 1275 / 296
1939 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Oct: Mr John Clark, manager, appointed manager, Frances Colliery, Dysart.
Mr Andrew B. Sanderson, manager of the Frances Colliery, appointed manager, Bowhill Colliery.
1940 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
May: Mr Wm. Reid, an under-manager, Bowhill, appointed manager at Cowdenbeath No. 7 Colliery,
replacing Mr H. Black who moved to Valleyfield Colliery as manager.
1944 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
May: Mr Thomas Finnie, manager
1945 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
F. Kennedy / William Adams (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 917 / 225
April: Mr John Fleming, ex-manager, Aitken Colliery, joins staff as colliery agent.
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Little Splint and Smithy.
1946 (Fife Coal Co. Ltd.)
Aug: Mr Thomas Duncan, production engineer, appointed colliery manager.
Mr Kennedy, manager, appointed manager at Wellsgreen.
1947 (NCB)
Thomas Duncan / William Adams (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 984 / 222
Gas, household, industrial and steam coals. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Little Splint and Smithy.
Annual output = 311,600 tons
1948 (NCB)
W. Speir / William Adams (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 961 / 239
Household and steam coals. Blairhall, Smithy, Little Splint, Diamond, Lochgelly Splint and Glassee.
1949 (NCB)
W. Speir, Junr. / William Adam (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 911 / 225
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
1950 (NCB)
W. Speir / William Adam (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 1013 / 266
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
1951 (NCB)
W. Speir / William Adam (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 1038 / 260
May: Mr George Marshall, Minto, appointed manager.
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
1952 (NCB)
George Marshall / William Adam (No. 1 Pit) : George Davidson (No. 2 Pit) / 1038 / 260
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
1953/54 (NCB)
G. Marshall / Tom Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : D. Rodden (No. 2 Pit) / 1080 / 276
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
1955 (NCB)
G. Marshall* / T. Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : A. Blake (No. 2 Pit) / 1080 / 276
*Mr George Marshall was actually appointed agent for Dysart area collieries early in 1954.
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
No. 3: Alex. Russell, Manager - new sinking.
1956 (NCB)
W. J. Forbes / T. Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : A. Blake (No. 2 Pit) / 1080 / 276
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Glassee, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
No. 3: W. I. Adam, Manager - new sinking.
1957 (NCB)
W. J. Forbes / T. Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : A. Blake (No. 2 Pit) / 1119 / 238
Household, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Lower Lochgelly, Diamond, Blairhall and Smithy.
No. 3: J. G. Simpson, Manager - new sinking / --- / 5.
1958 (NCB)
Nos. 1, 2: G. Henshilwood / T. Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : A. Blake (No. 2 Pit) / 1205 / 225
Gas, household, industrial and steam coals and Blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Cardenden Smithy and Jersey.
No. 3: W. I. Adam, Manager - new sinking / 19 / 10.
1959 (NCB)
Nos. 1, 2: G. Henshilwood / T. Harrison (No. 1 Pit) : A. Blake (No. 2 Pit) / 1185 / 225
Gas, household, industrial and steam coals and Blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Cardenden Smithy and Jersey.
No. 3: W. I. Adam, Manager - new sinking / 19 / 10.
1961 (NCB)
G. Henshilwood / A. Harrower & A. Bennett / 1090 / 195
Gas, household, industrial, steam and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Little Splint, Cardenden Smithy and Jersey.
1964 (NCB)
G. Henshilwood : A. C. Spence Asst. / F. F. Petrie : A. Bennett / 1160 / 201
Gas, household, industrial, steam coals and blaes. Lochgelly Splint, Little Splint, Cardenden Smithy.


Please see Stories Link:
(1) Bowman Story, for information on John Bowman, early manager of the colliery, and roles played by Bowman family members in Fife's rich mining history.
(2) Memories from Lisa Marie Thomson, USA, the great-granddaughter of David Thomson, manager of Bowhill Pit in 1896.

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The old hamlet of Auchterderran has become completely surrounded by the town of Bowhill, a town which owes its rise and progress to the Bowhill Colliery. The opening of Bowhill Colliery, and extensions at Dundonald, have brought many additions to the house accommodation at Cardenden, and the Cardenden and the Auchterderran Schools of today are spacious buildings, as compared with the structures in which the dominies of the olden time laboured.
The late Mr Hugo Veitch Haig was the first chairman of the Bowhill Coal Company, Limited. Mr Haig presided at the ceremony of cutting the first sod of the two pits at Bowhill. He said that the pits were being sunk without the expense of trial bores. Mr David Adams and Mr Archibald Bowman, two thoroughly practical men, being of opinions that the directors "should risk the job."
The "risk" was a great one, but at 152 fathoms the Jubilee seam was struck; at 170 the Lochgelly splint; at 207 the five feet; and at 220 the Dunfermline splint.
When the flag was hoisted on the pithead frame, intimating that the sinking was accomplished, the directors of Bowhill Coal Company congratulated themselves in the words of the old adage, "all's well that ends well."
House building in the village kept pace with the development underground, and viewed from Cardenden railway station, Bowhill strikes one as being one of the most up-to-date mining villages in the county.
The colliery was, some six years ago, acquired by the Fife Coal Company, Limited, and the agent in charge, under Mr Charles Carlow, the chairman and managing director of the Fife Coal Company, is Mr Neil Wilkie.
In 1913 the pits gave employment to 1600 persons below ground, and 329 above ground. The ramifications of the workings in the pits cover a great area, and on the working "faces" running from the bottom of one of the dooks the men are toiling at least 450 fathoms under the surface.
In 1825, when Mr John Geddes reported on Lochgelly Colliery, the upper seams were drained by a level to the Orr to a depth of 12 fathoms, and a steam engine pumped water from a point 14 fathoms below the level. This meant a total depth of 26 fathoms.
To win coal from a coalfield in which there was a good deal of water at a depth of 26 fathoms was considered a great achievement in these days. What would Mr Geddes think if today he could find himself sitting in the galleries of a seam which is from 400 to 500 fathoms under the surface?

[Extract Dunfermline Press 6 Nov., 1915: Interesting Historical Notes, Parish of Auchterderran]

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Important seams were passed from the commencement of sinking the Josephine in the beginning of 1895:

Name of Seam Thickness Depth
Bower Bank 3 ft. 10 in.   81 fms.
Lower Blairhall 3 ft. 2 in. 111 fms.
Smithy 2 ft. 6 in. 112 fms.
Little Splint 2 ft. 8 in. 123 fms.
Rough Coal 2 ft. 8 in. 126 fms.
Main Coal 2 ft. 3 in. 145 fms.
Jersey or Jubilee (1897) 5 ft. 2 in. 149 fms.
Swallow Drum 2 ft. 11 in. 152 fms.
Craw Coal 2 ft. 3 in. 167 fms.
Lochgelly Splint 4 ft. 10 in. 168 fms.
Lochgelly Parrott 2 ft. 6 in. 171 fms.
Mynheer Coal 1 ft. 4 in. 206 fms.
Five Feet 4 ft. 0 in. 216 fms.
Two Feet, or Dunfermline Splint 3 ft. 9 in. 219 fms.

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Under the lease of January, 1895, the royalties were (though modified in 1900) 4d. per ton on coal and dross up to £1,000 or 60,000 tons, and 3¾d. over that quantity, applying to all coals and dross up to an average pit-selling price of 6s. 9d. per ton. There was a further royalty of one-twelfth of all surplus coal over 6s. 9d., the maximum royalty not exceeding 7d. The dead rent was £450 up to 1906, and £700 per annum for the remainder of the lease, falling into the royalties.
Various other royalties were reserved.

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Bowhill Colliery (19th century report)

Coal seams worked Thickness Quality Class
Duddie Davie 5 ft. 5 in. Poor Steam
Lochgelly Splint 5 ft. Good Good steam
2nd class household
Lochgelly Parrot 2 ft. 6 in. Good Gas
Five Foot 4 ft. Good 2nd class
Dunfermline Splint 4 ft. Excellent Best household

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Information on coals worked at Bowhill Colliery

(based on a report from 1930)

At Bowhill Nos. 1, 2 Pits, where small areas of Dunfermline Splint Coal were wrought near these pits, the coal was rather soft . It varied in thickness from 1 ft. to 6 ft. and contained one or more stone partings. To the east of the Bowhill Pits, a dolerite sill, in several leaves, intruded the Dunfermline Splint and completely destroyed the seam.
The Five Foot Coal here lay between 3 and 4 fathoms above the Splint Coal but there was no trace of the Two Foot Coal which normally lay between these seams. Described as a good steam coal, the Five Foot seam was worked extensively from around 1900 for many decades. In the Bowhill workings the thickness ranged from 3 ft. at Dogton to 5 ft. at Charleston. An average section had 2 ft. of blaes over 3 ft. 10 in. coal set on a pavement of 5 in. of fireclay.
The Upper Five Foot or Jewel Coal was recorded in borings to the west of the pits but it was absent to the east of the Bowhill pits. Where present, it consisted of a thin coal, 4 in. to 9 in. thick, overlain by a rib of ironstone. It was found 5 to 6 fathoms above the Five Foot Coal seam.
In the Pitkinny and Bowhill ground, the Mynheer Coal lay about 9 fathoms above the Five Foot and was separated from it by layers that were mainly sandy. In the Pitcairn farm bore, just west of the pits, where the Mynheer Coal lay at a depth of 231 fathoms, 1 ft. 9 in. of coal was recorded below a 5 in. ironstone. In workings from the Bowhill pits, 2 ft. of coal was proved north of Knobbs, while at Redhouse, 2 ft. 3 in. of coal below a 9 in. ironstone was recorded.
An invasive, variable dolerite sill was responsible for almost completely destroying the overlying Glassee Coal at Pitkinny and Bowhill. In the South Pitkinny bore, the Glassee was described as an 18 in. burnt coal‘ with a 9 in. rib of whinstone in its roof. In journals from Pitcairn farm and Bowhill Pit bores, no coal was recorded at this horizon, and only an 8 in. rib occurred in the Carden farm (1901) bore. However, about half a mile north of the Bowhill pits, there was evidence that the effects of this sill were less marked and that the Glassee seam could be worked. The average thickness near Woodend was about 2 ft. 8 in., while a maximum of 4 ft. 6 in. was met with at Redhouse.
Boring records show that the Lochgelly Splint and Parrot Coals lay close together at Pitkinny and Pitcairn, but were separated by a considerable thickness of sandstone in the southern portion of the Bowhill coalfield. Both coals were worked to some extent and by the early 1930s, a small area of the Parrot had been taken out on the west side of the Bowhill pits, while the Splint had been mined in a wide almost continuous belt from Muirtonhills to Kinglassie Pit. The Lochgelly Parrot Coal varied in thickness from 1 ft. 3 in. to 3 ft. 3 in. and included a variable band of parrot coal in its upper part. Its average thickness at Pitkinny was about 2 ft. 9 in. and at Bowhill 2 ft. 6 in.
The Lochgelly Splint Coal had its maximum development of about 8 ft. 6 in. in the Pitkinny-Pitcairn region but this thinned out to around 2 ft. eastwards towards the Burntisland anticline. In general, it contained a fair percentage of splint coal of good quality. Its pavement was of fireclay or blaes occasionally resting on sandstone; its roof was almost invariably formed of blaes containing one or more thin seams of foul coal, which probably correlated with the Craw Coal of Lochgelly.
The Swallowdrum Coal seam was not recognised in the Pitkinny area. At Bowhill, it was separated from the Lochgelly Splint by 15 fathoms of strata consisting mainly of sandstone but a small quantity was worked at Woodend. About a mile and a half to the east of the pit, the thick sandstone underlying the Swallowdrum seam almost disappeared and the coal lay about 3 fathoms above the Lochgelly Splint. In this ground it was a poor seam containing 10 in. coal resting on 2 ft. 6 in. of coaly fireclay.
The Jersey Coals did not seem to be well developed over the district as a whole. In the South Pitkinny bore, they were represented by two thin coals with a total thickness of 13 in., lying about 14 fathoms above the Lochgelly Splint. They were wrought at Bowhill, on the north side of the River Ore between Ingleshall and Easter Bowhill, under the name Diamond Coal (the same seam as that worked at Cowdenbeath). In No. 1 Pit, where they lay 2½ fathoms above the Swallowdrum, the Lower Jersey Coal, 2 ft. 2 in. thick, was separated by 3 in. stone from the Upper Jersey Coal, which measured 3 ft.
Not a great deal of information is available about the working of the Kelty Main Coal in this area although in No. 1 Pit, 2 ft. 3 in. of coal was recorded, resting on 9 in. of coaly blaes and overlain by fireclay. Where the seam was cut, 6 fathoms above the Diamond in a cross-cut mine at Woodend, a section had coal (6 in.), ironstone (1 in.) on coal (1 ft. 5 in.). Partings of blaes and stone were a feature of the Kelty Main Coal seam at Bowhill and in the eastern area, but thicker seams, around 6 ft., were identified in the west at the South Pitkinny bore.
The Rough Coal at Bowhill was separated from the Kelty Main by 17 fathoms of sandstone. It was composed of two or more thin leaves with variable partings of stone or blaes, and was workable only in small areas. Its best known development was in the ground south and east of the Bowhill Pits.
By the early 1930s, the Little Splint Coal seam was being wrought in small areas from the Bowhill pits where thicknesses from 2 ft. to 3 ft. were encountered. The roof was of blaes or fireclay and the pavement was a thin fireclay resting on sandstone. As the coal was free from partings, it promised to be of considerable value.
Lochgelly Blackband Ironstone was recorded at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, measuring 7 in. and sandwiched between an upper shaly parrot (1 ft.) and 1 ft. 1 in. of coal resting on fireclay. This seam lay 5 to 7 fathoms above the Little Splint.
The Cardenden Smithy Coal, in two rather widely separated leaves, was well developed over the area. It was separated from the Lochgelly Blackband Ironstone by around 5 fathoms of sandstone. The upper leaf of the seam was usually thicker and of better quality than the lower leaf, and was worked in small areas near Auchterderran Parish Church and Woodend. A soft parting was a feature of the lower coal.
At Pitkinny and Pitcairn, where the Blairhall Main Coal was thickest, it measured about 2 ft. including a thin median parting of hard fakes. The coal rested on a thin bed of fireclay or blaes underlain by sandstone, and it was succeeded by a thick post of fireclay containing ironstone balls or bands near its top. East of the Bowhill pits, the Blairhall Coal was not recorded in any boring.
The Bowesbank Coal lay 6 to 20 fathoms above the Index Limestone of the Upper Limestone Group and was variable in thickness and in quality. In the Cowdenbeath-Lochore syncline, where it rested on a thin bed of fireclay and was overlain by fakes or faky blaes, the coal generally exceeded 2 ft. and may have reached 3 ft. 9 in. It was variously described in bores as foul coal, parrot coal and splint coal. In Bowhill Pit, the seam was 3 ft. thick but it appeared to thin out quickly to the east.
The Lochore Parrot and Ironstone was separated from the Bowesbank seam by 7 to 9 fathoms of sediments that included a fairly thick post of sandstone and several thin coals. The seam was very thin over the Bowhill basin, only 6 in. of coal being recorded in the pit section.
A new No. 3 shaft was sunk in late 1952 but it never succeeded in helping the Bowhill Colliery reach its planned, increased target of coal production and was worked for a few years only before the whole Colliery closed in 1965.

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Plans of Abandoned Seams for Bowhill Pits or Mines designated in Plans
COAL; Glassee; Mynheer (1923) Bowhill Nos. 1, 2
COAL; Blairhall Smithy (July, 1931) Bowhill Nos. 1, 2
COAL; Little Splint (February, 1932) Bowhill Nos. 1, 2
Later workings have been added to the plan of the Mynheer seam.
The amended abandonment date in respect of this seam is December, 1935.
Bowhill Nos. 1, 2
(Plan No. 8676)

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
23 January, 1895

NEW PIT. - The site of the Bowhill Company's new pits is already well covered with bricks and material for an immediate commencement of work. On Monday first a large company is to assemble at the back of Balgonie House to see a young lady name the pit, and cut the first sod with a silver spade. Afterwards there is to be a cake and wine banquet in the schoolroom.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
30 January, 1895
INTERESTING CEREMONY AT BOWHILL

On Monday an interesting ceremony was performed in a field at Auchterderran. This was the lifting of the first sod of a coal pit about to be sunk by the Bowhill Coal Company. A large number of people were present to witness the ceremony. A wooden tripod was erected, and the necessary apparatus appended for the lifting of the sod. This act was gracefully accomplished by Miss Josephine Haig, and the pit was formally named "Josephine."
The young lady was then presented with the beautiful silver spade, with which she performed the ceremony. Mr Adams, one of the directors, who presented it, said they needn't expect the pit to be ready in a month or two, but that it would be something like two years before it was a productive colliery. But he had no doubt, with the well-known business ability of its directors, and by steady perseverance, it would be a success. (Applause.)
Mr D. Thomson called for three cheers for Miss Haig, which were heartily given. Mr H. Haig thanked them on behalf of his daughter for the honour they had conferred on her.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
2 February, 1895
NEW COAL COMPANY IN FIFE

The Bowhill Coal Company, with a capital of £100,000 was recently floated in Fife with a view of working the minerals on the estate of Wallsgreen, near Cardenden Railway Station. The estate of Wallsgreen, minerals, and lands have been purchased by the Company, and on Monday the first sod of two pits was cut by Miss Josephine Haig, daughter of Mr H. V. Haig, chairman of the Company, in the presence of a large assemblage of people, including the Directors and shareholders of the Company. ...
[The silver spade for the sod-cutting was supplied by Thomson Brothers, Kirkcaldy.]

DESCRIPTION OF THE COALFIELD

All the coal seams known to the Dunfermline district are lying untouched on the estate, although they have been worked in the immediate neighbourhood for the last fifty years by the Lochgelly and other companies.
There are at least nine workable seams of coal in the district - the smithy coal, the little splint, the fourteen feet, the Duddie Davie, the Lochgelly splint, the glass coal, the Mynheer, the five feet, and the Dunfermline splint.
The Dunfermline splint lies at a depth of 220 fathoms. Meantime, it is the intention of the Company to sink the two shafts to the Lochgelly splint, a depth of 170 fathoms.
The main or pumping shaft is to be 27 ft. by 11 ft., and the second shaft will be 18 ft. by 11 ft. The machinery for the two pits has all been contracted for, and will be of the most approved type. A direct acting pumping engine is to be erected on the large pit. The cylinder will be 100 in. in diameter, and the pumps in the pit will be 30 in.
The quantities of water raised per minute will be at least 1400 gallons. Coupled winding engines, with 30 in. diameter cylinders, are to be erected on both pits. The winding engines are to be capable of raising at least 300,000 tons of coal per annum.
Arrangements have been made for connecting the works with the North British Railway Company's Dunfermline and Thornton branch.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
6 February, 1895

BOWHILL COAL Co. - Rapid progress is being made with the sinking of the new pits. A fine portable steam crane has been erected, which will from its position between the two shafts draw up large quantities of excavation. No expense is being spared to make these pits the finest in the kingdom. The old workmen have commenced to occupy the houses at Denend and Jamphlars.

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"The Scotsman"
9 February, 1895

FLOODING OF A FIFE PIT. - Owing to a large and growing accumulation of water in the workings, it has been found necessary to suspend operations at one of the pits at Dundonald Colliery, Fifeshire. The neighbouring colliery of Denend was closed at the time of the miners' strike, and it is believed that the stoppage of pumping operations there has led to the increase of the flow of water at Dundonald. In view of the fact that heavy pumping machinery is to be fitted up at the "Josephine" Pit, in course of being sunk by the Bowhill Company, it is expected that the stoppage at the Dundonald Pit will only be temporary, but a considerable time must elapse before the water finds its way into the Bowhill workings.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
6 March, 1895

FRESH FIELDS. - The Bowhill Coal Coy., have taken Harestanes and Redhouse Minerals. New families are entering the Parish every week. The work is going on briskly at the "Josephine" pit, and without a hitch.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
11 March, 1895

JOSEPHINE PIT. - The steel pit-head frames have arrived and will be erected soon. The masons have been very quick in getting up shops. An engine is being placed at the side of the Derran to pump fresh water. The whole scene is full of life and stir.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
10 April, 1895

BOWHILL. - The first of the two great pithead frames has been almost completed. It is made of substantial steel, and is already quite a landmark, not at all an objectionable one.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
3 July, 1895

BOWHILL. - The large stalk is now complete, and great progress is being made with the winding machinery. The stalk has reached a height of 157 feet.

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"Supplement: Dunfermline Saturday Press"
6 June, 1896

In one of the shafts at Bowhill Colliery, Lochgelly, a sinker, named John Greig, was seriously injured on Saturday. Greig had been engaged on a plank of wood, about 5 fathoms up the shaft, when one of the ascending kettles struck the plank, and the poor fellow was precipitated to the bottom. Greig sustained a fracture of the right leg, a fracture of the lower jawbone, and other injuries.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
10 June, 1896
FATAL ACCIDENT

A distressing accident occurred at Bowhill Pit on Monday morning last, resulting in the death of Henry Swan (19), son of George Swan, pit sinker. Swan has for some time been assisting in various duties on the pit head, and had been requested to assist in putting right a large fly wheel. While leaning carelessly against the wheel someone shouted to the engineman to put on steam. He unfortunately did so, with the result that the wheel went off with a bound, taking Swan down with it. His head was severely crushed, and he died soon afterwards resting on his father's arm.
Needless to say, the affair cast a gloom over the neighbourhood. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents, who are widely known, and highly respected.
The Funeral:- In view of the deceased being a volunteer, and belonging to a family who have all along taken an active interest in the volunteer force, the officers of the L Company, 6th V.B.R.H., wisely decided to invite the members of the Company to attend the funeral. The Company will accordingly parade at the Drill Hall, Lochgelly, in church parade uniform, at 2.45 this afternoon, and it is to be hoped they will assemble in large numbers to pay this last tribute to their dead comrade.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
13 June, 1896
ANOTHER FATAL PIT-SINKING ACCIDENT

A pit-sinking fatality occurred at Bowhill Colliery on Monday morning. Henry Swan, nineteen years of age, son of George Swan, pit-sinker, Auchterderran, was starting a pumping engine when he got entangled among the machinery and was struck by the flywheel, sustaining such injuries that he died almost immediately.

[The issue of 27 June, 1896, carried a Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of Henry Swan. Among those giving evidence were:- David Thomson, manager, Bowhill; and, Richard Yardley, engineman, Josephine Pit.
The issue of 24 October carried the sad news that George Swan, the pursuer and father of the victim - Henry Swan, had died, and that the case was delayed for a fortnight to see whether his widow, as his executrix under his will, should sist herself as pursuer in the case.
]

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
5 December, 1896
ACTION OF DAMAGES

In the Court of Session on Tuesday, the Judges of the Second Division ordered issues for jury trial of an action raised by Margaret Anderson or Swan, wife of the now deceased George Swan, pit-sinker, Jamphlars, Auchterderran, Fife, against the Bowhill Coal Company, Limited, Cardenden, Fife. Pursuers seek £500 damages in respect of the death of her son, Henry Swan. ...

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
Wednesday, 9 June, 1897
NEW MINING VENTURES IN FIFE

... At Cardenden the Bowhill Coal Company is vigorously proceeding with the sinking of one of the largest pits in the country. The fittings are of the most modern description. Several seams of coal have been reached, which, it is believed, will secure the success of the new venture. Some of the most valued seams are yet to be reached, but they are at a great depth. For some years the mining industry of Cardenden has been at a low ebb, but when once the new undertaking is developed employment will be given to a greater number of miners and others than was ever done before. ...

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
Wednesday, 14 July, 1897

The Bowhill Coal Company has struck by a bore the Lochgelly Splint. It is 6 ft. 3 in. thick. The second lift is now being placed, and is being put in with great speed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 June, 1898

This issue carried the news that Mr Robert A. Muir, formerly of Kelty Colliery, was now general manager to the Bowhill Coal Company.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 September, 1898

John Swan, miner, Denend, was engaged setting a prop in the splint seam of the Josephine Pit, No. 2 Bowhill Colliery, on Monday, when a piece of stone and coal fell upon his right leg, fracturing it at two places below the knee.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 October, 1898
COAL MINING AT AUCHTERDERRAN GLEBE

At Kirkcaldy Established Presbytery on Wednesday, Mr Macindoe, solicitor, on behalf of the minister of Auchterderran parish, produced a draught lease between the Rev. Mr Houston and others and the Bowhill Coal Company (Limited), for the working of the coal at the western part of the Auchterderran glebe. He stated that the part where the coal was to be leased was at such a distance from the church and manse buildings that there was no possibility of any damage being done to them by the workings. The lease was for thirty-one years from Martinmas 1898, and there was a fixed rent of £12, 10s., while the ruling lordship was 4d. per ton from common coal. The other lordships were the same as agreed to by the same proprietors in the same mineral field. The extent to be leased was seven acres out of twenty-one acres. The Presbytery, after discussion, agreed to the lease, and the moderator and clerk were authorised to sign the same.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 December, 1898

Mr Wm. Simpson, for the last nine years Chief Engineer at the Hill of Beath Works of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, has been appointed to a similar situation in the service of the Bowhill Coal Company, Fife, Limited, Cardenden.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 January, 1899

Mr William Simpson, chief engineer at the Hill of Beath Works of the Fife Coal Company for the last eight years, has been presented with a pair of gold-mounted eye-glasses, a silver-mounted walking-stick, and a gold brooch for Mrs Simpson, on the occasion of his leaving to fill the position of chief engineer at Bowhill Collieries, Cardenden.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 April, 1899
MINING CLASS

Some of the students attending the mining class, accompanied by Mr George Henderson, their teacher, on Saturday visited the works of the Bowhill Coal Coy., Ltd., Cardenden.
Mr R. A. Muir, the Company's manager, showed the company round the magnificent appointments of the colliery. It would be difficult to find a more courteous and genial guide and instructor than Mr Muir. He showed the visitors the different points and working of the whole gigantic fit-up - the steam generating by Lane-type boilers, the powerful pumping engine, the sweet-working winding engines, the ventilating apparatus, the coal sorting and loading, which were all graphically explained. The company then went down the pit, and into the workings of one of the coal seams. On coming to daylight again, Mr Henderson, in a few words, thanked Mr Muir, in name of the company, for his kindness, courtesy, and instructive remarks while showing them round, and jocularly remarked that if he had not succeeded as a colliery manager he would have made a splendid teacher.
He called for a hearty vote of thanks, which was widely accorded by the company again singing - "For he's a jolly good fellow." Mr Muir, in reply, pointed out the great importance of mining, and the fact of Britain's coal and iron being her "backbone". He encouraged the students to be earnest, diligent, and hard working. If they meant to get on they must burn "midnight oil", as all who wished success must do. Hard work and perseverance must be brought into play if success was to be attained. A very good rendering he gave of the old couplet - "If at first you don't succeed - fail again!" Train time called the company off, after a most instructive and enjoyable day.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 October, 1899

James Smith, miner, Church Street, Lochgelly, was fatally injured on Monday in the underground workings of the Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was filling redd at the coal face, when a quantity of coal and redd suddenly fell from the face upon him. He was knocked up against the hutch, and in addition to being bruised about the chest and lower part of the body, he sustained a shock to the nervous system. He succumbed to his injuries on Wednesday morning. Deceased was twenty-five years of age. He was married.


"Dunfermline Press"
23 December, 1899

David Black, miner, Westfield, Auchterderran, was killed while at work on Thursday, at the bottom of No. 1 shaft, Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Deceased was holing coal, when a fall from the roof took place, killing him on the spot. He was about 37 years of age, was married, and leaves a widow and family.

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"Lochgelly Times"
27 December, 1899

David Black, Westfield Row (37), was killed at Bowhill Pit. Dr Rorie was called. Deceased was a well-known dog and poultry fancier.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 January, 1900

This issue carried the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of David Black on 21 December. Those giving evidence included:- Robert A. Muir, colliery manager; David Addie, pit sinker, Cardenden; David Swan, pit sinker, Lochgelly; and William Paterson, miner, Westfield Rows. The Jury returned a formal verdict.


"Dunfermline Press"
21 April, 1900

PIT FLOODED AT BOWHILL
ONE MAN DROWNED : THREE INJURED

An accident of a very alarming nature occurred at Bowhill Colliery on Monday - one man losing his life and three others being injured. Four men, named Con O'Donnell, pit sinker, Lochgelly; Alexander Herd, miner, Charleston, parish of Auchterderran; George Bonnar, pumping engineman, South Walkerton, parish of Kinglassie; and James McColl, pit sinker, were employed in a dook in the Lochgelly splint seam in the Josephine Pit. Two dooks had been run parallel with each other in the same seam, and the four men were engaged in the work of making a connection between the roads. One of the roads had been standing for some time, and, being run to the dip, some water had collected in it.
The partition seems to have been thinner on Monday than the men expected, and while they were at work the water burst through upon them. The volume of water was considerable, but fortunately it took some little time to rise. O'Donnell and Herd were at the extreme end of No. 1 Dook, and although a warning cry was given, they did not seem to hear it, with the result that the two men were soon hemmed in by the running water. McColl, after being immersed for three quarters of an hour, managed to force his way through, but the other, O'Donnell, was drowned. The two other men were severely injured through being struck by material thrown about by the burst - Herd being badly hurt about the head, and George Bonnar, who was working the dook pumping engine, having sustained two severe scalp wounds and also a shock to the system.
When the burst took place the lights of the men were extinguished, and in the darkness the men were unable to assist one another. The deceased sinker, O'Donnell, resided in Brewery Court, Lochgelly, was 35 years of age, and unmarried. His body was not recovered till five o'clock in the afternoon, having been in the water for nearly ten hours. Dr Rorie, who was called when the accident happened, descended the shaft, and, after attending to the other men's injuries, remained in the pit for a time in the hope of O'Donnell being extricated and resuscitation attempted. Mr Muir, manager, was in the pit at the time, and did everything possible under the circumstances.

A GRAPHIC NARRATIVE.

James McColl, interviewed regarding the occurrence, made the following statement:-
About 7 A.M. I was working on dook No. 1 along with Con O'Donnell. We heard a cry, but we thought it was just a hutch run away in the dook. We both stood close up to the side, thinking to let it pass, but instead of the hutch we saw water coming. We made to get out, but the onrush of water was too strong for us to make headway against it. I caught hold of an air pipe, but it broke. When the water had stopped running, I made another attempt to get through it. Con had hold of my arm, but something struck him and forced him to let go his hold, and he disappeared. I called his name several times, but failed to get an answer. I felt through the water for him with my feet, but could not find him. When I could not find him I tried again to get through, but failed. The water was right up to the roof, and I could get no air. I tried five times altogether. Ultimately I made a desperate rush through twenty or thirty feet of water. When I got that length I met Mr Muir, the manager, who assisted me out of danger. He asked me where Con was, and I replied that I thought he was drowned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 May, 1900

This issue carried the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of Cornelius O'Donnell, pit sinker, at Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence at the inquiry, held in Dunfermline, included:- Robert Anstruther Muir, colliery manager; George Beveridge, under-ground manager; James Hudson McCall, pit sinker; Alexander Herd; Alexander Beveridge; George Bonnar; and, David Briggs.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 September, 1900

James Gibson, miner, Leslie, while working in the Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Friday last, had his right leg broken through a stone falling upon it from the side of the roadway. He was attended to by Dr Rorie, Auchterderran.

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MISCELLANEOUS
"Auchterderran of Yesteryear"

A volume of "Auchterderran of Yesteryear" shows Bowhill Pit as belonging to Bowhill Coal Company and the only miners rows are 1st to 7th Streets behind West Cottages, Bowhill. 8th to 19th Streets were built later on the east side of Cemetery Brae and Station Road, Bowhill. These numbered streets were actually the notion of an early manager at Bowhill Colliery who had worked in the U.S.A.
The uncle of Ian Cameron (Dalgety Bay) - John Cameron, his father's oldest brother, came to Fife from Arbroath around this time and, as a joiner, he worked at the building of the miners rows at Bowhill. Apparently, they were built at a cost of roughly £100 per house!
This same source also identifies the colliery near Cardenden Railway Station called Denend, close to the site of the present-day Denend School. The land belonged to R. C. Munro Ferguson of Raith (later Lord Novar) who owned the mineral rights in the Cluny area also. The Ferguson family constructed several "coal roads" to their pits in the Cluny area.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 January, 1901

Two accidents involving the death of three workmen have occurred at the Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery, wrought by the Bowhill Coal Company, Limited. On Saturday last John Chalmers, aged 33 years, an engineman, residing at Balgonie Buildings, Bowhill, was engaged in putting a belt on a wheel at the "shakers". His head came in contact with a girder, and losing his balance he fell from the scaffold, a distance of 16 feet, and alighted on a rail. Although, as it turned out, he was fatally injured, he showed wonderful grit and endurance, and refusing all assistance he managed to walk home. Dr Rorie was immediately summoned. On examination, it was found that Chalmers' right arm was dislocated at the elbow, and that he also received severe internal injuries. The injured man succumbed to his injuries at half-past seven o'clock the same evening. Deceased was a quiet, steady man, and much liked and respected by his fellow workmen. He belonged to Lochgelly, where his people reside, and where he was very well known. He leaves a widow and three young children.

The second accident occurred on Wednesday, and it resulted, we regret to say, in the loss of two lives. At about four o'clock in the afternoon, a terrific crack was heard by the men working in the Josephine Pit, and it was soon ascertained that a large part of the roof had fallen. The fall took place where a wheel brae worker, named James Black, who resided at Kinglassie, was known to be working. Operations were at once commenced for removing the mass of stone - said to weigh from ten to twelve tons - and Black's body was found firmly wedged in with pieces of wood. It was nor without a good deal of difficulty that the body was brought out. Anxiety soon began to be felt about a pit inspector named Robert Hamilton, Bowhill Cottages. The men had only a suspicion that he might be under the debris, but this suspicion was enough to make them redouble their efforts in removing the fallen material, and shortly after six o'clock Hamilton's body was discovered. Hamilton, when struck by the fall, had evidently been in a sitting posture. The bodies were afterwards examined by Dr Rorie and Dr Black. In both cases death had apparently been instantaneous.
Following so shortly on Saturday's fatality to the engineman Chalmers, a painful sensation was caused in the district when the news became known, and the men below stopped working, and were drawn to the pithead.
Hamilton was thirty-seven years of age, and Black forty years. Both men were married, and each leaves a widow and young family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 February, 1901

This issue carried Reports of the Fatal Accident Inquiries into the deaths of John Chalmers, engineman; James Black, miner, and Robert Hamilton, pit inspector, all Bowhill Colliery. The manager, Mr R. A. Muir, gave evidence in the Chalmers case where a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.
The Jury returned a formal verdict in the deaths of Black and Hamilton when those giving evidence included:- Mr R. A. Muir, manager; Matthew Donaldson, brusher; John Keddie, pit inspector; and James Webster, pit inspector.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 February, 1901

James Slaven, miner, Denend, met with an accident in the Josephine Pit, Bowhill, on Wednesday afternoon. He was hewing at the face when a prop slipped, and a piece of coal, weighing about six cwt. came away, and, falling upon his right leg, caused a fracture below the knee. He was attended to by Dr Rorie, Cardenden.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 June, 1901

While working in the Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Thursday morning, James Gilchrist, a miner, residing at Bowhill, met with an unfortunate accident, caused by an unexpected fall of coal, whereby the little finger of his left hand was completely severed, and the hand otherwise injured. The unfortunate man was attended to at his home by Drs Rorie and Black.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 October, 1901

William Rankine, junior, miner, No. 23 Fifth Street, Bowhill, was fatally injured on Monday in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was engaged at brushing work near the face in the five-feet seam of the west section of the pit when a stone weighing about ten cwts fell from the side, knocking him down and crushing him against a hutch. He sustained severe internal injuries and was rendered unconscious, and died the following morning. Deceased was seventeen years of age.

See Fatal accident inquiry, below.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 October, 1901

David Ross, a pony driver, residing at Balgonie Cottages, Auchterderran, sustained a fracture of one of his legs on Saturday in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Ross was pushing two hutches in front of him, and a lad was following with a single hutch. The hutch which was following struck against Ross, causing a compound fracture of his right leg a little above the ankle.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 October, 1901

On Wednesday, a serious accident occurred in the Josephine No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. While Alexander Wildridge, sen., miner, residing at Rosbine Cottage, Lochgelly, was in the act of adjusting the chain on a wheel on one of the wheel braes in the Jubilee Seam, the wheel was set in motion, and Wildridge's left hand was drawn into the revolving wheel, crushing and cutting it in a fearful manner. The unfortunate man was medically attended to at the colliery by Dr Rorie and conveyed to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital in the ambulance van. On arriving there it was found necessary to amputate the fingers of the injured hand.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 November, 1901

At the Fatal Accident Inquiry in Dunfermline Sheriff Court, on Thursday, under Sheriff Gillespie, the jury returned a formal verdict on the death of William Rankine, junior, miner, Bowhill, who was injured in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, but died the following day. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- John Bowman, colliery manager; John Duncan, miner, 1 Balgonie Cottages, Jamphlars; James Yunson, chain runner, 28 Main Street, Lochgelly; Angus Hugh, contractor brusher, 8 Main Street, Lochgelly; and Andrew Barclay, pit inspector, Capledrae Rows, Lochgelly.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 November, 1901

Benjamin Ireland (36), tramp miner or labourer, was found dead on a bing of ashes near the pumping engines at Bowhill Colliery, on Sunday. The man had his jacket wrapped round his head as if he had lain down on the bing the previous night to sleep. There were marks of slight burning about the body, but it is supposed that death was due to suffocation, caused by fumes from smouldering ashes.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 May, 1902

Early on Saturday forenoon, George Innes (75), foreman pitheadman, residing at Denend, was descending a wooden stair at No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, when the stair gave way and he fell to the ground, a distance of seven-and-a-half feet. Two of his ribs were broken and his collar bone was fractured.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 June, 1902

Andrew Baird, pony driver, 3 Grainger Street, Lochgelly, sustained a fracture of the skull while he was at work on Friday last in No. 1 Josephine Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was coupling a race of hutches when another race came up, jamming his head between the two sets of vehicles.

See Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, dated 24th September, 1904 below.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 October, 1902

Alexander Ritchie, miner, 2 Bowhill Cottages, met with a peculiar accident on Friday last. He was engaged driving a mine at Bowhill Colliery, and was in the act of explaining to a friend the working of an electric battery, when the charge exploded with the result that Ritchie was rather seriously injured.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 November, 1902

What might have proved a more serious accident occurred at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Wednesday. While a number of men were descending the shaft the cage struck the bottom with considerable force. One of them - James Murdoch, miner, Tenth Street, Bowhill - was thrown down and rendered unconscious. He was afterwards found to be suffering from shock and concussion of the brain. His companions escaped without injury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 November, 1902

John Fisher, miner, Jessamine Cottages, Auchterderran, had two of his ribs broken on Wednesday through a piece of coal falling from the roof upon him while he was at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 June, 1903

At a recent examination in mining held in Edinburgh, the following pupils - all officials at Bowhill Colliery - obtained first-class certificates - Messrs William Barclay, Thomas Welsh, George Beveridge, and Robert Brown. William Brown passed the examination entitling him to a second-class certificate.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 August, 1903

While engaged in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday, James Innes, miner, residing in Bowhill, was seriously injured by a fall of fireclay and stone from the roof. Dr Dalgleish, who was summoned, found the man suffering from severe bruises on the back and right thigh. The doctor ordered his removal to Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 August, 1903

David Nairn, forty years of age, an underground fireman, residing in Bowhill, was fatally injured at nine o'clock on Monday morning in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was repairing a roof at the foot of a wheel brae, when he was knocked down by a race of hutches. He was hurt internally. On his being conveyed home, he was attended to by Dr Rorie, but succumbed to his injuries at three o'clock in the afternoon.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 September, 1903

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Wednesday - before Sheriff Gillespie and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Nairn, pit inspector, Bowhill. Those giving evidence included:- John Bowman, manager; Andrew Watters, miner; Robert Doig, drawer, 17 Pottery Street, Kirkcaldy; William Robertson, drawer or wheeler, 27 Third Street, Bowhill; and James Swan, pit worker, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 September, 1903

While engaged drawing hutches on a wheelbrae in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday, Francis Dick, drawer, residing in Bowhill was badly crushed by a full hutch accidentally coming against him. He was attended to by Dr Rorie, Cardenden.

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26 September, 1903

Robert Small, miner, Earl's Hall, Auchterderran, had his left leg fractured in two places last week in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, about a ton and a half of coal bursting from the face where he was at work.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 October, 1903

A miner named John Beveridge, residing at Balgonie Terrace, was seriously injured early on Monday at Bowhill Pit, belonging to the Bowhill Coal Company, Limited. Beveridge was working at the coal face when a fall from the roof occurred. He was extricated with difficulty, and when medically attended to, it was found that one of his legs was badly fractured, and that he was otherwise injured. The colliery has been remarkably free from accidents.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 October, 1903

Joseph Beveridge, roadsman, Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, was employed in No. 1 dook of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday, when a large stone fell upon him from the roof, fracturing his right leg.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 November, 1903

We understand that the Bowhill Coal Company have secured a very large order for their famous Bowhill navigation steam coal with a fast Atlantic line of steamships.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 January, 1904

The Earl of Tankerville and party visited Bowhill Colliery, Cardenden, on Thursday, and made an inspection both above and below ground.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 March, 1904

Recently the Directors of Bowhill Colliery Company fitted up at their works an ambulance house, equipped with stretchers, an ambulance litter, and other appliances for "first aid" treatment of men sustaining injuries in their employment. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 March, 1904

Charles Taylor, thirty-six years of age, Haulageman, residing at Jamphlars, Auchterderran, died on Thursday as the result of injuries received the previous day in the west dook of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. While he was riding on the first of two loaded hutches, the vehicles went off the rails, and he was jammed against a pit prop, and was severely crushed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 April, 1904

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Tuesday - before Sheriff Gillespie and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a haulageman named Charles Taylor, residing at Jamphlars, who was injured 10 March in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence included:- William McQuiston, Seventh Street, Bowhill; William Spence, pit brusher, Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran; Robert Brown, oversman, the Cottages, Bowhill; James Thomson, haulage engineman, Launcherhead, Lochgelly; and Richard Yarley, a brother-in-law of Taylor. The Jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 August, 1904

Alexander Herd, miner, Coupour, Auchterderran, was employed at the face in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday, when a piece of redd fell from the roof upon him, fracturing his right thigh.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 September, 1904

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Andrew Baird, pit drawer, 3 Melville Street, Lochgelly, who was fatally injured on 20 June 1902, in No. 1 Josephine Pit, Bowhill, through his head being squeezed between two loaded hutches, and who died on 4th August 1904, as the result of the accident.
Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- David McKenzie, pony driver, Dundas Street, Lochgelly; Thomas Scott, miner, Rosslyn Street, Gallatown, Kirkcaldy; Robert Brown, oversman, No. 1 Third Street, Bowhill; and Isabella Baird or Guy, wife of John Guy, miner, Melville Street, Lochgelly, the sister of Andrew Baird. A formal verdict was returned by the Jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 January, 1905

An explosion of gas occurred on Saturday in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by which John Brand and his son Robert were injured - the latter fatally. The son was severely burned about the face, arms, and hands, and the father, in addition to burning injuries, received a severe scalp wound. The two men were conveyed to Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital, where Robert died on Monday night.

Footnote
See Fatal Accidents Inquiry on 4 February, 1905 below.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 February, 1905

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Robert Brand, Cardenden, who, in Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital on 2nd January, succumbed to injuries sustained by an explosion of inflammable gas in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, on the last day of 1904. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Robert Brown, oversman; John Brand, miner, Cardenden (father of deceased); William Veale, miner, Lady Campbell's Walk; James Simpson, pit inspector; and Alexander Barclay, inspector. A formal verdict was returned by the Jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 February, 1905

A miner named James Barclay had his leg broken while working in Bowhill Colliery on Thursday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 March, 1905

THE RECENT EXPLOSION AT BOWHILL
CHARGE AGAINST PIT INSPECTOR

A sequel to the recent explosion in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by which a miner received injuries which terminated fatally, was heard in Dunfermline Sheriff Court on Thursday, when Alexander Barclay, fireman or pit inspector, residing at 10 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, was charged with a contravention of the Coal Mines Regulation Act. ... The Sheriff did not think the case was one of carelessness, and he imposed a modified penalty of 5s.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 May, 1905

Robert Christie, miner, High Street, Lochgelly, was injured in the underground workings at Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday by a fall from the roof. His injuries consisted of three broken ribs, the material which came away striking him on the right side and back. Christie was conveyed to his home in the colliery ambulance waggon.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 June, 1905

In a wheel-brae in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday morning, Andrew Vanbreak, miner, Low Row, Denend, was suddenly thrown backwards by a loaded hutch. He sustained injuries consisting of a compound fracture of the right arm, a fracture of the right shoulder blade, and two broken ribs.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 June, 1905

The Bowhill Coal Company are introducing a new electric power installation at their colliery and also intend to light the village of Bowhill by means of electricity.
At the colliery, which is one of the largest in the country, turning out an average of 2000 tons per day, the magnificent equipment, hall-marked with the ingenuity of the manager, Mr R. A. Muir, is ever being improved, and the latest inception is an electric power installation on a much more extensive scale that that prevailing.
Steam is all very well for the working of an engine, say, at the pit bottom, but when the pipes from the boilers have to be taken round corners and along roads the power is minimised, so much so in some cases as to be of practically little value.
Electricity, on the other hand, can be used at will, and applied to fullest advantage in any part of the workings, and this fact has been grasped by the enterprising gentlemen forming the Bowhill Coal Company.
A commodious engine-house has been completed, and the machinery is being fitted up; the probability is that the current will be turned on within a fortnight. The engine is a very powerful one - slow speed, compound, high pressure and low pressure cylinders, of 500 horse-power, and with 90 revolutions per minute.
The h.p. cylinder is 22½ inches, and the l.p. cylinder 33 inches, while the stroke is 42 inches. The engine drives a 3-phase alternator, which generates the power by 14 ropes instead of belting. The latter machine is of 600 h.p., and is by Bruce, Peebles, & Company, Edinburgh. The utilisation of the power will be wholly underground, and the small plant in use at the moment will form a very reliable stand-by.
The scheme of lighting is also an important one. A thoroughly up-to-date and powerful lighting plant is on order, and it is proposed to illumine the spacious pit bottom with electricity, and also the streets of Bowhill.
Bowhill, it may be mentioned, is the first pit in Fife to put electricity to such extensive usage.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 June, 1905

Bowhill Coal Company has decided to light the houses and streets of the village. Bowhill is the first colliery in Fife to put electricity to such extensive use. The colliery is now turning out 2000 tons of coal per day.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 November, 1905

On Saturday evening, a large company met in the Gothenburg and presented Mr Robert Hunter with a gift on the occasion of his leaving Bowhill Colliery to fill a position in Glencraig. Mr John Brown, oversman, presided, and Mr William Innes made the presentation, which took the form of a handsome gold albert and appendage, suitably inscribed, and a silver teapot for Mrs Hunter.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 December, 1905

It was reported that Mr Thomas Finlay, who has been five years foreman at Bowhill Colliery Brickwork, was leaving to fill a responsible position in Oxford.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 January, 1906

During shunting operations at Bowhill Colliery late on Thursday evening, a rather serious accident happened to William Fleming, shunter, residing at Balgonie Terrace. Fleming was engaged removing waggons from one siding to another. The driver, failing to get an expected signal, went back and found the unfortunate man lying with his right leg run over. He was at once removed to the colliery ambulance room and attended to by Dr Bowman, who had him removed to Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital, where the leg was amputated below the knee.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 February, 1906

Mr R. A. Muir, manager of the Bowhill Coal Company, delivered an interesting lecture before a large attendance in the hall of the Queen Anne Street United Free Church, Dunfermline, on Tuesday evening, on "Modern Mining".

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 March, 1906

On Sunday night while David Smith (42), pit-head worker, Kinglassie, was engaged carrying wood at Bowhill Pit, several props rolled off the pile on top of him, breaking his right leg above the ankle.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 April, 1906

Serious injuries were sustained at the Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday by a miner named Peter McFarlane, residing at Westfield, Cardenden. McFarlane was working in No. 2 Pit when a piece of stone burst from the face of the working and jammed him against a pillar causing internal injuries. McFarlane was removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 May, 1906

... A gloom was cast over Bowhill on Tuesday when it became known that George Ross, bottomer in No. 1 pit, belonging to the Bowhill Coal Company, had met with his death under painful circumstances. His duties were to assist in taking off the empty hutches and putting the loads on the cage at the pit bottom. He was thus engaged when the cage was moved, and he was dragged up the shaft. His head was crushed to such an extent that the face was scarcely recognisable. Owing to the nature of his injuries death must have been instantaneous. Deceased was thirty-nine years of age, and resided at Thirteenth Street, Bowhill. He leaves a widow and eight of a family, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Footnote
See Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, on 2 June, 1906 below.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 May, 1906

A party of fifty mining students attending Mr Parker's classes at Dunfermline, Cowdenbeath, Edinburgh, and West Calder, visited Bowhill Colliery on Saturday for the purpose of inspecting the modern and well-equipped machinery which is in use at this pit. The attention of the visitors was specially taken up with the three-phase electric coal cutting machine. The company afterwards had lunch together at the "Gothenburg".

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 May, 1906

... There was also a cessation of operations at the Bowhill Colliery on Monday night owing to an outbreak of fire. On Sunday afternoon an underground worker on his way to the stables observed that the dook working was on fire. The alarm was raised with all promptitude, and steps were taken to extinguish the outbreak, and fortunately this did not prove so difficult as was at first expected. Water was allowed to flow into the workings, and the fire was got under. It was, however, deemed advisable to cease work for the day, because of the danger of after-damp. The morning shift was not, accordingly, allowed to descend the mine. Several hundreds of men were off work for the day. Operations were resumed on Tuesday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 June, 1906

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Gillespie and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a pit bottomer named George Ross, lately residing at 24 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill, who on 1st May was killed in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery by being crushed between an ascending cage and the lining of the shaft. After hearing evidence a formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 June, 1906

Andrew Mathieson, a young lad employed as a drawer in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, and residing at Jamphlars, received severe bruises on Tuesday through being crushed between two hutches.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 June, 1906

On Wednesday morning Alex. Mathewson, pit worker, Auchterderran, was caught by a runaway hutch in No. 2 Bowhill Pit, and bruised about the body. He was conveyed to Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital, where he died early on Thursday morning.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 June, 1906

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Alexander Mathieson, pit drawer, lately residing at 16 Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, who died in Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital, as the result of injuries sustained by a runaway hutch in No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery. Among those giving evidence at the inquiry were:- Thomas Struthers, miner, 13th Street, Bowhill; Alex. Barclay, oversman, 3 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; and James Webster, fireman. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 July, 1906

George Leitch, pitworker, fourteen years of age, residing at Station Road, Auchterderran, was killed in the underground workings of No. 1 pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Thursday morning. Along with two others, he was engaged removing bars from a hutch when a fall took place from the roof. Leitch was buried by the material, which weighed about four tons. When the body was extricated, life was found to be extinct. In the opinion of Dr Jones, Bowhill, death must have been instantaneous. There was a severe fracture of the skull.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 July, 1906

This issue also carried the news of the death of Mr Walter Bartholomew, which took place on Saturday morning about ten o'clock, after a comparatively short illness. The deceased gentleman was a director of the Bowhill Coal Company, and to that Company, and Bowhill Building Company he devoted much of his time.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 September, 1906

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a pit drawer named George Leitch, lately residing at Station Road, Cardenden. Leitch was killed on 26th July in No. 2 brae in the five-feet seam of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a quantity of stone falling upon him from the roof. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- William Hendrie, wheeler, 3 Sixth Street, Bowhill; Robert Brown, 12 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; Charles Mason, fireman, 28 James Place, Dunfermline; and Henry Burt, fireman, Hawthorn Cottage, Auchterderran. The Jury returned a verdict setting forth the time, place, and cause of the accident, with a recommendation to the following effect:- "That in future colliery owners take adequate precautions for securing that long timber being carried on incline workings shall not strike the roof, by the use of low bogies, or other equally secure means."

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 October, 1906

On Monday forenoon about seventy members of Dundee Institute of Engineers visited Bowhill Colliery. The party was met at the office by Mr R. A. Muir, general manager, who, along with Mr John Bowman, manager, conducted them through the workings underground.
The machinery, which is up to date, formed a very interesting subject for the visitors. The output of the Company is considerably over 2000 tons per day, while extensions are being made to bring this up to 3000 tons.
Before leaving, the company was entertained to lunch through the generosity of Smith, Hood, & Co., Dundee, agents for Bowhill Company. Messrs D. Scott and John Lindsay acknowledged the kindness of Bowhill Company and their agents.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 February, 1907

Mr R. A. Muir, general manager of the Bowhill (Fife) Colliery Company gave evidence this week before the Departmental Committee on the question of an eight hours' day for miners.

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H. M. Inspector of Mines Report
Mr. Robert McLaren's Report

Fatal Accident at Bowhill, Fife
Owner: Bowhill Coal Co., Ltd.
2 April, 1907

John Ross, 21, Miner. Deceased was engaged taking down coal, when the roof suddenly collapsed, and he was badly injured; he died from his injuries 19 days later. The roof fell away by two parallel lypes, which were unseen.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 April, 1907

While William Robertson, miner, 24 years of age, and who resides at Leslie, was at work in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday, a fall of coal came away unexpectedly, fracturing his right leg and injuring his spine and head. He was attended to by Dr Ure, and then conveyed to Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital.

About half-past seven o'clock on Tuesday evening, John Ross (21), miner, Auchterderran, was employed in the Lochgelly west splint dook, No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, when a piece of stone and blae fell from the roof and struck him on the haunch. He was conveyed home and attended to by Dr Bowman, who found that the bladder was ruptured, and that Ross had been otherwise internally injured. The doctor ordered his removal to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.
[See above Fatal Accident entry, and 27 April report below.]

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H. M. Inspector of Mines Report 1907
Mr. Robert McLaren's Report

Fatal Accident at Bowhill, Fife
Owner: Bowhill Coal Co., Ltd.
16 April, 1907

Thomas Nicol, 32, Miner. Deceased was clearing away coal to make room for a prop, when a stone fell from the roof and striking him he was killed instantly.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 April, 1907

While engaged in what is known as the Jubilee seam of No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday, Thomas Nicol (32), a miner, residing at Moray Place, Auchterderran, met with a serious accident. A large stone which fell from the roof struck him on the left side, breaking his left leg, fracturing two ribs, and injuring his face. The injured man was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, and later in the afternoon he was removed to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, where he died shortly after admission.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 April, 1907

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Thomas Nicol, jun., miner, lately residing at Murray Place, Auchterderran, who was injured on 16th April in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a stone falling upon him from the roof, and died the following day in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Those giving evidence included:- James Nicol, miner, Colquhally, Auchterderran (a brother of the deceased); Alexander Barclay, oversman, 3 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; and Thomas Seath, pit fireman, 7 Fourteenth Street, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 April, 1907
FATAL RESULT OF PIT ACCIDENT

The death took place in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital on Sunday of John Ross, miner, Auchterderran, who was injured while working in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, nearly three weeks ago. He had been engaged at the coal face when a large stone came away from the roof and struck him, causing severe internal injuries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 June, 1907

John Davidson, miner, residing at Cardenden, was seriously injured in the Duddy seam of No. 2 pit, belonging to the Bowhill Coal Company, on Monday. While he was engaged at the face a fall of blae came away, injuring him about the lower part of the body. On the same evening William Brown, belonging to Lochgelly, while engaged working at the face in No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, sustained internal injuries to the lower part of his body.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 June, 1907

This issue carried the news that Mr William Gray, who for a considerable time occupied the position of inspector in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, has left Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 June, 1907

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Ross, lately residing at Auchterderran, who was injured on 2nd April in No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a quantity of material falling upon him from the roof, and died on 21st April in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- John Bowman, manager; David Dorome, miner, Auchterderran; James Reid, oncost worker, Burnfield Cottages, Cardenden; and John Smart, fireman, Kinglassie. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 August, 1907
MINERAL DEVELOPMENT

The Bowhill Coal Company are, it is understood, to commence on an early date the sinking of two new pits. They will be situated on the left side of the Kirkcaldy-Thornton Road.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 November, 1907

This issue carried the news that Mr R. Brown, Bowhill Colliery, received a presentation on his leaving the district for Kincardine-on-Forth.

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H. M. Inspector of Mines Report 1907
Mr. Robert McLaren's Report

Fatal Accident at Bowhill, Fife
Owner: Bowhill Coal Co., Ltd.
13 December, 1907

Andrew Ritchie, 39, Pump motorman.

An accident due to this cause [electricity] occurred at Bowhill Colliery, Fife. The system is alternating, with voltage of 500, three phase, and the cable is armoured. In the Lochgelly Splint Coal dook a three throw pump had just been placed, 1,100 yards inbye, and only a few days started prior to the accident. No one saw the accident, and when deceased was discovered he appeared to have been dead for some considerable time. He lay across the sole plate of the motor, and partly under it, and beside him was a piece of iron 18 inches long by 1½ inches broad by ¼ inch thick ragged and sharp at one end, and on examining the cable at the junction where the separate cores leave the armoured part to join the stator coils of the motor, a puncture was discovered right through the insulation to the upper core, while near the cable was a piece of wooden flooring. It appears that while the motor was in motion deceased attempted to put in some flooring under the cable, and in order to get the flooring in position he had to raise the cable, and for this purpose he took the piece of iron to lever it up, with the result that the sharp end cut through the insulation, making the piece of iron "live" and causing the full current to pass right through him. The motor was properly "earthed" by a separate wire carried back to the armouring on the cable, which cable in turn was "earthed" at various parts between the pump and the shaft.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 December, 1907
FIFE ENGINEMAN ELECTROCUTED

Andrew Ritchie, attendant on an electric engine at Bowhill Colliery, Lochgelly, was found dead early yesterday morning beside the engine. It is supposed that he had come in contact with live wires, with the result that he was electrocuted. The engine was situated below the ground in a dook, and used in connection with the pumping of water. Ritchie, who resided at Bowhill, was about 40 years of age, and leaves a widow and family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 January, 1908

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday into the circumstances attending the death of Andrew Ritchie, electric motor pump attendant, lately residing at 18 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, who was killed on 13 December in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by an electric shock from the cable conveying the current to the pump. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Robert Brown, assistant manager; Robert Weir, electrician; James Reynolds, haulage engineman; Thomas Clark, inspector; and John Sharp, brusher. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, it being specifically mentioned that the cause of the accident was not proved, but that there was no evidence to connect the accident with any defect in the machinery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 January, 1908

Andrew Kerr, thirty-five years of age, a miner, residing at Balgonie Terrace, Bowhill, was fatally injured last week-end while employed in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was engaged on the back shift, and had been stemming a shot when it exploded, and he was killed instantaneously - part of his face and several of his fingers being blown off.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 January, 1908

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner, Andrew Kerr, lately residing at 8 Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, who was killed on 10 January in No. 2 Pit. Bowhill, by an explosion, while charging a shot hole with blasting gelatine. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Andrew Brown, assistant manager; Daniel Fraser, miner; Archibald Seath, miner, Bowhill; and James Hunter, miner. The Sheriff indicated that the Jury might add to a formal verdict the opinion that the explosion was caused through difficulty in charging one of the holes, and that the fact that the gelatine was insufficiently heated, caused it to accidentally explode by friction. The Jury gave effect, in general terms, to the suggestions.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 February, 1908

Mr John Bowman, late manager of Bowhill and Cluny Collieries, under the Bowhill Coal Company (Fife), Limited, Cardenden, has received the appointment of general manager to the Labuan Coal Company, Ltd., Labuan, near the Borneo Island, in the West Indies.
Commencing his mining career in Fordell Colliery, Mr Bowman subsequently held positions of charge under the Donibristle Coal Company, and also at Buckhaven Collieries, thereafter becoming manager of Bowhill Colliery six years ago, a post he occupied with much acceptance until his retiral last week, preparatory to take up his new duties. He has throughout his career as a colliery manager shown that he had a thorough grasp of practical mining, as was disclosed during his term as teacher of the Fife Mining School at Cowdenbeath for the period of four years. He displayed great enthusiasm in the endeavour to rescue the entombed miners at the unfortunate disaster which occurred some years ago at Moss Morran, Donibristle.

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"The Scotsman"
15 February, 1908

IMPORTANT FIFE COLLIERY AMALGAMATION. - An arrangement of much importance to all concerned in the Fife coal trade has been arrived at whereby the Bowhill Coal Company (Limited) have acquired the collieries and minerals at present worked by Messrs Walter Herd & Sons, Dunnikier Colliery, Kirkcaldy. The coalfields of the two companies adjoin each other, and the combination will give the amalgamated company control over those seams of coal extending from Bowhill to the shore, and also coal under the sea. The Dunnikier Collieries have been many years in existence, and include the seams of Begg and Dunnikier, and also the seams on Dysart estate underlying the Dysart main. The coalfields will extend over several miles, and very extensive developments of the industry are anticipated at an early date. Borings have already been made near the village of Thornton, and extensive work is likely to be undertaken between Kirkcaldy and Markinch.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 May, 1908

A wheeler named George Campbell, residing in Westfield Rows, Auchterderran, met with an accident on Wednesday morning while working in the "splint" seam of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Campbell had not long commenced his shift when a rake of hutches left the rails. He was in the act of putting them right, when the wheel brake slipped, with the result that he was jammed between the hutches and severely bruised about the abdomen and legs. Dr Drummond was in attendance, and the injured man was conveyed home in the ambulance van. -
Robert McCrae (23), a miner, residing in Ninth Street, Bowhill, also met with an accident on Wednesday. McCrae was working in the "duddy" section of the same pit, and was in the act of lighting a shot, when another blast prepared by his neighbour went off, the result being that McCrae was severely burned about the face. Dr Bowman, Craigderran, was in attendance, and ordered the unfortunate man's removal to Edinburgh Infirmary. It is possible that McCrae may lose the sight of both eyes.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 June, 1908
AN UNEXPLAINED ACCIDENT

Samuel Neish, jun., miner, lately residing at 20 Leven Vale, Leven, was injured on 26 September 1907 in No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a quantity of material falling upon him from the roof. Neish died from the effect of his injuries on 5 May 1908. From the evidence it appeared that some time prior to the fall of fireclay a shot had been fired, but none of the witnesses were able to explain the cause of the accident. Neish was first taken to the Kirkcaldy Hospital, and then to his mother's house, where he died. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 August, 1908

Early on Saturday morning, Robert Anderson (22), Rankine's Buildings, Kinglassie, met with a fatal accident while employed at Bowhill Colliery. In the section where deceased was employed the coal was wrought in two portions, the upper part being taken down a little in advance of the lower. He was in the act of clearing away the coal from the upper section when without the slightest warning, a large stone fell upon him from the roof. When the body was extricated it was found that life was extinct, the neck having been broken. According to the doctor who examined the body, death must have been instantaneous.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 September, 1908

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Robert Anderson, miner, lately residing at Rankine's Buildings, Kinglassie, who was killed on 1 August in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery by a quantity of material falling upon him from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- Robert Brown, colliery manager; Daniel McLaren, pit drawer, Main Street, Kinglassie; Andrew Fernie, miner, Main Street, Kinglassie; and Andrew Blackadder, pit fireman, 10 Eighth Street, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 September, 1908

John Ferns, thirty-one years of age, machineman, 21 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, was fatally injured while employed at Bowhill Colliery on Saturday. He was working at a coal-cutter when he became entangled with the cutting bar of the machine and was drawn among the picks. So serious were his injuries that he succumbed shortly afterwards.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 October, 1908

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Peter Ferns, machineman, lately residing at 21 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, who was killed on 19 September in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a coal-cutting machine. Those giving evidence included:- Andrew Barclay, night shift oversman; William Grieve, brusher, 17 Fourth Street, Bowhill; Robert Lessells, machineman, 8 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; and Wm. Edwards, machineman. The jury found that the deceased was killed through being caught by the picks of revolving bar on the coal-cutting machine at which he was working.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 December, 1908

A turbine engine by Parsons has been introduced at Bowhill Colliery to take the place of the steam engine. The turbine, which is of 800 horse-power, is doing its work in a highly satisfactory manner. At Bowhill 3000 tons of coal are dealt with daily.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 April, 1909

Bowhill Colliery continues to be a strong source of attraction to mining students. On Saturday a number of students from the Wemyss district were shown over the collieries by several of the officials, and were thereafter entertained to lunch in the Gothenburg. On behalf of the visitors, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded by the Bowhill officials, in the motion of Mr Gordon. In the course of a short address, Mr J. Brown, Bowhill, stated that, in the near future, mining would become of greater importance. As the crop seams were becoming exhausted it would be necessary to go deeper, thus entailing greater difficulties in the way of ventilation, winding, etc.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 May, 1909

It is current that the negotiations between the Fife Coal Company and the Bowhill Colliery Company have been broken off.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 May, 1909

At a meeting on Saturday evening of the miners employed at Bowhill Colliery, determination was expressed to abide by the decision to cease work on the expiry of the fourteen days' notice lodged with the colliery proprietors. A special meeting of the Executive Board of the Fife & Kinross Miners Board has been convened for today to consider the situation.

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"The Scotsman"
5 June, 1909
FIFE COLLIERIES.
ANOTHER PURCHASE BY FIFE COAL COMPANY.

We are authorised to state that an agreement has been signed under which the Fife Coal Company (Limited) will acquire the undertaking of the Bowhill Coal Company in Fife. The agreement is subject to the approval of the shareholders of both companies.

FIFE COAL COMPANY (LIMITED)

The Fife Coal Company was first registered in Edinburgh in September 1872, to work the Kelty-Beath Colliery. The Hill of Beath and Dalbeath collieries were afterwards acquired, as well as the Leven, Pirnie, Durie, and Wellsgreen. In 1895 the company was reconstructed and re-registered, and in the following year the undertaking of the Cowdenbeath Coal Company (Limited) was purchased. Subsequent purchases by the company were the undertaking of the Lochore and Capledrae Cannel Coal Company (Limited), purchased for 125,000 in 1900; the undertaking of the Fife and Kinross Coal Company (Limited), in 1906; and the Donibristle Colliery at Cowdenbeath, acquired in the latter part of last year. At the beginning of this year the collieries owned or leased by the company were:- Benarty, Lochore, Kelty-Beath, Hill of Beath, Dalbeath, Foulford, Cowdenbeath, Lumphinnans, Mossbeath, Leven, Durie, Pirnie, Wellsgreen, Blairenbathie, Blairadam, Kinnaird, Donibristle, and Valleyfield. The output in 1906 was 2,868,959 tons.
The authorised capital is 831,250, in 280,000 five per cent. cumulative preference and 551,250 ordinary shares of 1 each. All the shares are issued and fully paid. The capital was formerly 150,000. In 1896 it was increased to 647,500 in order to take over the Cowdenbeath Company's undertaking, an extraordinary bonus of 50s. per share being paid to the shareholders of the Fife Coal Company in connection with the amalgamation. In April 1901, the capital was sub-divided and increased to the present amount by the creation of 183,750 ordinary shares, which were paid up by applying the sum at credit of the special account, and allotted pro rata to ordinary shareholders. ...

BOWHILL COAL COMPANY (LIMITED)

Bowhill Coal Company was registered in Edinburgh in 1894. The property includes collieries at Auchterderran, Cardenden, and Dunnikier (including the estates of Balgreggie, purchased in 1902 for 46,000, and Redhouse, purchased in 1905 for 33,000. The Dunnikier collieries were acquired last year.
The authorised capital is 200,000, in 20,000 shares of 10 each. The shares issued and fully paid last year numbered 12,720 (127,200). In December 1903 2000 reserve shares were offered to holders of shares numbered 1 to 6000, at par. The capital was increased from 100,000 to the present amount in May 1905, 600 new shares being offered to shareholders at 28 per share. In May of last year 2120 shares were offered to shareholders at 32 per share, in the proportion of one for every five held. There are 68,300 four per cent. and 2300 four and a half per cent, registered debentures. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 June, 1909

On the occasion of his leaving Bowhill Colliery to fill a position in Australia, Mr Jas. Ramage, engineer, was made the recipient of a gold albert and pendant.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 June, 1909
COLLIERY MANAGERS' CERTIFICATES

At a colliery managers' examination held in Edinburgh on 21st and 22nd May, the following Bowhill workmen were successful in obtaining first class certificates:- David Black, David A. Paterson, Andrew Barclay, William Brown, and William Russell (Lochgelly).
Second class certificates were obtained by:- Charles Brown, David Beveridge, John Campbell, Blyth Davidson, Alex. Ewart, and Andrew McKindrie.
All the students from the class attending the examination have passed with a high percentage of marks. Mr Richard Robertson, mining teacher, and Mr Watson, arithmetic teacher, both of whom are very popular and highly appreciated by the students, are to be congratulated on the very enviable position the class enjoys. At Auchterderran Mr Robertson has taught mining for the last eight years, and during that time the number attending classes have been increasing, which says much for his abilities as a mining teacher.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 September, 1909

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named George Maxwell, 28 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, who, in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on 27 April, strained his pectoral muscles and his heart, and died from the result of these injuries on 17 August. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Robert Wilson (16), drawer, Old Row, Cardenden; James Beveridge, miner, Bogie's Building, Kinglassie; Alexander Macmillan, pit fireman, 22 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill; Annie Penman or Maxwell, wife of the deceased; and Dr Graham Thomson Drummond, Cardenden. By the direction of the Sheriff, the Jury found that death was caused while deceased was pushing a hutch up a brae, by straining his pectoral muscles and the muscles of his heart, and rupturing the aortic valve.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 October, 1909

Mr James Hutton, inspector in No. 2 Pit belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Bowhill, who is leaving for Australia, was entertained within the premises of the Gothenburg by a few of his fellow-workmen on Saturday evening and presented with a set of drawing materials. Mr George Adams presided, and the presentation was made by Mr Jas. Tripney. The meeting was a very enjoyable one.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 October, 1909

This issue carried the news that Mr John West, blacksmith at Bowhill Colliery, was leaving to work in South Africa.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 March, 1910

Mr Neil Wilkie, general manager of Harthill Collieries, belonging to the United Collieries, has been appointed agent of the Fife Coal Company at Bowhill, in place of Mr R. Anstruther Muir, who takes up duty as managing director of the United Collieries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 March, 1910

Mr Harry Taylor, electrician at Bowhill Colliery, was made the recipient of a marble timepiece on Friday evening in the workshops, on his leaving the district. Mr R. Weir, foreman, made the presentation.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 March, 1910

About 10 o'clock on Tuesday night a serious accident befell David Hunter, who resides at 15th Street, Bowhill, and is employed at Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Ltd. Hunter was engaged in the loading of the waggons at the screening tables when he had occasion to remove two waggons. While trying to stop them with a stick he fell in front of one of the wheels, which passed over his left shoulder. Besides the arm being taken off, the shoulder was injured. Hunter, who is about 40 years of age, lies in Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital in a very critical condition.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 April, 1910

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a shunter named David Hunter, lately residing at 10 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, who died in Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital on 26 March from the effects of injuries sustained to his left arm by being run over by a loaded waggon at a siding at Bowhill Colliery on 22 March. Those giving evidence included:- Agnes Luke, nurse, Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital; James Aitken, detective officer, Kirkcaldy; Alexander Ferguson, the despatch clerk at Bowhill; Alexander Kirk, shunter; Pc. Laing, Auchterderran; and Robert Brown, colliery manager.
The theory advanced by the latter witnesses was that deceased had illegally used a long piece of wood as a sprag, and that he was caught by the end and knocked down. It was also elicited that there was plenty of 3 feet sprags lying about at the time of the accident. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 May, 1910
BOWHILL MAN'S SUCCESS IN NEW ZEALAND

The many friends in Bowhill and district of Mr David Paterson, Blythewood, Woodend, will be glad to hear of his success in New Zealand. Mr Paterson was employed at Bowhill Colliery and left for New Zealand in October last. He has now been appointed mine manager in Paparoa, Graymouth. Mr Paterson always took a great interest in mining, and availed himself of the mining classes held under Auchterderran School Board and Secondary Education Committee, Fife. At the Edinburgh examination, he obtained a first-class certificate.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 July, 1910

Bowhill Colliery has lost another of its officials in the person of Mr Richard Robertson, who has been appointed manager to the Glasgow Coal Company at Carnyle. ... Mr Robertson was a teacher of mining, he having taught classes under the County Council and Auchterderran School Board. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 July, 1910

Mr Thomas Welsh, who for the last nine years has held a responsible position in Bowhill No. 2 Pit, was entertained by those working under his supervision, and presented with gifts, on the occasion of his promotion to be manager of Greenrig Pit, Linlithgowshire, belonging to the United Collieries.

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Mr Alexander Barclay, who likewise was a responsible official at the colliery, and for some time manager at Cluny Pit, was waited upon by fellow workers and presented with gifts on his being appointed to be district manager to the United Collieries, Ltd., in the Armadale district.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 August, 1910

This issue carried a report of a presentation to Mr John Gourlay, electrician, Bowhill Colliery, on the occasion of him leaving the district to occupy a more responsible position under the management of the United Collieries in the West of Scotland.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 September, 1910

This issue carried the news that Mr David Briggs, oversman, Bowhill Colliery, was leaving for New Zealand and that he had been the subject of a presentation by his fellow-workmen.
Mr Robert Methven, who has been winding engineman at Bowhill Collieries for over 12 years, was also leaving the colliery and going abroad.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 October, 1910

A serious accident befell Hugh Meiklejohn, pit mechanic, Bowhill, on Thursday. At midnight Meiklejohn, along with other workmen, was employed repairing a clutch connected with a haulage in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, when the wheel round which the rope passes began to revolve. How the wheel got in motion is a mystery, as men had been employed continuously for about two days effecting repairs. Meiklejohn's left leg was inside the wheel, and the limb was so severely crushed that amputation was deemed necessary on his removal to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 October, 1910

... Mr James Forrester, who has for the past five years been a surveyor at Bowhill Colliery, and is leaving for Labuan, Borneo, was, on Saturday evening last, entertained in the Gothenburg by a few friends and presented with a gold albert appendage and travelling bag. Mr David Leitch, oversman, made the presentation, and on behalf of the subscribers, expressed every good wish for Mr Forrester's success and welfare in his future sphere of labour.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 November, 1910

This issue carried the news that Mr Robert Weir, head electrician at Bowhill Colliery, for over six years, was leaving for Black Rigg Collieries, belonging to the United Collieries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 December, 1910

On Monday, Alexander Dempster, of Helen Cottages, Cardenden, received fractures of the left leg, above and below the knee, through being struck by a runaway hutch while he was proceeding up a brae in the No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 February, 1911

Mr William Brown, late under-manager in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, now manager of the Southrigg Collieries, belonging to the United Coal Companies, was entertained in the tea-room of the Gothenburg on Saturday evening by a number of his old employees.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 March, 1911
LECTURE ON MINING

Under the auspices of the Cardenden section of the St Andrews Ambulance Corps, Mr James Tripney, under manager, gave a lecture in the Auchterderran Public School on Sunday afternoon on the various gases found in coal mines, demonstrating their effects on men and animals. Mr Tripney gave a practical demonstration on a mouse, which he put under the effects of gas found in coal mines. The lecture proved most interesting to a large audience.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 May, 1911
FATAL RESULT OF A PIT ACCIDENT

The death took place in Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital on Saturday of Alex. Addison, miner, Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, who was injured in the No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, towards the end of March. Deceased was walking along a dook in the underground workings, when a fall took place. He halted in order to keep clear, but a large stone rolled down the dook, knocking him against the side. It was ascertained that he was injured internally, although not, it was supposed, seriously. He was taken to his home, but on the following day had to be conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital, where he had since been a patient. Deceased was fifty years of age.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
Wednesday 10 May, 1911
BOWHILL ENGINEMAN KILLED INSTANTANEOUSLY

An engineman, named David Robertson, has lost his life in Bowhill Colliery through the receiver connected with an air compressor engine blowing out. The noise was heard throughout the village, and soon thousands of spectators were at the pithead. To make matters worse, fire broke out, and the engine house was soon enveloped in flames. Fully an hour elapsed before the charred remains of the unfortunate man were discovered. It would appear that the injuries received through the explosion were sufficient to cause instant death. Both legs were severed above the knee. The deceased was 66 years of age, and resided with his son-in-law at 16th Street, Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 May, 1911

An alarming accident, involving the death of David Robertson, winding engineman, took place at Bowhill Colliery on Friday evening last week. In the course of his ordinary duties Robertson is believed to have received a violent blow from the receiver of an air compressor, which, without warning, burst from the engine with terrific force. Whether the blow caused death will never be known, because, concurrent with the explosion, which was heard all over the village, the woodwork of the engine-house took fire, and the building had been reduced to ashes before the charred remains of the unfortunate engineman were recovered. Deceased, who was held in the highest respect in the village, was 66 years of age, and resided with his son at Sixteenth Street. The explosion attracted many people to the pithead. The damage done to property is estimated at 500.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 June, 1911

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Monday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Robertson, engineman, killed on 5 May at Bowhill Colliery, in consequence of the receiver of a steam-driven air compressor exploding. Those giving evidence included:- Robert Anstruther, miner, Bothwell (lately manager at Bowhill); Neil Anderson Wilkie, colliery manager, Bowhill; David Muir, chief engineer, Bowhill; William Christie, engineer; and David Simpson, engineer. To a formal verdict the jury added a recommendation to the effect that in connection with air compressing plant special oil should be used.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 June, 1911

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Monday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Alexander Anderson, lately residing at Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, who was killed by a fall from the roof in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill. Those giving evidence included:- John Anderson, a brother of deceased; James Murphy, pit worker, 6 Third Street, Bowhill; David Leitch, oversman; John Fowler, fireman, Tenth Street, Bowhill; and Peter Anderson, fireman, Wilson Street, Lochgelly.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 September, 1911
DUNDEE INSTITUTE OF ENGINEERS
VISIT BOWHILL COLLIERY

About fifty engineers from the Dundee Institute visited Bowhill Colliery on Saturday. The party were received by the management on arrival. After being conducted through the workshops and shown the pithead plant, they were not long in finding themselves 225 fathoms below the surface, where they were shown through the various workings. Considerable interest was taken in the "Parsons" exhaust steam turbo generator, recently installed to take the place of the other reciprocating engines, which are only used now in emergencies.
The company were afterwards entertained by the Fife Coal Company, Limited, at the "Gothenburg". After lunch the company expressed their gratitude to the Fife Coal Company through Mr Wilkie and Mr Barr for the privilege they had enjoyed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 September, 1911

Mr James Tripney, late oversman in No. 2 pit, Bowhill, was honoured in the Gothenburg by friends and workmen on the occasion of his being promoted to the position of manager of Kinglassie Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 March, 1912

This issue carried news that Mr J. Beggar, oversman, Dundonald Colliery, for a considerable time was the subject of a presentation on his removing to Bowhill Colliery.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
20 March, 1912

A fatal accident happened at Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Co., yesterday, whereby John Howie (68), a pithead labourer, residing in Third Street, Bowhill [was killed]. About 8.30 the deceased was engaged emptying a waggon of small coal into the "creepers", which conveys the coal to the furnaces, when his foot was caught into the creepers, causing him to fall from the waggon. It was at once seen that the unfortunate man had received severe injuries, and Dr Drummond, Craigderran, being sent for, found the man's pelvis bone broken, and other injuries internally, which had caused death. The deceased was a native of Cupar, and was employed at the boot trade previous to his removing to Bowhill several years ago. The deceased was twice married, and leaves a widow, also a grown up family of five sons and three daughters by the first marriage, who all reside in Bowhill, and are much respected in the district. The deceased was also very much respected, being of a quiet disposition.
[In a very brief Fatal Accident Inquiry report in the issue of 24 April, it was stated that Richard Simpson, pithead time-keeper, gave evidence at the inquiry, when a formal verdict was returned by the jury. Sheriff Umpherston, Dunfermline Sheriff Court, presided.]

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
27 March, 1912

An inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court on Thursday in regard to the death of Daniel Fraser, miner, Second Street, Bowhill, who died at his residence on 10th February, from blood poisoning, due to an injury received to his left hand on 30th January in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a fall of material from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- Dr Graham Thomson Drummond; John Clark, miner, 11 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill; and Mrs Jessie Crawford or Fraser, Hilltown, Dundee (wife of deceased). The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
17 April, 1912

Eleven men were injured in No. 2 pit, Bowhill, on Wednesday afternoon, following the stoppage. The following is a list of the injured men who jumped off runaway hutches - James Turner, Woodend, lacerated eyelids; James Davidson, Fifth Street, Bowhill, scalp wound; John Clark, 11 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill, injured pelvis and bruises on back; Alexander Robson and William Robson (father and son), Westfield Row, bruises on the back and legs; William Ewans, Alexander Ewans, and Robert Ewans, Double Row, Cardenden (brothers). William a bad scalp wound and injuries to the back; Alexander, a dislocated ankle; and Robert slightly injured. (William and Robert removed to hospital). Robert Martin, 22 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, slightly injured. William Nasmyth, Station Road, Bowhill, injured on the back. Lawrence Metcalfe, Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, injured back and also injuries to the left scapula. On enquiring at the hospital it was stated that the injured were making good progress.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 June, 1912

It was reported in this issue that Mr Wm. Hunter, inspector in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, for a considerable number of years is leaving for Canada.

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"Cowdenbeath Mail"
3 August, 1912

A serious accident occurred on Tuesday in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company. A young lad named Andrew Davidson (16), son of Thomas Davidson, residing in David Place, Bowhill, as a result, lies in a critical condition.
Davidson is employed at the pit bottom as a coupler, and was in the act of bending between two hutches for the purpose of uncoupling them, when a few hutches at the rear came forward unexpectedly with a crash and caught the young lad's head in between. With all haste he was conveyed home and attended to by Drs. Bowman and Drummond, Craigderran, who found on examination, that the lad had sustained a fractured skull, and was otherwise severely bruised. This is the third accident Davidson has met with in two years. His recovery is regarded as doubtful.

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"Cowdenbeath Mail"
7 August, 1912

A serious accident happened on Friday in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company. A young lad named Andrew Davidson (16), son of Thomas Davidson, residing in David Place, Bowhill, as a result, lies in a critical condition.
Davidson is employed at the pit bottom as a coupler, and was in the act of bending between two hutches for the purpose of uncoupling them, when a few hutches at the rear came forward unexpectedly with a crash and caught the young lad in between. With all haste he was conveyed home and attended to by Drs Bowman and Drummond, Craigderran, who found, on examination, that the lad had sustained a fractured skull, and was otherwise bruised. This is the third accident Davidson has met with in two years. His condition is serious.

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"Cowdenbeath Mail"
3 August, 1912

This edition also carried a fatal accident report on the death of Samuel Thomson Jack, brusher, lately residing at Woodend, Auchterderran Parish, who died on 18th June this year at his residence as a result of injury to his knee on 13th July last year in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, while placing an iron girder in position. Robert Laurie, pit fireman, Kinglassie, gave evidence. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Pressl"
16 November, 1912

In the Bowhill No. 1 Pit, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, a brusher named James Murphy, residing at Cardenden, received rather serious burning injuries on Monday morning. In the course of his employment some gas that had accumulated caught fire and Murphy was burned about the arms and chest.

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"Dunfermline Pressl"
14 December, 1912

Two brushers employed in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, met with serious injuries as the result of a blasting accident on Monday morning. A shot exploded in the vicinity of where they were working. Peter McEwan, who resided at the Jamphlars, received some bad wounds on the head and body; and E. Coyne, residing at Station Road, was injured about the face, fears being entertained that his eyesight may be affected. Coyne was conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
18 December, 1912
PIT ACCIDENT HAS FATAL SEQUEL

As the result of an accident he sustained on Thursday, Walter Lauder, miner, Third Street, Bowhill, died in his house on Saturday. Lauder was engaged in the Glebe section of the No. 2 Pit of the Bowhill Colliery when a burst of what is known as "craw" coal took place, and the unfortunate miner was caught.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 January, 1913

Miss Hannah Murray, assistant in the stores departments at Bowhill Colliery for over three years, was on Friday evening presented with gifts from the motormen employed underground. The presentation took place in the Gothenburg, the occasion being her approaching marriage.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
5 February, 1913

This issue reported briefly that a Fatal Accident Inquiry was held in Dunfermline Sheriff Court, on Thursday, into the death of Walter Lauder, miner, lately residing at 8 Third Street, Bowhill, who died on 14 December at his residence in consequence of injuries received on 12 December in No. 2 pit of Bowhill Colliery by a quantity of coal falling upon him from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- James McDowall (15), drawer, lately residing at Long Row, Denend; John Watters, miner, 9 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill; William Welsh, pit fireman, Sixth Street, Bowhill; Isabella Brown or Fettes, 7 Third Street, Bowhill, a neighbour of the Lauders.
The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Sheriff's suggestion i.e. it was well worthy of the Jury's consideration whether they should not add to their formal verdict something to the effect that considering the dangerous nature of the roof in that seam they thought that specially careful examination should be made of the roof at the working face.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
26 February, 1913
TWO BOWHILL MINERS ARE BURIED ALIVE
UNDER FIFTY TONS OF ROCK
WHILE AT WORK IN PIT

A sad fatality took place on Saturday afternoon just as the day duty men were finishing their day's work in the "Duddie" section of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, whereby two men lost their lives by a fall of rock from the roof.
The unfortunate men whose names are James Duncan (28), brusher, residing in Harris's Buildings, Bowhill, and William Simpson (25), brusher, residing with his sister in Tenth Street, Bowhill, were repairing an "air course", and were just finishing work for the day, when a large "fall" of rock came away from the roof, burying both men. Assistance was soon obtained, but on account of the large fall it was with some difficulty that the rescuers could reach the entombed men.
Duncan was the first to be reached, and was found lying with a large wooden bar and a large quantity of debris across his body. He was still breathing, but he died shortly afterwards.
After clearing away some of the debris Simpson was found, but life was extinct. It is estimated that about fifty tons of debris fell, and most of it being of small material both men were smothered.

BRINGING UP THE BODIES

Dr Drummond, Craigderran, was early in attendance at the pithead, but his services were of no avail. News of the sad accident soon spread and a large crowd gathered at the pithead. Quite a gloom was cast over the district, and tears were brought to the eyes of many when the bodies were brought to the pithead.
Duncan was a married man, and started in Bowhill only a week ago. He leaves a young widow and two children to mourn his loss.
Simpson resided with his sister. Both were highly respected in the district. Quite a number of accidents have happened at Bowhill during the week.

FUNERAL OF THE VICTIMS

The funeral of the victims took place to Bowhill Cemetery yesterday. Work was entirely suspended in the afternoon, and hundreds of fellow-workers turned out to pay their last tribute of respect to their dead comrades. The streets were lined by large crowds, who bowed their heads in sorrow as the solemn cortege proceeded on its way to the place of interment, many silent tears being shed.
Simpson, who was well known in billiard, golf, and football circles (the various clubs with which he was connected showing their respect by sending beautiful wreaths), was carried shoulder high to his last resting place by eight of his comrades.
The Rev. A. McN. Houston conducted short services at the graves, which were in close proximity to one another.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 March, 1913

Mr D. Leitch, who has acted as oversman for 10 years at Bowhill Colliery, was presented with a roll-top desk and chair, and a pocket book by workmen and friends on his leaving to take up an appointment as manager at a colliery in Gorebridge district.

Mr Thomas Ness, who has acted as inspector in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, was made the recipient of a dressing and letter case. Mr Ness sails on an early date for New Zealand.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
2 April, 1913

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday, into the circumstances attending the death of two miners named James Duncan, lately residing at Harris' Buildings, Station Road, Cardenden, and William Simpson, lately residing at 5 Tenth Street, Bowhill. They died on 22 February in No. 2 Pit of Bowhill Colliery from injuries received by a fall of material from the roof. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- George Davie Anderson, miner, Cardenden; William Barr, certificated colliery manager, Bowhill; and Robert Doig, pit fireman, Fifteenth Street, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the Jury.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
16 April, 1913
AUCHTERDERRAN NEWS
PRESENTATION TO AN OVERSMAN

A number of friends and well wishers met in the Lesser Hall of the Gothenburg Hall on Saturday night to do honour to Mr David Barclay, late oversman at No. 1 pit, who had left to fill a more important position at a colliery near Dunfermline. Mr David Burt presided, and referred to the great interest Mr Barclay had taken in Christian work in the district and more especially in connection with the Free Church Sunday School. He could assure them that he had ever found Mr Barclay sincere and true to his convictions, in all his co-working with him in carrying on the good work which lay to his hand. He then called upon Mr J. Brown to make the presentation which consisted of a handsome roll top desk and lovely marble clock. Mr Brown, on rising, said that he often thought that a presentations such as this that the polishing and clapping on the back was very often overdone, and did not convey in a true light a fair estimation of one's sterling worth. He had, however, to thank them for the special privilege they had conferred on him tonight in affording him an opportunity of making a few remarks in regard to their friend and guest.
He could assure them no one knew Mr Barclay better, because, during the eight and half years Mr Barclay had been in their midst he had passed through all the different stages in pit work, and he could say truly that he was always conscientious, obliging, and courteous, and attentive to his duties in what ever capacity he was acting in, and it was with very great reluctance that Mr Barclay severed his connection with them in Bowhill. He concurred with what the chairman had said in respect of the high moral character of their guest, in ever offering the cheering and helping hand as well the kindly word tending to raise one to a higher standard of responsibility of themselves.
He was now very pleased indeed in handing over to Mr Barclay the magnificent presents on behalf of the subscribers of No. 1 pit, as a mark of their high appreciation in which they held him, and he hoped he would not accept only for their intrinsic value, good though they were, but in accordance with which they were given, and he believed he voiced the sentiments of the subscribers that he would be long spared to use them, and that they would ever remind him of the many good friends and happy associations he had formed in Bowhill. (Applause.)
Mr Barclay said the lovely presents he had got handed over to him were unlooked for, and on his part unmerited, but he accepted them with the deepest gratitude, and from the bottom of his heart he thanked them more than he could find words adequately to express. He could assure them he would ever treasure and look after them with tender care, and he would when using the desk be thinking of the many happy acquaintances he had formed in Bowhill.
Votes of thanks to Mr Brown and chairman brought a happy and enjoyable meeting to a close.

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[We believe that Mr David Barclay moved as under-manager to the Leadside Mines, Wellwood Colliery, to the north of Dunfermline.
Imagine our delight when we had the following email from Joe Walsh, Wexford, Ireland: "I purchased, some years ago, an oak writing bureau which carries the inscription "presented by the workers to David Barclay upon the occasion of his retirement from Bowhill Colliery 1913". I have always been curious as to the gentleman concerned. Any information would be welcome and appreciated."
We have been in touch with Joe who has promised to forward a photograph of the desk in due course.
]
M. Martin & Webmasters.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 May, 1913

Mr Wm. Spalding, who has held the position of under manager in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery during the last three years was met in a social capacity in the Commercial Room of the Gothenburg on Saturday evening. Mr John Kellock, under manager, presided, and after a few introductory remarks called upon Mr George Smith to present their guest with a silver rose bowl and a pair of bracket candlesticks. Mr Spalding has received an appointment as manager at Donibristle Colliery, under the same Company.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
18 June, 1913

MINER CRUSHED TO DEATH
BY HEAVY FALL IN BOWHILL PIT

James Dewar, a miner, of about forty-five years of age, living at Orr View Cottages, Station Road, Bowhill, met a terrible death in No. 2 Pit of the Bowhill Colliery on Thursday afternoon. Dewar was working in the Lochgelly splint section about two o'clock in the afternoon, when a fall occurred. The unfortunate miner was buried beneath the debris. A rescue party toiled for more than two hours before Dewar's body was recovered.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 July, 1913

In the Gothenburg on Saturday evening, Mr John Brown, colliery manager, Kinglassie, was met by a number of workers of No. 1 pit, Bowhill, and made the recipient of a roll-top desk and watch, along with a chair for Mrs Brown. Mr John Fulton, under-manager, presided, and Mr Alexr. Mitchell, in fitting terms, made the presentation. Mr Brown suitably acknowledged the gifts. He has acted as underground manager at Bowhill until promoted to the Kinglassie charge.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 August, 1913

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named James Dewar, lately residing at Ore View Cottage, Bowhill, who died on 13 June in No. 2 Bowhill Pit, from injuries received by a fall of material from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- James McCrae, drawer, South Row, Denend; James Richardson, miner, Long Row, Denend; John Wotherspoon, miner; James Gemmell, fireman; and William Barr, colliery manager. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
8 October, 1913

William Scotland (28), a drawer, residing in Gospel Hall, Jamphlars, met with a severe accident last week at Bowhill Colliery. The unfortunate man was engaged at his usual employment in the east side splint section of No. 2 Pit, when he was struck by a runaway hutch on a wheel-brae, and thus knocked down and severely injured. With all haste Scotland was conveyed to the pithead, where Dr Drummond attended to his injuries, which are mostly internal.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 October, 1913

While at work in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday evening, Alexander King, 15 years of age, residing at Denend, Cardenden, received a fracture of the thigh by a wheel tree breaking and getting struck by a hutch. He was conveyed home, and afterwards taken to the Kirkcaldy Cottage Hospital.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
26 November, 1913

James Webster, while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday, sustained a severe cut on the forehead and a broken rib by being knocked down by hutches.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 November, 1913

On Monday, Mr David Stevenson, who was employed on the screening plant at Bowhill Colliery, met with a serious accident by falling from the platform on which the waggons are loaded. In his fall to the ground the unfortunate man struck the rail, and received severe injuries to his head. He was conveyed home in the ambulance van, and medically attended to by Drs Bowman and Drummond.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 December, 1913
FATAL RESULT OF PIT ACCIDENT

David Stevenson, who was injured while at work in Bowhill Colliery on Monday, 24 November, succumbed to his injuries in the early part of this week, never having regained consciousness. Deceased, who was sixty-eight years of age, leaves a widow and grown-up family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 December, 1913

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Stevenson, picking table overseer, lately residing at 7 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, who died on 29 November from injuries received on 24 November at the Josephine Pit of Bowhill Colliery, by falling off a waggon loaded with coal. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- James Cook Stevenson, Registrar of Auchterderran Parish, a son of deceased; Janet Beveridge, pithead worker; Thomas Urquhart, shunter; and Richard Simpson, surface manager. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 January, 1914

John McDowall (26), miner, 16 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, was the victim of a fatal accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., on Tuesday forenoon. Deceased was engaged in No. 1 dook of the Lochgelly splint seam, when a heavy fall of coal took place. McDowall was caught and pinned to the pavement. His neck was dislocated, and the opinion was expressed by the doctor in attendance that death must have been instantaneous. Deceased was married so recently as the 26th December, and he had just furnished a house in the village where he was to have been joined on Wednesday by his wife, who was then resident in Edinburgh.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 February, 1914

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John McDowall, lately residing at Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, who died on 6 January in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, from injuries received by a fall of material from the roof. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Robert Smith, contractor, wheeler, and drawer; David Simpson, drawer; Robert Lightbody, miner; David Black, under-manager; and John Smart, pit fireman. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Sheriff's suggestion.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 January, 1914

A distressing fatality occurred at Bowhill Colliery on Monday evening, whereby a young man lost his life while shunting operations were proceeding. At the mineral lyes the engine driver found the lifeless body of a young man with his head crushed to a pulp. The police and officials were at once communicated with, but were unable to identify the remains. Sergeant Wanliss searched the pockets to try to find something that would lead to identification, and discovered some duplicates of pay-sheets signed "T. Martin, Glencraig."
The body was removed to the mortuary at Lochgelly, and subsequently identified as that of Thomas Martin (30), miner, residing in Currie's Buildings, Glencraig. On making inquiries it was learned that Martin had been at work in Glencraig Colliery that day, but how he got to Bowhill Colliery or what business he had there no one can tell. He was unmarried, and was in lodgings at Glencraig, but belonged to Blantyre.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 January, 1914

Alexander Gilfillan (16), coal filler, West Cottages, Bowhill, received a compound fracture to one of his legs in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Friday last week. He was employed filling coal at his working place when he observed a large piece of coal projecting from the face, and suspecting that it might fall on him, he pulled it down. The coal struck him, and pinned him to the pavement. He was removed home and medically attended.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 June, 1914

Mr David Cairns, cashier at Bowhill Colliery for 16 years, departed for the USA.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 August, 1914

An accident befell a brusher named John Henderson on Saturday forenoon while he was engaged at work in Bowhill collieries. A piece of brushing fell from the roof striking his left hand, one of the fingers of which had to be amputated.

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"The Scotsman"
30 January, 1915

DEATH OF A WELL-KNOWN COLLIERY MANAGER. - The death occurred yesterday at his residence, The Grange, Bothwell, of Mr Robert Anstruther Muir, a director of the United Collieries (Ltd.) For some time he had been in poor health, but his death came unexpectedly. A native of the West Fife mining village of Hill of Beath, where he was born in 1865, Mr Muir acquired a knowledge of the rudiments of coal-getting in one of the village pits, which were then leased by the late Mr David Adams. In 1887, when the Fife Coal Company acquired Hill of Beath and Dalbeath concerns, Mr Muir was selected for the post of assistant to Mr Henry Rowan. He was engineer during the sinking of the Fife Coal Company's Aitken Pit, Kelty, in 1893. Two years later he obtained the post of assistant to Mr Charles Carlow, who was then general manager of the Fife Coal Company. In 1898, he was appointed general manager for the Bowhill Coal Company. While resident in Bowhill, Mr Muir was chairman of the Auchterderran School Board, and a district representative on the County Council. He succeeded the late Mr Henry Mungall as managing director of the United Collieries about five years ago, and he held that post till the end of last year, when he resigned owing to the state of his health. He is survived by Mrs Muir and a young daughter.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 February, 1915

Mr David Middleton, who for the last four and a half years has acted as head electrician at Bowhill Colliery, and who leaves to fill a similar position at Peru, has been made the recipient of a handsome gold watch, a bracelet watch, gold scarf pin, and gold ring from the officials and workmen of the colliery. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 February, 1915

An unfortunate accident befell a coal-cutter machineman, named Ernest McMillan, in the "Duddie" seam of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Collieries, on Sunday evening. McMillan, who had just started work on the night-shift, was, along with some others, engaged shifting a coal-cutter, when he accidentally slipped and fell, with the result that he was struck by the "ram" of the machine, which at the time was revolving, and received severe injuries to the right side of his body and haunch. After being attended to by the colliery doctor, the unfortunate man was removed to the Cottage Hospital, Kirkcaldy, in the ambulance waggon. Mr Millar is suffering from laceration and broken ribs.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 February, 1915

John Black, a coal picker, residing at Bowhill, died suddenly on Saturday. Black, who was sixty years of age, was working at the pithead of the Bowhill Colliery when he fell down and expired.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 March, 1915

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of John Black, picking table foreman, lately residing at 21 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, who died on 20 February on a platform at the picking tables at Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence included:- Dr Bowman, Cardenden; Charles Robertson, picking-table foreman; Susannah Thomas, picker; and Alexander Kirk, shunter. The jury returned a formal verdict, finding that death was due to heart disease.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 March, 1915

A presentation was made to Mr John Foulton, under-manager, Bowhill Collieries, on the occasion of his marriage.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 May, 1915

Mr Wm. Barr, who for the last five years has acted as manager at Bowhill Colliery, leaves next month to take up a position as mining agent at Dennyloanhead.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 June, 1915

This issue carried news of the presentation to Mr William Barr, manager, who was leaving Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 September, 1915

Mr James Herd, underground timekeeper at Bowhill Collieries, has been made the recipient of a handsome clock from the underground officials on the occasion of his marriage. The presentation ceremony took place in the Gothenburg on Friday evening last week - Mr James Nisbet presiding and Mr Alexander Stenhouse handing over the gift. A few hours were afterwards spent in singing, etc.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 September, 1915

In the splint seam of No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday, between one and two o'clock, a miner named George Bowman, who resided at Norwood Cottages, Jamphlars, met with a serious accident, which terminated fatally on Sunday afternoon in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. A fall had taken place, and Bowman was severely crushed internally. Deceased was 46 years of age.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 October, 1915

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner, George Bowman, lately residing at Norwood Cottages, Jamphlars, Auchterderran, who died on 5 September in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, from injuries received on 4 September in No. 2 pit, Bowhill Colliery, by a fall of coal from the face. Those giving evidence included:- Robert Bowman, a brother of deceased; James Barker (15), drawer to the Bowmans, who was slightly injured by the fall; Archibald Donaldson, miner; and George Smart, pit fireman. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 December, 1915
CURIOUS PIT ACCIDENT

Charles McCrae (38), miner, 19 Ninth Street, Bowhill, was the victim of a peculiar accident in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, last week. Along with others he had retired to a place of safety while a shot was being fired. When the explosion occurred he was sitting on his hunkers. The report caused him to rise suddenly, and in doing so his head came in contact with the roof. It being close upon "lousing" time, McCrae came to the surface, where it was found that he had received what was regarded at the time as a slight scalp wound. He afterwards visited Dr Walker, who diagnosed fracture of the skull. Dr Walker ordered the man's removal to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 February, 1916

The death occurred on Tuesday at his residence 5 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, of James Lawrie Nisbet, at the age of 35 years. For a number of years he had acted as oversman in Bowhill Colliery, and was held in the highest respect by employers and employees. Mr Nisbet had been ailing for about two months. He was the second son of the late Mr Andrew Nisbet, mining manager, Lochgelly. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 February, 1916
FATAL RESULT OF BOWHILL ACCIDENT.

Alexander Russell, 20 years of age, miner, son of Mr William Russell, 19 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, has succumbed to injuries he received in a gas explosion at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, fully a week ago. Deceased played for Bowhill Star Football Club. Much sympathy is extended to his relatives in their sad bereavement.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 March, 1916

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Alexander Russell, lately residing at 19 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, who died at his residence on 27 January from injuries received on 21 January in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by an ignition or explosion of gas caused by a naked light. Those giving evidence included:- Alexander Black, brusher, Westfield Row, Cardenden; Neil Anderson Wilkie, colliery manager and district agent at Bowhill; Alexander Spence, colliery fireman, Landale Street, Lochgelly; Henry White, a drawer; William Currie Russell, miner, father of deceased; John Brown, colliery manager; John Fulton, under manager; and David Cook, colliery fireman. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 April, 1916

On Thursday about noon, while employed in the east dook of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, William Mercer received serious injuries by a stone coming away from between two cutters in the roof, several of his ribs being fractured. After being attended to by Dr Walker, Mercer was removed to his residence at Third Street, Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 May, 1916

Mr John Suttie, who had been employed at Bowhill Collieries for about nine years as fireman, and latterly as oversman in No. 2 Pit, was met in the large room of the Gothenburg on Saturday evening by a number of workmen and friends and presented with a barometer and gold-mounted walking stick, along with an umbrella for Mrs Suttie. Mr David Black, underground manager, occupied the chair, and Mr John Watters, sen., handed over the gifts, which were suitably acknowledged by the recipient.
Mr Suttie has received an appointment with the Edinburgh Coal Company at Preston Links Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 June, 1916

Mr David Henry, who has during the last eleven years discharged the duties of underground fireman, and who is leaving the district, having received an appointment with the Edinburgh Coal Company at Preston Links Colliery, was met in a social capacity by a number of well wishers in the Gothenburg on Saturday evening and presented with a purse of gold. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 December, 1916

A very interesting ceremony took place on Saturday in Mathieson's Central Bar, when about fifty employees of Bowhill Colliery met to do honour to Mr David Black, under manager, No. 2 Pit, who has left the district to fill a higher position with Messrs John Wood & Co., Newcastle-on-Tyne. Mr J. Brown, manager, acted as chairman in his usual able manner. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 January, 1917

Mr David Simpson, assistant foreman engineer, Bowhill Colliery, on the occasion of his leaving the district, was met in Bowhill Hotel on Saturday evening and presented with a barometer and umbrella suitably inscribed, along with a silver cake basket and tea set for Mrs Simpson. ...
[It was reported he had been employed there for 13 years.]

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 July, 1917

A good start was made at the various pits in the district on Monday morning after the holidays, except in the case of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, where a mishap occurred in the shaft while repairs were being executed during holiday week. The pit is not likely to be open until the beginning of next week. Some of the men have found work temporarily in No. 2 Pit.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 November, 1917

Robert Lawson (29), haulageman, residing at Woodside Cottage, Woodend, Cardenden, met with a serious accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday. He was caught by runaway hutches and pinned against the side of the road, receiving a severe scalp wound and dislocation of the hip joint. Dr Walker, who was called, ordered Lawson's removal to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. where the man died, as a result of his injuries, on Tuesday. He leaves a widow and three children.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
2 January, 1918
COLLIERY CHANGE

Mr John Brown, who held the position of manager for several years at Kinglassie and Bowhill collieries, took his departure on Wednesday to carry on similar duties at Wellsgreen Colliery under the Fife Coal Company. Mr Brown was of a reserved nature and highly respected by the workmen, who could approach him at any time and be treated with civility.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 February, 1918

At an examination held recently at Edinburgh, Mr James Keddie, Jamphlars, and Mr Andrew Hutt, East Cottages, Bowhill, were successful in gaining second-class certificates for mining.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 February, 1918

A number of the employees of the Bowhill Colliery met in a social capacity on Saturday evening in the large room of the Gothenburg to do honour to Mr Brown, their late manager. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 March, 1918

On Wednesday afternoon, Thomas Leitch, haulageman, Gordon Cottage, Jamphlars, met with a serious accident in the Duddy seam of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill. While he was in the act of sending a rake of loaded hutches away his foot was caught by the rope, and he received a compound fracture of the right ankle. He was attended to at the ambulance room by Dr Walker, and afterwards removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital by motor ambulance.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
13 March, 1918
PIT ACCIDENT

Following the sad accident which happened on Monday night on the railway, whereby a girl [Mary Lamb Bauldie (16)] lost her life, another sad accident happened in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Wednesday night. Thomas Leitch, 27 years of age, a haulageman, residing with his parents at Gordon Cottage, Jamphlars, was engaged at his usual employment when his foot got entangled in the rope, and was so severely crushed that amputation was found necessary. He is organist in St Fothad's Mission Church, Cardenden, and much sympathy is expressed both for him and his parents. It is hoped that the loss of the limb will not interfere with the carrying out of his duties as organist.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 March, 1918

Mr Alex. Muir, engineer at Bowhill Colliery, has been presented by his fellow-workmen with a barometer and silver-mounted oak biscuit barrel, on the occasion of his marriage.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 May, 1918

On Friday last week, while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, Mr John Kellock took ill and died in a few minutes. Mr Kellock had been off duty for a week through illness, and resumed work on the Wednesday. He was engaged along with some others. and complained of being sick. He had spent all his working life in the coal pits, being an official at Muircockhall, Hill of Beath, and Leven Collieries. Deceased was 68 years of age, and was well-known and highly respected in the district. He leaves a widow and two daughters to mourn his loss.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 July, 1918

On Saturday evening, Mr Wm. Wilson, engineer, who is leaving the district, was met in the Gothenburg Hall and made the recipient of a handsome gold watch. ... Mr Wilson has been with the Fife Coal Company at Bowhill Colliery for the past 7½ years.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 October, 1918

Mr Robert Pearson, engineer, who has been for the last seven years employed at Bowhill Colliery, and who has left the district to fill a more important position at Oakley Colliery, was met in the Bowhill Hotel on Saturday evening and presented with a travelling case. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 November, 1918

Mr John Barns, inspector, No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, was made the recipient of a clock and pipe on the occasion of his leaving the district. ...

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
27 March, 1919

A young woman named Janet Davie, pithead worker, daughter of Mr Wm. Davie, residing at Seventh Street, Bowhill, met with an accident at Bowhill Colliery, whereby her leg was broken. She was engaged at the "jiggers" when her foot was caught in them, and had it not been for the timely action on the part of a boy who drew the lever and stopped them, the woman's leg might have been torn off. Dr Walker, Craigderran, was soon in attendance, and attended to the injured limb.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 May, 1919

DEATH OF RETIRED ENGINEER:- On Monday, the remains of Mr Wm. Simpson, retired engineer, were laid to rest in Bowhill cemetery. Mr Simpson was for over twelve years foreman engineer at Bowhill Colliery, and retired about ten years ago. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 June, 1919

On Saturday evening a number of the officials and workmen employed at Bowhill Colliery met in the Bowhill Hotel to honour Mr James Buchanan, who has been under-manager at Bowhill No. 1 Pit for about sixteen months, and is leaving to fill an important position in India as manager. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 February, 1920

In the Auld Hoose on Saturday, Mr David Davidson, oversman, No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, was entertained and presented with an easy chair and suitable gifts for Mrs Davidson, on the occasion of their marriage. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 March, 1920

On Saturday morning, while Matthew Donaldson, engineman, on the dook haulage in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, was proceeding to his work underground, he suddenly dropped down. He was taken into the ambulance room. Dr Walker was soon in attendance, but found life extinct. Deceased was sixty-nine years of age. He leaves a widow and grown-up family, who reside at No. 3 Eighth Street, Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 March, 1920

In the Bowhill Hotel on Saturday evening, Mr George Smith was entertained by a number of his fellow-workmen and friends on the occasion of his leaving the district to fill a similar position with the Wemyss Coal Company. ... Mr Smith has been in charge of the coal-cutting plant at Bowhill Colliery for the last sixteen years, and during that time he has made many friends. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 April, 1920

The annual ambulance competition for the Miners' Cup and gold badges was held at Leven on Saturday last. Five teams entered. Bowhill was again successful in securing the cup and badges. It may be interesting to note that Bowhill has won the cup twelve times out of sixteen competitions. The following are the names of the team:- Wm. Hunter (captain), Alex. Beveridge, James West, Robert Blair, and Alex. Gilfillan.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 May, 1920

On Saturday evening, Mr John Clark was met in the commercial room of the Gothenburg by a few of his fellow-workmen from Bowhill Colliery, and made the recipient of a Masonic appendant on the occasion of his leaving the district. ...

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
8 May, 1920

When it became known that Wm. McWilliams, residing in Sixteenth St., Bowhill, had met with a serious accident at Bowhill Colliery an expression of sympathy was general amongst those who were associated with him. William was at his usual employment when a large stone came away from the roof unexpectedly and fell on the top of him. Assistance having been secured, the stone was removed, and after being examined by Dr Walker, the poor man was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital suffering from an injured spine. William is a strong Rechabite, and has held the highest office in Craigderran Tent, where he is highly respected, as well as by a large circle of friends. We wish him a speedy recovery.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
23 June, 1920
Bowhill Veteran's Experiences.
Seventy Years in a Coal Mine.

There are not many in mining circles can boast of having worked seventy years in a coal mine and still able to do his "bit." This is the record of Mr John Graham, residing in Third Street, Bowhill, who is 79 years of age, and still working as a motorman every day the pit is open for work at Bowhill Colliery.
Mr Graham commenced work when a little over nine years of age at Wellwood Colliery, Dunfermline, at a time when there was neither Education Acts nor Coal Mines Acts in force to prevent him. His first employment was keeping a trap-door, receiving sixpence a day. He moved from one job to another and he delights to tell that at the age of 16 he had a coal place of his own, with a drawer, and he had to "howk" as many coals as pay them both, which he says was not an easy task for such a young stripling as he was.
However, Mr Graham's early experience brought his reward, for having a good practical knowledge of mining, he passed through all the grades and became an under-manager at Fordell Colliery. Shortly afterwards he removed to Hill of Beath, where he filled the position of under-manager for 10 years.
While at this colliery he had the greatest experience of his mining career, and it nearly cost him his life. When examining the pit shaft one morning previous to the miners descending for work, the descending cage got fixed in the shaft, but the engineman kept winding, not knowing that anything was amiss, until the weight of the slack rope set the cage away with a jerk, and the cage went smash to the bottom.
This left the ascending cage on which Mr Graham was hanging, in the shaft, not knowing the moment it also would crash to the bottom.
However, a platform was soon erected, on which were two men, and lowered down the pump side, and Mr Graham was safely landed at the pit top.
Mr Graham removed to Bowhill district twenty-two years ago as night shift oversman at Bowhill Colliery, having given way to the younger men with certificates and more modern mining ideas.
He has been twenty-two years with the Fife Coal Company, and has seen many changes during that time, both in managers and methods of producing coal. He has always been a steady workman, and the longest period in succession he has been off work during these 70 long years in the mine was a fortnight, when he suffered from pleurisy.
He spends his spare time in reading, and although he does not take much interest in politics, he claims to be a Liberal, and recalls many exciting incidents at election times in his younger days.
Mr Graham is a regular worshiper of the church, and a supporter of Cardenden U. F. Church. Mr Graham's family have all homes of their own, and he and his wife are left as they began 60 years ago.
One of his sons is the Rev. George P. Graham, Congregational Church, Port Glasgow, while Henry is in the Chief Constable's office, Rothesay, and James is organist in St James' Parish Church, Kirkcaldy.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 August, 1920

Mr Blyth Davidson, undermanager at Bowhill for a number of years, has been promoted to the position of manager at Kinglassie Pit. Mr Davidson has had a long experience in colliery work, and is likely to fill the position with credit to himself and to the advantage of his superiors. He has been engaged for a few years as teacher at the evening classes on mining subjects.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 September, 1920

This issue reported the departure of Mr Alex. Mackie, joiner at Bowhill Colliery for the past twenty-one years, to Canada.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 October, 1920
BOWHILL GIRL'S SAD DEATH.

Catherine Kerr, a young girl, who resided with her parents at Seventh Street, Bowhill, has succumbed in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital to injuries received while at work at Bowhill Colliery. The unfortunate girl was employed in the wood yard, and had been engaged in the sawmill shed, when she was caught by a revolving shaft, and received severe injuries to the head and face.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 November, 1920

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Catherine Marshall Kerr (14), wood checker, lately residing at 5 Seventh Street, Bowhill, who died on 26th September, from injuries received on the previous day, at Bowhill Colliery, by her clothing being caught and drawn in by a revolving shaft.
By the direction of the Sheriff, the Jury added to their formal verdict a rider to the effect that, in their opinion, the revolving shaft was at the time insufficiently protected.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 November, 1920

Mr George Kidd, engineer's assistant, Bowhill Colliery, was met in the Gothenburg by a number of his fellow-workmen and other friends and presented with a marble timepiece and side ornaments on the occasion of his marriage. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 January, 1921

This issue contained an article on the departure of Mr David Drummond from Bowhill Colliery to a new position at Dennyloanhead. Mr Drummond was employed as a blacksmith at Bowhill Colliery for the last fifteen years.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
26 January, 1921

There has been a long absence of accidents at Bowhill Colliery but the spell was broken on Saturday when James Hamilton, repairer, residing in Ore View Cottages, met with a serious injury to his leg.
It appears that Hamilton stepped into a manhole to allow a race of hutches to pass when just at the moment a girder fell off the race of hutches and struck Hamilton's leg. He was medically attended to when it was found that his leg was fractured in two different places.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times & Advertiser"
9 February, 1921

Mr John Adamson, a faithful servant at Bowhill Colliery, met with rather an unfortunate accident on Thursday, whereby he lost his right foot.
Adamson is in charge of the Brickwork and was in the act of replacing a belt on a wheel which had slipped off when his foot slipped and got caught amongst the machinery. Medical aid was soon at hand and finding the foot so severely injured it was considered advisable to remove the injured man to Dunfermline Hospital, where the foot was amputated.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 March, 1921

Mr William Black, who has been employed at Bowhill Colliery for the last twenty-five years, was met on Saturday night in the Gothenburg by a number of his fellow-workmen and presented with a chiming lever watch, suitably inscribed, along with an albert. ... Having resided some miles distant, he had travelled over 37,000 miles during the twenty-five years. Mr Black had now decided to get work nearer home. ...

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The Great Lock-out of 1921

From the Dunfermline Press

In some places the colliery companies called in the police before pickets arrived. This happened at Bowhill where it is clear that only a well-disciplined march by large numbers of miners averted an ugly situation. The Dunfermline Press states: "Rumours that the men working the pumps at Bowhill Colliery were to be forced to cease work made it necessary late on Sunday afternoon for a large body of police under Supt. Cumming, Dunfermline, to proceed to the colliery. They were met by a force of strikers numbering about 2,000. The miners marched to the pit-head and informed the men employed at the colliery that within half an hour they must draw the fire and leave their work. The police were hopelessly outnumbered, and in consequence were unable to cope with the situation. The workmen therefore were obliged to leave. With their spirits raised by their success the strikers thereafter repaired to Kelty where similar tactics were adopted. Success again attended their efforts."

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 July, 1921

... It is anticipated that at Bowhill, great difficulty will be experienced in getting the water out of the dip workings. It is expected, however, that in No. 2 Pit the majority of the men, with the exception of those employed in the dooks, will be accommodated in the course of next week. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 July, 1921
INCREASED OUTPUT AT BOWHILL

Between 200 and 300 workers formerly employed at Bowhill Colliery are still idle. Previous to the strike there were nearly 1900 employed at the colliery, so that the percentage still unemployed is not large.
Several of the low workings are still flooded and in a bad condition, and will not be in working order for several months. Nevertheless, the output is nearly 1400 tons per day. The men are working every day, and very soon the output will have reached normal again.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 August, 1921

While engaged at his work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday forenoon, David King, miner, who resides at Westfield Row, met with a serious accident. He was working at the coal face, when a fall came away from the roof crushing him severely. After being examined by Dr Young, it was found that his right leg was broken and his back badly crushed. He was conveyed by motor ambulance.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 September, 1921

John Adamson, who resides at West Cottages, Bowhill, met with a serious accident last week in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill. While he was at work a large stone came away from the side, and falling upon him crushed him severely about the body. After being examined by the doctor, he was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 September, 1921

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury. A formal verdict was returned in the case of John Adamson, miner, 4 West Cottages, Bowhill, who died from the effects of having been struck by a roof fall in No. 1 pit, Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 October, 1921

James Gilchrist, brushing contractor, No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, while at work last Friday evening, met with an accident. He was jammed between two hutches. After he was removed to the ambulance room and examined, it was found that his left leg was broken below the knee. He was afterwards conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 December, 1921

While at work in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, on Wednesday morning, David Orchison, miner, who resides at Flockhouse, received rather serious injuries to his back. Orchison had been engaged lifting a loaded hutch on to the rails when he slipped. After being brought up the pit he was examined by Dr Young, and conveyed home by motor ambulance.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
26 April, 1922

A distressing accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, took place on Wednesday, resulting in the instantaneous death of Patrick, better known as Paddy Clark (37), machineman, residing with Martin McCormack, Josephine Cottage, Jamphlars.
The deceased was on night-shift work, and was not long started to his shift, when a large stone, weighing nearly a ton, fell from the roof, and struck the deceased, causing death. Steps were at once taken to remove the body to the pit surface, where it was examined by Dr Walker, Craigderran, who could only pronounce life extinct.
"Paddy" went through the war without a wound, and his remains were followed to Kinglassie Road, en route for Ballingry, by a large body of mourners.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
24 May, 1922
Tragic Accident at Bowhill Pit
Man Electrocuted

Late on Monday, James Johnstone, a workman in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, and residing in Leslie, was the victim of a fatal accident. He was engaged on a coal cutting machine, when he came in contact with a live wire, and was electrocuted. Medical aid was got, but death had been instantaneous. He leaves a widow and five children.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
15 November, 1922

Mr Robert Weir, Bowhill, has received an appointment as manager at Castlecary Brick and Fireclay Works, belonging to Messrs Stein & Co. Mr Weir was undermanager at Kinglassie Colliery previous to his appointment at Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 March, 1923

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Andrew Morris, shaftsman, lately residing at Muirton Hall Farm, Auchterderran, who died on 11th February at his residence from septicaemia, the result of an injury to his left hand received on 3rd February in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by being crushed between the door of a pump valve casing and the casing. Those giving evidence included:- Dr Angus Walker, Cardenden; William Gilmour, shaftsman, 3 Second Street, Bowhill; James MacFarlane, colliery manager; and Robina Ewan or Morris, the widow. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 April, 1923

Mr James McFarlane, engineer, who has been employed for a number of years at Bowhill Colliery, has been presented with a dressing case by his fellow-workmen. Mr McFarlane, like many others at present, has made up his mind to try his fortune in another land and sailed last week for Canada.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 May, 1923

While engaged clearing up a road in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Thursday morning, Mr Matthew Smith, miner, who resides at Woodend, received a compound fracture of the leg below the knee. He and several others were working together when some material gave way from the side of the workings, jamming his leg against a rail. After being attended to by Dr A. Walker, he was conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 June, 1923

A miner named James Thomson, who had just come from Glasgow district and was employed at Bowhill on his first shift, was unfortunate in meeting with an accident in the early hours of Monday morning. Thomson was engaged along with some others in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, when a considerable amount of material came away from the roof, causing injuries to his shoulders and legs. His mates got clear. He was conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital for treatment.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 June, 1923

On the occasion of his leaving Bowhill to take up the duties of surface foreman at Cowdenbeath, Mr Robert Buchan was waited upon at his home, 28 Bowling Green Street, Cowdenbeath, last week, and presented with a gold watch, suitably inscribed, along with a gold brooch and silver teapot for Mrs Buchan. ... He has been twenty-three years connected with Bowhill Colliery, and for a number of years has been pithead foreman. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 July, 1923

A gloom was cast over Bowhill district on Saturday by a fatal accident which occurred in the workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. William Muir, a miner, residing at Colliery Houses, Bowhill, was the victim, being buried by a fall of stone from the roof. A big stretch of strata collapsed. A doctor descended the shaft with restoratives hoping to be able to save Muir's life, but he was beyond human aid. Deceased was a member of Bowhill Star Football Club, and was to have played in a match on Saturday. He leaves a widow and two children.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 July, 1923

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named George Muir, lately residing at 17 Louden Street, Bowhill, who died on 30th June in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, from asphyxiation in consequence of a quantity of blaes falling upon him from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- James M. Young, M.B., Cardenden; Andrew Docherty, drawer, 15 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill; Archibald Spence, miner, 17 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; George Crichton, fireman, 24 Tenth Street, Bowhill; and James McFarlane, colliery manager.
A formal verdict was returned and a rider was added by the Jury that in their opinion at the place where the fall took place the method of supporting the roof by straps would have been appropriate. Sheriff Umpherston added that that did not blame anybody for not seeing that this was done.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 July, 1923

Mr John Shaw, who has been employed in the waggon repairing shop at Bowhill Colliery for fifteen years and has left the district, was waited upon by a deputation of his fellow- workmen. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 August, 1923

Mr Thomas Thyne, who, some time ago, obtained a mining surveyor's certificate, and has acted as surveyor for the Fife Coal Company at Bowhill Colliery for a number of years, has now obtained, as a result of a recent examination, a further honour by qualifying for a first-class mine manager's certificate. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 September, 1923

Mr Alex T. Muir, who has been in charge of the engineering department at Kinglassie Colliery for eighteen months, and has been promoted to Bowhill as shop foreman, was met in "Kinglassie Arms" on Saturday night by a representative gathering of officials and others employed at the colliery. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 November, 1923

David Smith, miner, residing at 12 Fifth Street, Bowhill, was fatally injured while at work in the splint seam of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Friday evening last week. Smith was at work along with other two men, who at the moment happened to be a short distance away. A large stone fell from the roof, burying Smith. Although help was immediately forthcoming, owing to the size and weight of the stone it was impossible to get him removed for some time, and he was dead when extricated. Dr Louw was in attendance at the pit bottom, but the poor fellow was beyond human aid. Deceased was unmarried and resided with his parents. He was thirty-two years of age.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 November, 1923

In No. 2 Bowhill Pit on Saturday morning, John Penman, pit inspector, was caught by some hutches and received injuries to his chest. After being examined by Dr Young, he was conveyed to his residence in Station Road, Cardenden.
At about the same time a mechanic, named Sam McNair, while assisting in the shops with the removal of some plant, had one of the toes of his left foot severely crushed. He was attended to by Dr Young, and was conveyed to his lodgings at 32 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 November, 1923

Mr Thomas T. Thyne, who has been in charge of the surveying office at Bowhill Colliery for a considerable number of years, has been appointed manager at Dunnikier Colliery. Mr Thyne has been at Bowhill Colliery for about eighteen years, having served his apprenticeship there. For some time he was in charge of the evening continuation classes in connection with mining, and was successful a few months ago in gaining a first-class manager's certificate.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 December, 1923

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Smith, miner, lately residing at 12 Fifth Street, Bowhill, who died on 26 October in No. 2 Bowhill Pit, from asphyxia by a stone falling upon him from the roof. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 December, 1923

UNDERGROUND MANAGER'S APPOINTMENT. - Mr Charles Hunter, who served with distinction in the Royal Engineers during the war, and has been associated with Bowhill and Kinglassie Collieries as underground manager, has received an important appointment as teacher of mining under the New Zealand Government. Mr Hunter has had a brilliant career in mining, carrying off many honours whilst a student at the Mining Centre, Cowdenbeath.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
13 February, 1924

On Saturday morning, while at work in Harestanes Dook, Bowhill Colliery, Jas. Keir, brusher, received injuries through a slight explosion. On being brought to the surface it was decided to take him to his home, and on examination it was found he had been rather severely burned about the arms and chest.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
19 March, 1924
SUDDEN DEATH

Mr David Morrison, who resided with his son-in-law, Mr McGinn, 23 Balgonie Terrace, died with startling suddenness while at work on Friday evening.
Mr Morrison's duties were to look after the greasing of loaded waggons ready for transport, and to ensure that a few had been attended to he was making enquiry at some of the workmen when without any warning he fell and expired almost immediately.
Much sympathy is expressed for his widow and daughter in their sudden bereavement.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
26 March, 1924
AUCHTERDERRAN
"SAFETY FIRST" IN THE MINE

On Thursday night Mr John Ford, Crossgates, gave a very instructive lecture in the Institute on "Safety First." Mr James MacFarlane presided, and paid high tribute to Mr Ford's address.
The lecturer also outlined the "Miners' Welfare Scheme" from its inception up to the present. Several members took the opportunity of asking questions on the scheme, and were suitably replied to.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
23 April, 1924

On Wednesday afternoon, in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Mr Robert Hunt, 20 Nineteenth Street, while at work in Taylor's Dook Section, was severely crushed by the fall of a huge stone. His son was working with him, and the sad duty of informing his mates of his father's accident fell to the lad. Willing hands set to work to extricate the unfortunate man, who it was at once seen had received injuries of a very serious nature. Dr Walker was speedily in attendance and had the injuries attended to. He was conveyed to the West Fife Hospital, where shortly after admission he succumbed.
His internment took place on Saturday afternoon, and in the presence of a large following of his fellow-workmen he was reverently laid to rest. Much sympathy is expressed for his sorrowing widow and young family.
Within twenty-four hours of the above accident another sad fatality falls to be recorded. Mr Andrew Keir, who resided with his parents at 32 Eleventh Street, met his death also in No. 1 Pit in a mysterious manner.
While at work in West Side Level he was electrocuted, and despite all efforts he never regained consciousness. Dr Walker was in attendance, and the "Pulmotor" was put in operation, but unfortunately proved of no avail.
The young man was of a bright and breezy nature, and much liked by all with whom he came in contact.
Following so closely on Mr Hunt's death, the news of this accident caused quite a gloom to fall over the district, and on Sunday a large concourse of deeply affected inhabitants watched with great reverence the passing on its way to the cemetery of another young victim of the mines.
The associates of the dead young lad acted as pall bearers, and carried the remains from the house to the grave. It is many years since so large a number of mourners followed the remains of a departed friend to the local cemetery. Everywhere along the route there was evidence and expressions of deepest sympathy for the father, mother, and relatives of the deceased. Rev. Jas. Mackay conducted impressive services in the home and at the grave.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
21 May, 1924

This issue contained news of the retiral of Mr James Hendrie, agent for the Fife Coal Company at Bowhill Colliery. Mr Hendrie had been for 20 years manager at Little Raith Colliery, Cowdenbeath, and, under the Fife Coal Company, he had had charges at Kinglassie, Thornton, Dunnikier, Methil and finally Bowhill, where he has been agent for 10 years. He was employed at Little Raith Colliery when the Donibristle disaster took place and he rendered valuable help in connection with the rescue operation at the Moss.
Mr John Clark has been appointed Mr Hendrie's successor at Bowhill. He was, for a period of years, both oversman and undermanager, and then manager of the Aitken Pit, Kelty Colliery.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 May, 1924
THE No. 1 PIT FATALITY

Witnesses at the enquiry into the death of Robert Hunt, 20 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, who died following an accident in No. 1 Bowhill Pit stated that the fall was about two tons, and consisted of sandstone roof. The place was well wooded, and the accident was attributed to a sudden burst.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 May, 1924
THE COAL CUTTER ACCIDENT AT BOWHILL
EVIDENCE AT ENQUIRY
SHERIFF'S STRICTURES

On 15th April a miner, named Andrew Keir, whose address was 32 Eleventh Street, Bowhill, died from a shock of electricity when engaged at work on a coal-cutting machine at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, an enquiry was held at Dunfermline on Thursday into the circumstances.
The manager at Bowhill, James MacFarlane, was the first witness to be called. He said that apparently Keir had been engaged trying to clear the coal cutter, which had jammed between the road and the pavement.
Witness noticed there was a tree in position, which indicated that probably there was an intention to try to move the machine by means of its own power. So far as the electrician could find out, there seemed to be nothing wrong with the machine. There was nothing to indicate how Keir had come into contact with the electrical current.
The Fiscal - Had Keir any authority to work the coal cutter motor?
Witness - He had no authority from me.
Remarking that the person who was supposed to have given Keir authority was Hastie, the fireman, the Procurator-Fiscal suggested that, however praiseworthy it might have been with a view to getting on with the work, it was an error of judgement on Hastie's part to make any such suggestion to Keir.
Witness - In a sense it was an error of judgement.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
4 June, 1924
THE NEW COLLIERY MANAGER

Mr John Clark, who has been appointed agent for the Bowhill Colliery of the Fife Coal Company, comes to the district with a good reputation, both in respect of his professional qualifications and his personality. Mr Clark, who comes direct from the Dysart Collieries, was for some time manager at the Aitken Pit, Kelty.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
9 July, 1924
COLLIERY AGENT'S RETIRAL
COMPLIMENTARY GATHERING AT BOWHILL

Following the recent retirement of Mr James Hendrie, mines agent, Bowhill, a large and representative gathering of officials and workmen of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., met in the Supper-Room of the Gothenburg on Monday evening, to honour Mr Hendrie.
Mr John Clark, his successor in office, occupied the chair, and after a sumptuous repast, purveyed in excellent style by the staff of the Gothenburg, the Chairman made a few introductory remarks.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
3 September, 1924

A pit repairer, named John Travers, residing at Cardenden Cottages, Cardenden, met with serious injuries while at work at Bowhill Colliery through being caught by a fall of stone. After receiving medical attention he was taken by ambulance to hospital.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
Wednesday, 1 October, 1924

The death of John James Johnstone, miner, who resided in lodgings at 34 Dundonald Park, was the subject of a public enquiry at Dunfermline on Thursday.
Johnstone met with an accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on 26th August, and died from his injuries in the West of Fife Hospital a week later.
Evidence was given by:- John Smith, 5 East Block, Cardenden; Richard Evans, drawer, 19 Third Street, Bowhill; Alexander Dryburgh, fireman, 4 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; and James McFarlane, colliery manager.
By the direction of the Sheriff, the jury added to their formal verdict, an expression of opinion that the roof at the place where the accident took place was not sufficiently supported at the time.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
5 November, 1924

Mr Alex Kirk, foreman shunter, Bowhill Collieries, who has been employed for fully 25 years about the collieries, most of which has been spent in the handling of the waggons, has been successful in securing the position of surface foreman at the Leven Collieries, under former Bowhill manager, Mr John Brown.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
12 November, 1924

Many of the younger lads and lassies regretted to learn of the mishap which befell Willie Hynd while at work in Bowhill Collieries. The unfortunate lad was in the act of clearing some obstruction in the waterway when a large stone fell from the side of the building and inflicted rather serious injuries to his body. On receiving medical aid he was conveyed home by ambulance, and is progressing favourably, although the extent of his injuries are not yet defined.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
24 December, 1924

During loading operations at the Bowhill Collieries on Thursday evening, Frank Maxwell, Annfield, had the misfortune to receive injuries to his right hand, which necessitated the amputation of two fingers. After receiving medical attention from Dr J. M. Young, the lad was conveyed to West Fife Hospital, and had the operation performed with the above-mentioned result.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
25 February, 1925

While at work in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, on Saturday morning, Mr James Smith, Alexander Place, had the misfortune to have his head badly lacerated. On arriving at the pithead he was taken to the surgery of Dr Walker, and on examination the doctor thought it advisable to have him removed to Hospital, where it was found necessary to undergo the operation of amputating portions of his fingers.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
29 April, 1925

A sad chapter of accidents falls to be reported this week. James Arthur, machineman in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, met with a rather serious accident in the early hours of Monday morning. It has not yet transpired what actually happened, but Arthur's injuries to his back were of such a nature as necessitated his immediate removal to hospital.
Robert Russell, residing at 11 Seventeenth Street, also had the misfortune to be severely injured about the head. A distressing feature in this case is that Robert was practically the bread-winner for his younger brothers and sister. Both father and mother are dead. On inquiry at hospital, it was reported that he was suffering from slight concussion.
Edward McCairns, residing at 6 Eleventh Street, was the next victim, and the accident he received happened just as he was finishing his shift. He had a miraculous escape, as the burst of coal just missed his head and inflicted injury to the extent of a broken collar bone and minor bruises about the body. After receiving treatment at the Colliery he was removed to his home.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
1 July, 1925

An inquiry, relating to the death of James Arthur, machineman, lately residing at 4 Back Row, Cardenden, who died on 24th May in Kirkcaldy Hospital from injuries received on 27th April in No. 2 Pit of Bowhill Colliery by being struck by a hutch when walking on the haulage road, while the haulage was in motion, was heard in the Sheriff Court on Thursday.
Among those giving evidence were: James McFarlane, colliery manager; Mr Fraser, H. M. Inspector of Mines; Robert Mackenzie Barr, machineman, 19 Main Street, Bowhill; and David Alexander, fireman, Main Street, Auchterderran. The Jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
22 July, 1925

Peter Kenny, who resided at 27 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, met with his death in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, shortly after nine o'clock on Thursday morning. He had been engaged repairing or replacing a pulley for the haulage rope on a curved part of the road, when the rope sprung off the pulley, striking him on the neck and dislocating it, and causing injuries to his head, fracturing the skull. Death was instantaneous.
Dr Walker, who had been sent for, could only pronounce life extinct. Deceased was forty years of age, and leaves a widow and four young children. Both pits were idle for the rest of the day in consequence of the accident.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
22 July, 1925

COLLIERY MANAGER HONOURED

Mr McFarlane, colliery manager, some months ago gave a most interesting paper on "Kinglassie Colliery Pump" at a meeting of the Scottish Association of Colliery Managers. The paper was much discussed and highly commented on at the time, and now the reward of the Association has taken a practical form, and a handsome prize has been gifted to Mr McFarlane.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
30 September, 1925

This issue carried the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry, held at Dunfermline on Thursday, into the death of Peter Kenny, colliery roadsman, at Bowhill Colliery, in July. The jury, in returning a formal verdict, added a rider to the effect that Kenny should not have been occupied at the work he was doing without something being done to prevent the haulage being started.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 October, 1925
COLLAPSED IN THE PIT

On Thursday morning, Nicol Thomson, 43 Dundonald Park, took suddenly ill in No. 2 Pit and collapsed. With all possible speed he was brought to the surface, and, after being medically examined, was conveyed by motor to the home of his parents. Sorrowful to relate, the young man died shortly thereafter, and many kind expressions of sympathy have been forwarded to his grief-stricken parents.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 October, 1925

On Thursday forenoon, in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Collieries, David Tarbet, a young lad of 16 years, was caught by an outburst of coal. It was anticipated that he had received rather serious injury, but on being extricated it was at once noticed that the young lad had been most fortunate, and the only severe injury was on one of his arms. On being attended to at the Ambulance Station, he was afterwards conveyed to his home at Cairnie Lea.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
11 November, 1925

While following his ordinary employment as a machineman in Bowhill Colliery, Wm. Shields, 49 Balgonie Terrace, had the misfortune to have his foot rather badly hurt by a fall of stone. He also sustained a number of bruises on the left arm.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
23 December, 1925

An accident, happily without serious injuries, occurred in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Collieries, on Thursday afternoon, when John Howie and his son were struck by a burst of coal. Both were speedily conveyed to the pithead and attended to in the ambulance room, after which they were taken to their home in Thirteenth Street.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 March, 1926

James Page, miner, Bowhill Colliery, had a marvellous escape with his life, or at least from serious injury, while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, on Wednesday morning. A fall came away from the roof completely burying him. Willing hands were soon to the rescue to get him released. Word was sent up the pit and Dr Walker, along with some ambulance men, went down taking with them the Pulmotor. Fortunately, Page soon recovered after being released. On being examined he was found to be suffering from bruised muscles and he was conveyed home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 March, 1926

Mr Wm. Lightbody, who has been employed in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, for a considerable time, was met in a social capacity in the Gothenburg large room on Saturday evening and made the recipient of a parting gift on his leaving to try his fortune across the seas. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 April, 1926

Thomas Davidson (62), a Bowhill miner, who was crushed by a runaway hutch while at work in Bowhill Colliery on Wednesday of last week, succumbed to his injuries in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital yesterday. Deceased was married.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 May, 1926

James Graham, who resides with his parents at Wellwood Terrace, met with a rather serious accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday morning. Graham was working along with his mates when a stone came away from the roof striking him on the head and causing a bad scalp wound and bruises. He was attended to by Dr Walker and conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital. The unfortunate lad's brother is just recovering from injuries received through an explosion in the pit.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 May, 1926

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Thomas Davidson, repairer, lately residing at David Place, Jamphlars, Cardenden, who died on 23 April, in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, from injuries received on 14th April in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by being crushed between two loaded hutches.
Those giving evidence included:- Police Constable L. Mackenzie, Fife County Police, Dunfermline; Robert Wilson, drawer, Melville Street, Lochgelly; Andrew McKnight, under-manager; and Mr Wm. Colvin, mining engineer, Fife Coal Company.
The jury returned a formal verdict, to which was added an expression that there ought to have been room for a person travelling to the sump.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 November, 1926

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Walter Chalmers, furnaceman, lately residing at 11 Balgonie Terrace, Jamphlars, who died on 14 September in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from cellulitis following upon a burning injury to his right hand and arm, received on 22nd August, when at work at the fireholes at Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Dr John Wyllie, Glasgow; John Golden, furnaceman, Seventh Street, Bowhill; Duncan McPhee, shunter, Station Road, Cardenden; Michael Dunn, power-house attendant, Bowhill Colliery; and Annie Chalmers, a daughter of deceased. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 November, 1926

For the long period of fully twenty-five years, Mr Alex. Greig has acted as winding engineman at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, and on his leaving for New Zealand he was the recipient of a well-filled wallet of Treasury notes from the officials and his fellow employees. ...

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"Lochgelly Times"
4 May, 1927

While at work in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, Andrew Millar, 12 Sixth Street, met with a rather serious accident on Saturday forenoon. He was badly bruised as the result of a heavy fall, and his injuries necessitated his removal to hospital.

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"Lochgelly Times"
18 May, 1927

This issue carried the news that Mr Charles Annan, Bowhill Colliery under-manager, No. 1 Pit, for fully eight years, was shortly leaving for America.

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"Lochgelly Times"
15 June, 1927

Alexander Howie, Dundonald Park, was rather severely crushed by a fall of stone in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, in the early hours of Saturday morning. On being released he was removed with all speed to the ambulance room where, on examination, it was found he had sustained injuries causing fracture of a few ribs. After medical treatment, he was conveyed home.

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"Lochgelly Times"
31 August, 1927

Bowhill collieries have been the scene of a few regrettable accidents at the latter end of the week.
Late on Wednesday evening Mr Samuel Bowman, Alexander Place, was injured by a heavy fall in No. 2 Pit, and his injuries necessitated his removal to Kirkcaldy Hospital. On enquiry, we learn that he is making a satisfactory recovery.
On Thursday in No. 1 Pit a rather serious accident befell George Cowan, a young lad of 21 years. He was severely injured about the back through a burst of material, and in a serious condition he was removed to Dunfermline Hospital.
On Friday, David Anderson (15), employed on the haulage-way in No. 1 Pit, was entangled with a race of hutches and sustained rather serious injury to his head. In an unconscious condition he was conveyed to Dunfermline Hospital, where his condition that night gave cause for much anxiety.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
8 February, 1928

SLACK TIME AT THE FIFE PITS

Depression in the mining industry, so far as Bowhill Collieries are concerned, has been felt to the full during the past week. Many of the miners employed at the Colliery had only two shifts for the week, and with the heavy off takes little or nothing was taken home. ...

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
7 March, 1928

FATAL RESULT OF A PIT ACCIDENT

Following an accident at Bowhill Colliery, Andrew K. Winton, oncost worker, 1 David Place, Cardenden, succumbed to his injuries at Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Deceased was engaged at work down the pit, when he tripped over a haulage rope and struck his head on an empty hutch. He was 45 years of age and unmarried.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
28 March, 1928

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Andrew Kay Winton, oncost worker, lately residing at 1 David Place, Cardenden, who died on 3 March in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received on 27 February in No. 1 Pit, of Bowhill Colliery, by his foot coming into contact with a haulage rope in motion and causing him to fall and strike his head against a hutch. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Andrew Cran, oncost worker; Archibald Muir, motorman; and police constable John Stewart. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 October, 1928

Chris Mayne, miner, Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, was the victim of a peculiar accident in No. 1 Pit on Friday last week. On completing his shift it is conjectured that he fell heavily while travelling to the pit bottom, receiving injuries which necessitated medical attention. On his removal home no improvement in his condition was apparent, and on Sunday last his condition was such as warranted his being conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 March, 1929

Mr Robert Christie, machineman, ran a narrow escape from death while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill. Prior to finishing the shift he came in contact with the electric current and received a shock so severe as to render him unconscious. But for the promptitude of another workman, Wm. Webster, the accident might have resulted fatally. As it was, the use of the Pulmotor had to be employed and only by skilful application did Christie slowly recover consciousness. Willing hands rendered what aid they could until the arrival of the doctor. Some time later the unfortunate man was conveyed to the home of his brother with whom he resided. Despite the serious nature of the shock and a badly burned arm he is making a satisfactory recovery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 August, 1929

PIT ACCIDENT. - Thos. Carroll, Woodend Park, was the victim of an accident at Bowhill Colliery last week. Employed as a machineman he, with others, was engaged transporting a coal-cutter, and in an endeavour to guide the machine he was caught by the arm and received injuries that necessitated his removal to hospital. On examination, it was found that his forearm had been fractured in three places.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 August, 1929

PIT ACCIDENT. - Thomas Smith, a young married miner residing at 13 Ninth Street, was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital suffering from severe scalp wounds received while at work in Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 August, 1929

PIT ACCIDENT. - In the early hours of Tuesday morning, Peter Hynd, residing in Lochgelly, was severely crushed by a heavy fall in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill. After receiving medical attention at the colliery, he was removed in a critical condition to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 September, 1929

On Monday this week, Hugh Murray, Coalden, employed as engine attendant at the pithead at Bowhill Colliery, received a double fracture of one of his arms and injuries to his head causing slight concussion.
On Tuesday morning, John Howie, junior, residing at 27 Sixteenth Street, was the victim of another accident in Bowhill Colliery. Howie was employed on the "double units" and was caught by a fall and received bruises about the body. After being medically attended to he was conveyed home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 November, 1929

PIT ACCIDENT. - Mr George Dewar, 24 Seventeenth Street, was severely crushed last week as the result of a fall while he was employed in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill. After being medically attended to at the pithead, he was conveyed to his home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 January, 1930

... On Friday morning last week, a more serious accident occurred in No. 65 section, No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, where from an ignition of gas, William Welch, 6 Seventeenth Street, and George Harley, 8 Twelfth Street, were badly burned about the face and body. Medical aid was speedily obtained, and the two men were conveyed by ambulance to Kirkcaldy Hospital. In addition to burns, both are suffering to a great extent from shock.

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"Lochgelly Times"
12 February, 1930

A series of accidents of a more or less serious nature occurred in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, during the weekend.
On Friday, John King, a young married miner, residing in Denend, sustained injuries from a fall of coal. He was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital. At present he is suffering from slight concussion and bruises about the face.
At midnight, between Friday and Saturday, Fred Smith, miner, Front Row, Cardenden, while at work in the Double Unit, had his arm caught by the belt, and sustained fractures in two places. Had it not been for the ready assistance given, the accident might have been worse. As it was, the injuries were serious, and the injured man had to be conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.
On Saturday forenoon, Wm. Cameron, miner, while employed at the face, met with an accident caused by a very heavy fall. He is severely bruised, but so far as is known, there are no bones broken. Cameron's life was probably saved by the timbering.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 April, 1930

John Whiteside (45), East Cottages, Bowhill, while carrying out his duties as an electrician at Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., met with an accident. An electric cable which carries over 500 volts burst at a point under the pithead, and while he was engaged in repair work he had his right hand badly burned, and also suffered from electric shock.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 May, 1930

William Ross, Cardenden Cottages, received a compound fracture of one of his legs while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, on Monday forenoon. With other men, he was employed on a machine run, and was caught by a fall of coal. On receiving medical treatment at the pithead, he was afterwards conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 June, 1930

An unfortunate accident befell Alexander Beveridge, residing at 34 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill. With others he was assisting with the transport of a coal-cutting machine when some timber was displaced, causing a heavy fall of debris. Beveridge was caught by the falling stones and received fractured ribs besides being severely bruised. On being brought to the ambulance room and examined he was speedily conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 July, 1930

An unfortunate accident, resulting in the death of David Rutherford, aged 21, occurred in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, on Tuesday forenoon. The deceased was employed on a section of the Pan Run and was engaged bringing forward a supply of timber when, without warning, he was caught by a heavy fall of debris. Strenuous rescue efforts were made by his fellow-workmen, but when the fall had been removed life was found to be extinct. The unfortunate lad resided at 110 Dundonald Park with his widowed mother, with whom much sympathy is expressed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 July, 1930

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Clacher Rutherford, miner, lately residing at 110 Dundonald Park, Cardenden, who died on 8th July in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Fife Coal Company, Ltd., having been killed by a roof fall. Those giving evidence included: John Fitzpatrick, loader, 23 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill; Edward Martin, miner, South Row, Denend; John Thomson, underground fireman, Balgreggie Park, Cardenden; and John Archibald, under-manager. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 July, 1930

Adam Brown, residing at 8 Mid Row, Cardenden, and employed as a miner in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, received severe bodily injuries through being caught by a heavy fall of coal on Friday evening last week. He was attended to at the pithead ambulance station and later conveyed to his home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 August, 1930

While at work in Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday, William Wallace (16), hanger-on, 17 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, was caught between a rake of hutches and a wheel frame. He was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital suffering from a fracture of the left thigh.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 September, 1930

Andrew Cran (60), 6 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, received a fracture of the left leg while employed in Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday. Cran, who was working in the haulage road in Pratt's Mine, was examining electrical signal wires when a sudden fall from the roof struck him on the shoulders and knocked him down.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 October, 1930

John Forsyth (21), residing at Office Row, Denend, met with an accident at Bowhill Colliery on Friday last week. While employed on a haulage, he was caught by a "return" wheel and seriously injured. On his removal to hospital, it was found necessary to amputate his left leg below the knee.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 October, 1930

James Sheerins, 16 Eleventh Street, had his right hand severely crushed while at work in Bowhill Colliery. With others he was assisting in placing a heavy girder, and the severity of the injuries received necessitated the amputation of two fingers and a portion of a third.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 October, 1930

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Adam Brown, miner, lately residing at 8 Back Row, Cardenden, who died on 28th July at Kirkcaldy Hospital, from injuries received by him on 18th July in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Fife Coal Company, Limited, by a roof fall. Those giving evidence included:- Robert Dickson, miner, Nicol's Buildings, Station Road, Cardenden; Robert Ross, colliery fireman, Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; and Dr A. W. Cuthbert, Cardenden. The jury, on the advice of the Sheriff, found that the cause of Brown's death was bronchial pneumonia which may have been associated with the injuries received by him on 18th July.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 December, 1930

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Smith, 39 Woodend Park, Cardenden, who died on 24th October from the effects of injuries received by him on 5th June 1929 in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Limited, as a result of a fall from the roof of his working place. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- Stewart Gilmour, pit drawer, 1 Balgonie Terrace, Cardenden; George Farms, underground fireman, Cardenden; John Greig, constable, Fife Constabulary; and Dr James Young, Cardenden. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 December, 1930

Shortly before ten o'clock on Wednesday evening, James Conlan (66), brusher, residing at Barnet's Lodging-house, Crosshill, was accidentally killed in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was employed in the new dook, Pratt's Mine, Lochgelly splint section, when struck by a runaway hutch. Fellow workers rushed to his assistance but they found that life was extinct. Death was certified to be due to a fracture of the skull.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 January, 1931

COLLIERY APPOINTMENT. - Mr John Penman, recently employed at Bowhill Colliery as an oversman, has secured the position of an undermanager with the Arniston Coal Company. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 January, 1931

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named James Conlan, Barratt's Lodging House, Crosshill, who was killed on 17th December in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, in course of his industrial occupation as a brusher, having been struck by a runaway hutch. Those giving evidence included:- Frank Cuthbert, brusher, 7 Fifth Street, Bowhill; Daniel Wright, 26 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; John Drummond, 7 Midwest Cottages, Bowhill; and John Keddie, underground fireman, 49 Balgreggie Park, Cardenden. Sheriff Umpherston, addressing the jury, said he thought the evidence had been very unsatisfactory about the signalling between the ends of the dook, and it might serve a good purpose if the jury were to draw attention to the matter. He suggested that they might add to their formal verdict an expression of opinion that great care should be observed in keeping the signal wire in sound condition for transmitting signals; and that the men should not be allowed to travel on the dook until the signal to stop the haulage was not only given but acknowledged from the other end. It was not necessary to find, in this case, that any person was at fault, but he thought that if they drew attention to the matters he had mentioned it would be sufficient. The jury accepted his Lordship's suggestion.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 January, 1931

Michael Dunn, 27 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, met with an accident while at work in Bowhill Colliery. He was caught by an outburst of coal. He was medically examined by Dr Young, who found him to be suffering from severe body bruises.
Matthew Henderson, Front Row, Denend, was also injured in Bowhill Colliery, several of his ribs being fractured. On Dr Cuthbert's instruction he was conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 March, 1931

Thomas Nisbet (51), miner, Coalden, Cluny, by Kirkcaldy, had his spine fractured while he was employed in the No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday evening. He was working in the Smithy seam when a piece of sandstone fell from the roof and pinned him to the pavement. He was extricated in a few minutes and first-aid was rendered. Afterwards he was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 May, 1931

An accident befell James Watson, 5 Double Block, Cardenden, on Friday forenoon last week, at Bowhill Colliery, resulting in a compound fracture to one of his legs. With all haste he was brought to the surface ambulance station and thereafter conveyed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 May, 1931

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Gormley, 25 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill, who, it was stated, died on 23 April at his home from the effects of injuries received by him on 3 February 1930 in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, caused by a fall of material from the roof. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- John Strang, miner, 29 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; Robert Todd, miner, 14 Cardenden Cottages, Cardenden; Mrs Mary Gormley, widow of deceased; and Dr A. W. Cuthbert, Cardenden. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 June, 1931

Lizzie Mellon (15), 13 Eleventh Street, Bowhill, met with an accident at Bowhill Colliery. While loading the picking tables with redd she slipped and her foot became entangled in the moving table. Before being extricated her left leg was seriously injured, and her immediate removal to Kirkcaldy Hospital was deemed necessary.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 June, 1931

MINERS IDLE. - It is regretted that, following the expiry of the notices recently posted at Bowhill Collieries, many of the men have failed to get re-instalment. The pits are now practically working a shift less than formerly. It is hoped that work will again be found for those thrown idle when the new and up-to-date plant being installed at the pithead is completed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 September, 1931

PITHEAD BATHS VOTE. - The vote taken by the workers of Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday, showed a large majority in favour of the erection of baths at the colliery. The figures were:- For, 774; against, 141.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 October, 1931

John Herd, miner, 33 Balgreggie Park, met with an accident while employed in the Parrot Seam, Bowhill Colliery. Caught by a heavy fall of stone, he received a fractured collar bone besides suffering severe internal injuries. After receiving medical attention at the colliery, he was conveyed by ambulance to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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Disaster at Bowhill No. 1 Pit,
31 October, 1931

Ten miners lost their lives following an explosion in Bowhill Pit, near Cardenden, on Saturday 31 October.

a b c d e
Click on Images to Zoom In

a:  The scene at the pithead on Sunday when the bodies were brought to the surface.

b:  Rescue men leaving the colliery after recovering the last of the victims. Their operations were hampered by poisonous gas in the workings.

c:  Another rescue party, wearing gas respirators, leaving the pit. Some of the men spent nearly twenty hours underground endeavouring to recover the bodies.

d:  Part of the large number of mourners who attended the public funeral of victims of the disaster at Bowhill Pit.

e:  The funeral procession passing through the main street of Bowhill village.

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The accident occurred at Fife Coal Company's colliery when ten men lost their lives as a result of an explosion of firedamp. Mr. John Clark was the manager of the colliery and he had held the post for seven years. The accident occurred in the East Conveyor section of the Five Foot seam which was reached from the No. 1 shaft.

There were in the Bowhill Colliery, certain safety lamp sections where only safety lamps were to be used. Hutt's Dock and the East Conveyor section formed one of these sections. There were electric lamps in use and the firemen had flame lamps to detect gas. Electricity was used in the section to run a coal cutter, conveyor pans and there was also auxiliary ventilation system worked by electricity.

The firemen's reports were produced from October 20th, 1930 to August 2nd, 1931, and there were no reports of gas or firedamp. The presence of gas was first reported on 2nd August, 1931 and on that occasion, it was noted by the fireman, that the fan was standing. From 2nd August to 31st October the section was clear. The reports showed that the fireman had been very careful in the performance of their duties. Mr. Clark thought the ventilation was sufficient and he did not agree that it was necessary to use flameproof machinery in the section as it was section in which inflammable gas was not likely to occur. In his opinion the section could have been worked by naked lights during the last nine months.

On the day of the disaster, John Clark was coming to the section when he came to the conclusion, judging by the air current, that the fan was out of action and he started pumping in fresh air. Describing the rescue operations the second rescue brigade got to the scene of the accident about 7.30 p.m. and it was about 3 a.m. on Sunday before anyone could go in without rescue apparatus. That was about 16 hours after the accident Samuel McGuire was the undermanager and was in charge of the No. 1 Pit and the development in the East Conveyor section. On the day of the accident the roof was weighting at the point where the fan was situated. As it would take a few hours to move the fan, he instructed Donaldson, the oversman to get a squad of men and move the fan on Saturday 31st October, which was an idle day in the pit.

The party left the pit bottom about 6 a.m. and McGuire came out of the pit and knew nothing of the accident until 1.20 p.m. When he reached the scene of the accident the poisonous gasses spread about 50 yards down the face and 150 yards down the return airway. John Birrell, oversman, was the leader of the second rescue team and they got to the seat of the accident about 7.45 p.m. and they found the men lying dead in the return airway.

The rescue team toiled unceasingly during the night. Wives and mothers of the men entombed kept an anxious vigil on the pit-head. Mr C Reid, Manager of the Fife Coal Company, went underground and worked alongside the rescue party. On hearing the news of the explosion Mr William Adamson, former Secretary of State for Scotland, hurried to the scene from Dunfermline. When the first rescue team, exhausted and ill from the fumes, returned to the surface their work was taken up by others. They got within 50 yards of the entombed men before the gas drove them back. Four safety men wearing masks at last got through to the bodies by crawling on their hands and knees. Nine of the bodies were bunched together in a corner. The explosion must have shot them from one end of the section to the other after which a terrific fall took place. The rescuers' lives were seriously endangered by the presence of gas. After working all through Saturday night in endless relays, the rescuers drew near to the scene of the tragedy ... their way barred by the heavy fall of coal. Slowly and grimly a way was cut through the coal and at last the bodies were within reach. But it was no easy task to convey the victims back to the main level and not till Sunday morning at 11.30 a.m. did the bodies of the victims reach the surface. That last scene was deeply tragic. A thousand villagers were ranged on the pithead near to the store improvised as a mortuary.

All present there on that day experienced the true price of coal.


The list of men who lost their lives.
Names Age Job
James Drummond Paterson 19 Miner
James Smith 35 Miner
Alexander Dempster 51 Fireman
Charles Baxter Fernie 19 Miner
William Ireland 35 Oversman
Thomas Smith 33 Miner
James Martin Cairns alias James Anderson 45 Fireman
William Bruce Dodds 24 Electrician
Andrew Smith 27 Miner
John Donaldson 48 Oversman



The inquiry came to the following conclusions:

Questioned on the possible causes of the explosion, Mr. Clark dismissed the possible cause as smoking and he considered that it was only a lapse of memory on Anderson's part in taking a pipe and matches into the pit. He thought that a damaged electric lamp was the most probable cause of the explosion. It was possible that, at the point of ignition, a man broke the glass of the lamps which exposed the filament and this caused the ignition. He did not rule out the possibility of tools striking a hard portion in the working place and causing a spark but he could not explain how the gas came to be there as everything possible had been done in ventilating the place.

The jury, under the direction of the Sheriff, returned a formal verdict stating that they were unable to say what was the cause of the ignition. They further agreed to refrain from saying whether in their opinion any person was to blame.

They added to their formal verdict the following recommendations:

  (1) In regard to the ventilation, that so long as men are working in the section with the present system of ventilation, an auxiliary fan ought to be constantly in operation, and that the men should not be sent to work there unless there is an auxiliary fan in operation.

  (2) That all the electrical apparatus in this section should be constructed and maintained in a flameproof condition.

  (3) The encasing glass of the electric cap lamps ought to be laminated or triplex glass. Sheriff Umpherston added that he would be sure that the jury also desire to express their admiration for the courage and promptitude and James Clark, overman; Joseph Mackie, overman, and James Crichton, underground fireman, in their efforts to reach their comrades. In particular the feat of James Clark in penetrating as far along the face as he did without safety lamp appeared to be worthy of the highest traditions.

The jury, along with counsel and agents, joined his lordship's tribute and the suggestion was made from the bar that these acts of heroism should be brought to the notice of the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees.

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"The Scotsman"
7 November, 1931
BOWHILL COLLIERY (FIFE) MINING DISASTER.
PUBLIC APPEAL.

A DEPLORABLE MINING DISASTER, INVOLVING THE DEATH OF TEN MEN, OCCURRED AT BOWHILL COLLIERY, CARDENDEN, FIFESHIRE, BELONGING TO THE FIFE COAL CO., LTD., ON SATURDAY, 31st OCTOBER. THE WHOLE OF THESE MEN, WHILE ENGAGED IN REPAIR WORK, WERE KILLED BY AN EXPLOSION OF GAS IN THE PIT.
Immediately following the disaster, heroic rescue operations were undertaken by safety men, and carried on for over twenty hours before the bodied were recovered. It was one of those accidents which happen every now and again, and which bring home to the Public the dangerous character of the work of the Miner. One of the tragic aspects of these accidents is that wives, children, and other dependants are suddenly bereft of the breadwinner, and, unless a generous public comes to their assistance, their outlook on life is black indeed.
The Committee of the Fife, Clackmannan and Kinross Miners' Accident Permanent Relief Fund, of which Mr R. W. Wallace, Chairman of the Fife, Clackmannan and Kinross Coalowners' Association, and the Right Honourable William Adamson, Secretary of the Fife, Clackmannan and Kinross Miners' Union and late Secretary for Scotland, are joint Chairmen, feel it to be a special duty devolving upon them to make an earnest appeal to the Public for the necessary funds to minimise the loss sustained by the dependants of the victims of the disaster.
It is requested that remittance be sent to the Undersigned at the Clydesdale Bank, Dunfermline, and marked "Bowhill Disaster Fund".
JAS. CURRIE MACBETH,
Hon. Secretary and Treasurer,
Clydesdale Bank Buildings, Dunfermline,
7th November, 1931.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 November, 1931

Peter Grieve, miner, residing at Woodbine Cottages, while at work in Bowhill Colliery, received injuries through a fall of material. He was removed to hospital.
Thomas Welch, residing at Long Row, Denend, was injured on Wednesday morning in Bowhill Colliery. He was employed at a coal cutter, and in the course of the work the machine slipped slightly with the result that Welch received a compound fracture of the forearm and other injuries. He was conveyed to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 January, 1932

PITHEAD LABOURER INJURED. - James Gray, 4 Double Block, pithead labourer at Bowhill, was severely crushed between two loaded hutches of redd. Due to the severity of the wind, it is thought that he did not hear the oncoming hutch. He was at once medically attended to and later was removed to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 January, 1932

CHECKWEIGHERS. - At a largely attended meeting of Bowhill Colliery miners, it was agreed by an overwhelming majority to again have checkweighers for the colliery. The appointments will be made at an early date.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 April, 1932

Wm. Welsh, 6 Seventeenth Street, met with an accident in Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday morning, which necessitated his removal to Kirkcaldy Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from severe injury to his back.

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"The Scotsman"
2 May, 1932

Bowhill Colliery, which belongs to the Fife Coal Company (Ltd.), was the scene of a lightning strike on Saturday, when over 1000 men ceased work in protest against what they stated to be an attempt to cut their wages. At a largely attended meeting in Bowhill Cinema yesterday, the miners decided to continue the strike, and also to withdraw the safety men from the pit. County Councillor Alec Moffat, who addressed the meeting, said that the wages of a number of the men had been cut down by amounts varying from 9d. to 2s. 2d. per shift. If the dispute was not ended by a withdrawal of the wage cuts, he said, they would stir the West Fife coalfield from end to end.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 June, 1932

PIT ACCIDENT. - Thomas Carrol, junior, residing at 43 Woodend Park, received injuries to his leg while employed at a coal-cutting machine. A fall occurred and caught the unfortunate lad, who was working with his father. After receiving medical treatment at the colliery he was conveyed home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 July, 1932

PRESENTATION TO COLLIERY MANAGER. - A happy company of officials and employees of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., Bowhill, met in the Gothenburg Supper Room on Saturday evening, under the chairmanship of Mr Robt. Ross. Occasion was taken to mark the transfer of Mr John Archibald, undermanager, to the managership of the Lindsay Pit, Kelty. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 September, 1932

Jas. Black, residing at 11 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, was seriously injured while at work in Bowhill Colliery. He was caught by a fall, and received such serious injuries to his back that he was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital, after being examined by Dr Young.
Jas. McNeill, pithead overseer, was injured on the pithead through being jammed between two heavily loaded hutches. After being treated at the ambulance station, he was removed to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 September, 1932
CARDENDEN OVERSMAN'S DEATH.

John Birrell, oversman, Craigwood, Cardenden, met with an accident in Bowhill Colliery on Saturday afternoon. While assisting at underground operations, he was struck by a steel prop or stone, and had several ribs fractured. After receiving first-aid treatment at the pithead he was taken home, but on Sunday his condition was such that it was found necessary to remove him to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Complications set in, and he died early on Wednesday morning. He is survived by his wife and family.
Mr Birrell was highly respected at the colliery and in other spheres. He took a keen interest in the affairs of Auchterderran Golf Club, and was also an esteemed member of Auchterderran Kirk Session.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 October, 1932

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of John Birrell, colliery oversman, Craigwood Cottage, Woodend, Cardenden, who died on 7 September in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received by him on 3rd September as the result of a roof fall in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery of the Fife Coal Company, Limited. Those giving evidence included: John Reid, underground fireman, 5 Sixteenth Street; and David Butchart, miner, 10 Woodend Park, Cardenden. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 November, 1932

PIT ACCIDENTS. - Two young men and an elderly man were the victims of accidents at Bowhill Colliery. On Friday last week, George Gray, 26 Ninth Street, received serious injuries to his back through being caught by a heavy fall.
On Monday morning, James Marr, 14 Woodend Park, an oncost worker, was caught between two heavy loaded hutches and received serious injury to the lower part of his body.
Alexander Henderson, Little Thornton, one of the oldest pithead employees, was struck by a loaded hutch and also received severe injuries. The men were removed to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 November, 1932

Andrew Millar, a miner residing at 1 Fourteenth Street, Bowhill, met with an accident while at work in Bowhill Colliery on Monday. He was struck by a fall of coal from the roof, two of his ribs and his left collar-bone being fractured. After being attended to at the pithead by Dr Cuthbert, he was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 December, 1932

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Benjamin Clarkson, colliery fireman, 42 Duke Street, Hamilton, who died on 19th November at his home in Hamilton from the effects of injuries caused by his being struck a blow on the chest by a hutch clip, and received by him on 11th November in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited. Those giving evidence included: Alexander Hill, miner, 13 Eighth Street, Bowhill; Dr Young, Cardenden; Mrs Susan Clarkson, 42 Duke Street, Hamilton, widow of deceased; William Bell, 24 Low Patrick Street, Hamilton, brother-in-law of deceased; and Dr Kerr, Hamilton.
The Sheriff said he did not think the members of the jury should bother their heads very much about the medical evidence because they did not need to say whether this man's death was due to the accident or not. Evidently that was going to be tried in another Court, and any verdict they might come to upon that question would not be allowed to be looked at in the Court where the matter would be decided. The jury would find that the cause of death was bronchial pneumonia which followed upon injuries he received on 11th November from being struck a blow on the chest by a hutch clip. That was just a formal verdict, and it did not say whether death was actually due to the blow or not. The jury agreed.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 December, 1932

Alexander Millar, miner, died in the Dunfermline & West Fife Hospital on Monday from injuries which he received as a result of being struck by a stone which fell from the roof while he was at work in Bowhill Colliery on Thursday of last week. The deceased was well known and held in high esteem in the Cardenden district.

------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
25 February, 1933

The second inquiry was with regard to the death of Alexander McIntosh Millar, miner, 3 West Cottages, Cardenden, who died on 12th December, 1932, in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received by him on 8th December in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company Limited, as the result of a fall of material from the roof of his working-place.
Robert Davidson, brusher, Front Row, Cardenden, said that he was working a short distance away from Millar when he heard him cry for assistance, He found him pinned below a large stone which had fallen from the roof. Witness helped to extricate him and he was taken away to Hospital complaining of pains in the back.
Harry Stiffen, underground fireman, 17 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, who described deceased as a particularly careful workman, stated that he had found the working-place in order prior to the accident. A formal verdict was returned.

Register of Corrected Entries
For the District of Dunfermline
In the County of Fife
Vol.12 Page 58
 The following Report of Result of a Precognition has been received touching the
 death of Alexander McIntosh Millar, Registered under No. 543 in the Register Book
 of Deaths for the year 1932.
Name. Age. Sex When and Where Died Cause of Death
Alexander McIntosh
Millar
45 years
Male
 At 3 pm on 12 December
 1932 in West Fife Hospital
 Dunfermline.
 Usual residence:
 3 West Cottages, Bowhill
 Injuries received on
 8th December 1932 in the
 underground workings
 of Bowhill Colliery in the
 course of his industrial
 occupation as a miner
 there, caused by a fall
 from the roof of his work-
 ing places.
 Per Verdict of the Jury.
 Procurator Fiscal's Office1
 Dunfermline.
 10 March 1933
Certified by Robert Waugh
Procurator Fiscal
Dunfermline 11th March 1933
W. R. Westwater, Asst. Registrar

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 May, 1933

Andrew Miller, 1 Fourteenth Street, Bowhill, met with a serious accident in Bowhill Colliery last week. Caught by a heavy fall, he was seriously hurt and was immediately removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital. On examination, it was found that his spine was badly injured. Only quite recently he restarted work as a miner after recovering from a previous serious accident.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 May, 1933

John Fleming (26), a miner, who resided at 31 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, was killed instantaneously while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Friday evening of last week. Fleming was drawing steel props in a "run" in the West Parrot Section, when he was caught by a heavy fall of material. Deceased, who was married, took an active part in the Bowhill Junior F.C., and at the funeral members of the club acted as pall-bearers. The cortege was preceded by Bowhill Pipe Band. The service at the graveside was conducted by Mr T. J. Weeks, missionary at St. Fothad's Church.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 June, 1933

Donald Graham (29), miner, residing at South View, Cluny Road, Cardenden, lies in Kirkcaldy Hospital in a critical condition as the result of an accident in Bowhill Colliery. While working in No. 2 Pit he was caught by a fall of stone from the roof and received a fracture of the spine and other injuries. He was removed to hospital after being attended to by Dr Brackenridge.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 July, 1933

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of John Fleming, coal miner, who was killed as the result of a roof fall on 19th May in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd. Those giving evidence included John Allan, junior, miner, Station Road, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 July, 1933

ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN. - Due to an electrical breakdown, work has been hampered at Bowhill Colliery, and a number of the men employed in No. 1 Pit have been idle since Saturday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 October, 1933

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Donald Graham, South View, Cluny Road, Cardenden, who died on 23rd July at Kirkcaldy Hospital from injuries sustained by him on 15th June in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Fife Coal Company, Limited, by a roof fall. Those giving evidence included: Alexander Milne, coal stripper, 12 Double Block, Cardenden; and George Welsh, underground fireman, Cardenden. The Sheriff addressing the jury, said the question had been raised as to whether deceased had propped his roof sufficiently, but he did not think they had really got sufficient specific information on the subject to their adding anything to their formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 November, 1933

While employed in the east section of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday morning, George Thomson (43), miner, 13 Twelfth Street, Bowhill, met with a serious accident. He was caught by an unexpected fall of coal from the roof. On his removal to the surface, he was examined by Dr Young, who found that his injuries consisted of slight concussion, and the fracture of two ribs on the right side near the spine. The doctor ordered the man's removal to Kirkcaldy General Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 November, 1933
SUDDEN DEATH AT BOWHILL COLLIERY.

Michael Dunn (58), who resided at Craigwood, Woodend, Cardenden, died suddenly on Thursday morning in the electric generating station at Bowhill Colliery, where he was employed as attendant.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 November, 1933

PIT ACCIDENT. - William McKinlay (57), general repairer, 18 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill, received a fracture of the right leg as the result of some iron railings falling on him while he was at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Tuesday morning. After being attended to by Dr Young, he was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 January, 1934

Gilbert Taylor, residing at 13 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, received severe bruises to his body on Thursday forenoon through being caught by a heavy fall of coal. He was removed by ambulance to his home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 January, 1934

William Bowman was severely crushed by a fall from the roof while at work in the Bowhill Colliery on Monday. He was removed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital suffering from serious internal injuries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 March, 1934

David Anderson, 16 Eighth Street, Bowhill, died in Kirkcaldy Hospital on Friday evening last week as the result of injuries received while he was at work in Bowhill Colliery on the night shift. The unfortunate young man was employed on the machine runs, and was removing steel props when he was caught by a heavy fall of debris, and received a compound fracture of one of his legs and other injuries.

-------------------------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
10 March, 1934

David Butchart, residing at Woodend Park, met with an accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, on Monday afternoon. His injuries consisted of fractured ribs, necessitating his removal to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 March, 1934

... A formal verdict was also returned in the last inquiry which was with regard to the death of David Murdoch Barnes Anderson, coal miner, 16 Eighth Street, Bowhill, who died on 2nd March in Kirkcaldy Hospital from injuries caused by a roof fall on 1st March in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 April, 1934

James Clark (25), miner, 48 Dundonald Park, Cardenden, lies in Kirkcaldy Hospital suffering from injuries received in an accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He was caught between a hutch and the main haulage road and received internal injuries and severe burning on the right side.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 August, 1934

Alexander Mathieson (27), miner, Dundonald Crescent, Dundonald, was admitted to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital last weekend suffering from severe injuries received in an accident at Bowhill Colliery. While he was at work in No. 2 Pit, he was struck by a stone which fell from the coal face. His back was badly bruised, and he received internal injuries and shock.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 November, 1934

Alexander Lamb (63), a miner who resided at Balgonie Terrace, Jamphlars, Cardenden, was killed in an accident in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Friday night of last week. He was buried by a fall of debris from the roof in the East Dook section, and it was some time before his workmates succeeded in extricating him. Deceased, who had been employed in the colliery for fully 30 years, is survived by his widow and a grown-up family.

---------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
15 December, 1934

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Alexander Lamb, 10 Balgonie Terrace, Auchterderran, who died on 2 November in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, from injuries caused by a roof fall. Those giving evidence included: William Mitchell, miner, 15 Tenth Street, Bowhill, and George Crichton, fireman, 24 Tenth Street, Bowhill. On the suggestion of the Sheriff, the jury added to their formal verdict an expression of opinion that the small stoop of coal by which the roof was supported was insufficient for the purpose.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 December, 1934

Patrick Dobban, residing at 11 Double Block, Cardenden, met with an unfortunate accident while employed in Bowhill Colliery. The accident was caused by a fall of stone, and the victim received a compound fracture of the leg.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 January, 1935

PIT ACCIDENT. - George Reid (17), residing with his parents at 10 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, was admitted to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital suffering from a fracture of the thigh in addition to body injuries. Reid, who was employed in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill, was caught by a heavy fall which almost buried him. It was with difficulty that he was extricated.

-------------------------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
9 March, 1935

A fatal accident took place in Bowhill Colliery, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Limited, on Monday morning. The victim was John Wallace, junior, miner, residing at Annfield, Cardenden. A number of men were just finishing breakfast when a crash was heard in the working place of Wallace, who had partaken of his meal earlier than his workmates and returned to the "face". It was found that a fall of coal had taken place, estimated to weigh about two tons. Wallace was caught about the head and upper part of the body, and his workmates had to break up the coal before the man was extricated. Death must have been instantaneous. Deceased was a married man, forty-three years of age.

------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
23 March, 1935

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Wallace, Annfield House, Cardenden, who died on 4th March in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, from injuries received as the result of a fall of coal in his working-place. Those giving evidence included: George Herd, 28 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, and, Alexander Izatt, underground fireman, 8 Bottom West Cottages, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 August, 1935

COLLIERY WORKER INJURED. - George Scotland, junior, 5 Thirteenth Street, had one of his legs fractured while at work at Bowhill Colliery. Part of the roof became dislodged and Scotland was caught by a heavy stone. He received medical attention at the colliery and later was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital. He is a member of Bowhill Prize Pipe Band.

-------------------------------------

"The Scotsman"
25 October, 1935
FIFE PIT FATALITY INQUIRY
Men who Ignored Danger Warning

Several miners who had ignored a warning against travelling on a haulage road when the haulage was in motion appeared as witnesses in Dunfermline Sheriff Court yesterday in an inquiry into the death of Alexander Pratt, aged 18, coal miner, Newton Cottages, Balgreggie Road, Cardenden. Pratt died on October 5 in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, as a result of injuries received that day in the haulage road in Hutt's Dook, No. 1 pit, Bowhill Colliery, caused by his being struck by part of the haulage, which was then in motion.
George Tullis, 17 Tenth Street, Bowhill, the clipper employed at the foot of the dook, said that after he had sent away the last full hutch, Pratt and his father and other four men started to walk up the road. It was illegal for men to travel on the road when the haulage was in motion, and he warned them not to do so. He was away for about two minutes attending to other duties, and when he came back he found that the men had gone up the road.
Hugh Conway, 4 Double Block, Cardenden, the clipper employed at the top of the dook, said he saw the haulage rope bobbing up and down, and then heard the noise of a hutch going over on its side. He called out, "Is everybody clear?" and got no answer, but he heard someone moaning. On going down the dook to investigate, he found Pratt lying injured on the line on which the hutch had been coming up.
Philip Pratt, father of the deceased, said that the oversman who was sitting in a manhole, told him and his companions that they should not be travelling on the dook when the haulage was in motion, and that they were running a great risk.
The Procurator-Fiscal (Mr R. J. Waugh), who conducted the inquiry, mentioned that every one of Pratt's companions had pleaded guilty to a contravention of the Coal Mines Act, and had been each fined 2.
The jury returned a formal verdict, and found that the accident was due to Pratt and the other men travelling the dook when the haulage was in motion, contrary to the Coal Mines Act regulations.

-----------------

"Dunfermline Press"
26 October, 1935

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Alexander Pratt, miner, Newton Cottages, Balgreggie Road, Cardenden, who died on 5th October in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital as a result of injuries received that day in the haulage road in Hutt's Dook in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, caused by his being struck by part of the haulage which was then in motion.
Those giving evidence included: George Tullis, 17 Tenth Street, Bowhill; Hugh Conway, 4 Double Block, Cardenden; Thomas Johnstone, miner, 28 Dundonald Park, Cardenden; Philip Pratt, miner, Newton Cottages, Balgreggie Road, Cardenden (father of the deceased); and James Clark, oversman, 46 Balgreggie Park, Cardenden. The jury returned a formal verdict, and, on the suggestion of the Sheriff, found that the accident was due to Pratt and the other men travelling the dook when the haulage was in motion, contrary to the Coal Mines Act regulations.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 November, 1935
BOWHILL PITHEAD FATALITY.

John Finnie Blyth Izatt (23), jigger engineman, 2 West Cottages, Bowhill, was killed while at work at the pithead at Bowhill Colliery on Monday forenoon. His head became wedged between a revolving coal-tipper and the framework of the machine, and he received a fracture of the base of the skull. Deceased was unmarried.

---------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
21 December, 1935

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of John Finnie Blyth Izatt, colliery screening plant attendant, 2 Bottom West Cottages, Bowhill, who died on 25th November at the screening plant at Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, from injuries caused by his being crushed by one of the tippers when repairing it. Those giving evidence included: Mr Robert Shirkie, Scottish Colliery Engine and Boilermen's Association; Peter Crombie Martin (15), pithead worker, 17 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; William McNeill, pithead foreman, 8 Eighth Street, Bowhill; George Smith, shunter, 23 Fifth Street, Bowhill; and John Clark, colliery manager. The jury accepted Sheriff Umpherston's suggestion regarding an addition to the formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 January, 1936

PIT ACCIDENT. - Thomas McGhee, jun., whilst employed in Bowhill Colliery, met with an accident. Employed as a transport worker, he was caught while in the execution of his duties by a race of hutches and received severe injuries to his legs. He was conveyed to his home at St Clair Cottages.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 June, 1936
DEATH OF MR PHILIP HODGE.

The death took place in the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary on Wednesday of Mr Philip Hodge, who for many years had been actively associated with coal mining in the county, and latterly with the mining trade union movement.
A native of Kelty, Mr Hodge went to work in the pits as a boy. Studying the technology of mining, he was appointed oversman in the Fife Coal Company's Aitken Pit, Kelty, and he subsequently became manager of the old Benarty Colliery, and later of the Fife Coal Company's colliery at Bowhill. He was still in the prime of life when he gave up colliery managerial work to devote his whole attention to the business of the Fife, Clackmannan, and Kinross Miners' Union, of which he became one of the permanent officials, residing at Valleyfield. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 July, 1936
FATAL ACCIDENT AT BOWHILL COLLIERY.

On Monday night, while proceeding to his work in Bowhill Colliery, Thomas McGregor, 67 Woodend Park, Cardenden, was struck by a race of runaway hutches and dragged a considerable distance before the hutches could be stopped. He received terrible injuries. With all possible speed he was conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital where, early on Wednesday morning, he died. The deceased is survived by his wife and a grown-up family.

--------------------

"Dunfermline Press"
1 August, 1936

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Thomas McGregor, 67 Woodend Park, Cardenden, who died on 8th July in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received by him on 6th July in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, caused by his being struck by a runaway race of hutches. Those giving evidence included: David Fernie, underground repairer, 14 Ninth Street, Bowhill, and Joseph Malcolm, pit fireman, Belmont Cottages, Cluny Road, Cardenden. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 November, 1936

Alex. Anderson, 123 Dundonald Park, met with an accident in Bowhill Colliery on Monday. He was caught by a fall of stone which caused him to come in contact with the conveyor pans, resulting in serious injury about the chest. He was attended to by Dr Brackenridge, and thereafter taken by ambulance to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 January, 1937
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY AT THE COAL FACE.

Mr John Kerr, chief electrician at Bowhill Colliery, was the lecturer on Thursday evening at the practical class for miners in Auchterderran School. Mr Kerr began by explaining the earth protection system at Bowhill Colliery, which, he said, was typical of all modern collieries. He afterwards dealt with the care and maintenance of trailing cables, plugs, switches, controllers, coal-cutting machines, and conveyor motors.
The development of flame-proof apparatus as now required in sections where safety lamps were in use was then described, and the lecturer concluded by dealing with electrical signalling apparatus and shot-firing batteries. The lecture was supplemented by illustrations and diagrams.
Mr S. McGuire, undermanager of Bowhill Colliery, who presided, initiated a lengthy discussion, and afterwards proposed a vote of thanks to the lecturer.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 October, 1937
BOWHILL PIT ACCIDENT.

John Tinney (34), a pit worker, residing at Long Row, Denend, Dundonald, lies in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital suffering from severe back injuries which he received as the result of an accident in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Tinney had bored a number of holes in the roof with an air-compressor, and was seated at the side of the road after completing the work when a stone, weighing about half a hundredweight, fell from the roof and struck his back. Tinney, who was found to have lost the power of his legs, was conveyed to the pithead, where he was examined by a doctor, who ordered his removal to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 April, 1938
NEW POWER PLANT AT BOWHILL COLLIERY.

The members of the Fife Coal Company Mining Students' Association visited the new power plant at Bowhill Colliery, on Wednesday afternoon. This plant has been erected at a cost of over £50,000 and is designed to make the colliery independent of the Kelty Central Power Station for its power requirements.
Three new water-tube boilers have just been put into service to replace the old range of Lancashire boilers. Each of the water-tube boilers is designed to produce 30,000 lbs. of steam per hour, at a working pressure of 200 lbs. per square inch. They are fitted with automatic chain-grate feed stokers capable of burning low-grade fuel. The plant was erected by Messrs Clarke, Chapman & Co., Ltd., Newcastle.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 July, 1938

New pithead baths, of the most modern type, which have been erected at the Fife Coal Company's Bowhill Colliery, will be opened this afternoon by Mr C. Augustus Carlow, Managing Director of the Company, along with Mr Alex. McLean, Gammie Place, Cardenden, the oldest miner in the district.

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"The Scotsman"
1 August, 1938
MINERS' WELFARE
Pithead Baths Opened at Bowhill Colliery
£30,000 SCHEME

The importance of the coal-mining industry to Britain and the fine achievements of the Miners' Welfare Fund were commented on by several speakers at the opening of Bowhill Colliery's £30,000 pithead baths on Saturday, near Lochgelly.
The baths were provided by the Miners' Welfare Committee, and have accommodation for 1500 miners and 24 women workers.
Mr H. S. Calder, agent of the Fife Coal Co., Ltd., presided at the opening ceremony, and remarked that it was a big day for Bowhill, for they had waited 40 years for the baths. He called on Mr Jack, the architect, to formally hand over the baths to the Trustees.
Mr Jack, representing the Central Miners' Welfare Committee, said he brought the Committee's best wishes for the future success of the scheme. The baths, which were the second largest pithead baths in Scotland, were the 237th to be erected in Britain, and the ninth in the district. They contained all the latest developments in apparatus and equipment. Pithead baths were a great boon to a mining community, not only to the miners themselves but also to their families, and particularly to their wives.
He remarked that the Fife Coal Co. had made their usual contribution to the scheme by providing, free of charge, the steam and electricity.
County Councillor J. C. Robertson received the baths on behalf of the Trustees. He said it was eight years since the question of pithead baths at Bowhill had been raised. That was a long time ago; but now they were all happy, and proud to have the fine new building. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 November, 1938
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

As the result of an accident in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill, Peter Moyes, who resided at 35 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, has died in Kirkcaldy Hospital. The deceased, who was employed on the night-shift, received serious injury to his back and other parts of his body owing to a heavy roof fall.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 November, 1938
PIT BOYS' SAFETY CLASS.
BOWHILL AND CARDENDEN PASSES.

An examination was recently conducted at Auchterderran School in connection with the First Year Boys' Safety Class. The examiners were Messrs H. S. Calder, agent; John Clark, manager, Bowhill Colliery; and Wm. Reid, assistant colliery manager.
The list of passes is as follows:- Frances Barnes, 11 Fourteenth Street, Bowhill; Geo. Dickson, 11 Ninth Street, Bowhill; Robert Dow, Dundonald Park, Cardenden; John Fraser, Larroch Cottage, Cardenden; George Hunter, Craig Villa, Cardenden; Thomas Paterson, 20 Nineteenth Street, Cardenden; Joseph Brown, 30 Nineteenth Street, Cardenden; Henry Brown, Ore View Cottages, Cardenden; John Brown, 8 Wellwood Terrace, Cardenden; Arthur Campbell, 20 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill; James Cuthbert, 7 Fifth Street, Bowhill; James Kenny, 27 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; James King, Novar Cottages, Cardenden; David Thomson, 25 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; Wm. Walker, 2 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill; George Whyte, 9 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; Robert Wyse, 30 Fifth Street, Bowhill; George Wallace, 14 Eighth Street, Bowhill; James Caulfield, Begg Farm, Kirkcaldy; Charles Grant, 8 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill; James Keddie, Annfield Houses, Bowhill; John Ritchie, 109 Dundonald Park, Cardenden; Wm. Shields, 3 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill; Andrew Wilson, 6 Third Street, Bowhill; Patrick Cullen, 6 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill; Robert Dryburgh, 23 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; James Jamieson, 8 Ninth Street, Bowhill; Wm. Lumsden, 9 Front Row, Cardenden; David Mackie, 13 Back Row, Cardenden; Alfred McPherson, 1 Front Row, Cardenden; George Raeburgh, 35 Dundonald Den, Cardenden; Edward Rogers, 5 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill; and Wm. Webster, 27 Sixth Street, Bowhill.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 November, 1938

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Peter Moyes, 35 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill, who died on 9th November in Kirkcaldy Hospital from the effects of injuries sustained by him on 8th November in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, caused by a fall of stone from the roof of his working-place. The evidence was to the effect that in this case, also, there was a hidden "lipe" which was not revealed until the stone came out.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 January, 1939
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

One man was killed and another injured in an accident in Bowhill Colliery on Monday night. The two men, George Wilson, 30 Gammie Place, Cardenden, and Hugh Miller, Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, were sitting together at "piece-time" in No. 7 west section of No. 2 Pit, when, without warning, a large stone fell from the roof. Wilson was killed instantaneously, but Miller escaped with severe bruises about the body. Wilson, who was 31 years of age, leaves a widow and a young child.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 February, 1939

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of George Wilson, coal miner, 30 Gammie Place, Cardenden, who was killed on 23rd January, in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., by a fall of stone from the roof of his working place. Those giving evidence included: James McLean, mining contractor, 18 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill; Hugh J. Miller, 16 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill; and Thomas P. Fleming, colliery fireman, 19 Ninth Street, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 March, 1939
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.
COWDENBEATH MAN ELECTROCUTED.

James Addison (51), 39 Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, was killed, and Thomas Malcolm (39), 3 Balgreggie Park, Cardenden, was seriously injured as the result of an accident on Tuesday forenoon in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. The men were employed as pan-shifters and were carrying a conveyor pan when it slipped and came in contact with an electric cable. Addison was electrocuted, and Malcolm had to receive artificial respiration before he revived sufficiently to allow his removal to Kirkcaldy Hospital. Addison leaves a widow and grown-up family.

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MISCELLANEOUS
"Auchterderran of Yesteryear"
"Sounds of Yesteryear"
1939

At the start of the war in 1939, the pit horn was used as an air raid warning until a siren was fixed on the Cinema roof! In an article "Sounds of Yesteryear", Adam Russell recalls the blasts on the horn at Bowhill Pit. The first of the day was at 5.25 a.m. for a full five minutes. Shorter blasts were then emitted at 6.00 a.m., 9.30 a.m., 9.50 a.m., 1.30 p.m., 2.00 p.m., 5.30 p.m., 5.50 p.m., 9.30 p.m. and finally at 10.00 p.m.!

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 July, 1939
DEATH TWO YEARS AFTER ACCIDENT.

John Tinney, miner, Long Row, Denend, Cardenden, who was injured in a pit accident nearly two years ago, died in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital at midnight on Friday. The accident occurred in Bowhill Colliery on 29th September 1937, and Tinney was taken to hospital suffering from injuries to his back. He was 36 years of age and married.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 July, 1939
ACCIDENT IN BOWHILL PIT.

As a result of a shot-firing accident in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Cardenden, on Thursday, Thomas Smith, aged about 40, 11th Street, Bowhill, was seriously injured. He received the full force of the explosion. He was rushed to Edinburgh Infirmary suffering from multiple injuries. His condition is critical.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 October, 1939

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Thomas Smith, 15 Eleventh Street, Bowhill, who died on 3rd August at the Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, from the effects of injuries received by him in his working-place in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., on 26th July, caused by his being struck by material projected from a shot. Those giving evidence included James P. Crichton, stripper, 23 School Lane, Lochgelly. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 September, 1939
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

A 19-year-old Cardenden miner, Richard Hogg, 9 Balgreggie Park, was fatally injured on Wednesday when he was struck by two runaway hutches. The accident occurred at Bowhill No. 2 Colliery shortly after Hogg had exchanged jobs with a workmate. He received body injuries and was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital, but died shortly after admission.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 October, 1939
COLLIERY APPOINTMENTS.

Mr John Clark, who for the last fifteen years has been manager of the Fife Coal Company's Bowhill Colliery, has been transferred to a similar position at the Frances Colliery, Dysart. Mr Andrew B. Sanderson, manager of the Frances Colliery, has been appointed to Bowhill Colliery.
Mr George Richardson has been appointed under-manager at the Aitken Colliery No. 1 Colliery; and Mr John Bennet has received a similar appointment at Lumphinnans No. XI Pit.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 October, 1939

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Richard Robertson McKechnie Hogg, coal miner, 9 Balgreggie Park, Cardenden, who died on 30th August at Kirkcaldy Hospital from the effects of injuries received by him that day in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., caused by his being struck by a runaway hutch. Those giving evidence included Robert Leitch (19), 10 Gammie Place, Cardenden, and James Robertson, 5 Denend Park, Dundonald.
The Sheriff said he would add to a formal verdict a finding that the runaway was due to the chain which fastened to the hook on the drawbar of one of the two hutches which were being let down the dook coming off the hook; and that a stop block near the front of the dook would probably have prevented the runaway hutch from striking Hogg.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 November, 1939
BOWHILL MINERS CEASE WORK.

A strike involving 1800 miners took place on Thursday afternoon at Bowhill Colliery, Cardenden (Fife Coal Company, Ltd.). The dispute is in connection with wages paid to a certain section of men. Following a meeting at the pithead the men did not start the afternoon shift.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 December, 1939
BOWHILL PITHEAD WORKER KILLED.

William Hutchison (60), pithead worker, Inglis Hall, Annfield, Cardenden, was killed in an accident at the pithead at Bowhill Colliery on Saturday. Hutchison was coming off duty about noon when he was knocked down by a train of waggons which was being shunted by a colliery locomotive. Deceased is survived by his wife and one son.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 January, 1940
DIED AT HIS WORK.

Edward Graham Arthur (52), waggon shunter, Arthur Cottage, Jamphlars, Cardenden, died suddenly while at his work at the pithead at Bowhill Colliery on Thursday afternoon. Arthur had been working near the washery, and at about half-past five his brother, who is also employed at the colliery, found that he had suddenly taken ill. A doctor was summoned, but Arthur died almost immediately.

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"Cowdenbeath Advertiser"
25 April, 1940

Mr W. Reid, an under-manager at Bowhill Colliery, has been appointed manager at No. 7 Colliery, Cowdenbeath, in succession to Mr H. Black, who has been appointed to a similar position at Valleyfield Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 May, 1940
COWDENBEATH MINER'S ESCAPE.

While working in Bowhill Colliery on Monday, Alexander Gillespie, 3 Glenburn Place, Cowdenbeath, had a narrow escape from serious injury. He was struck by a sudden fall from the roof but escaped with a sprained ankle and a slight injury to the right arm.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 May, 1940

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named David Brown, 12 Cluny Square, Cardenden, who died in Kirkcaldy Hospital on 10th April from toxaemia, cardiac failure, and tetanus infection, resulting from a wound in his left hand, sustained by him on 22nd March in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence included: Dr Baigrie, Edinburgh, resident M.O. in Kirkcaldy Hospital; Michael Stewart Gibbon, miner, 23 Fifteenth Street, Bowhill; Robert Inglis, miner, Hall Street, Lochgelly; George Marshall, colliery fireman, 4 Orebank Cottages, Cardenden; Allan Hutt, first-aid attendant, 16 Balgonie Terrace, Cardenden; and James L. Brown, miner, a brother of deceased.
The Sheriff found that the cause of death was as set forth in the petition.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 May, 1940

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named James Murphy, 32 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, who died on 15th February in Kirkcaldy Hospital from injuries received on 13th February in the underground workings of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., caused by the framework of a haulage wheel falling on him. Those giving evidence included: John Mitchell, colliery fireman, 69 Woodend Park, Cardenden; and James Christie, oncost worker, Woodend Park, Cardenden. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 July, 1940
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

While at work in the Diamond Section of No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Wednesday morning, John Mitchell (30), 7 Carden Crescent, Cardenden, was accident killed. He was engaged as a stower, when a large stretch of stone, weighing several tons, unexpectedly came away from the roof and fell on top of him. Death must have been instantaneous. Deceased was a married man, and is survived by his wife and a family of three young children.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 September, 1940

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Gilchrist and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Mitchell (36), 7 Carden Crescent, Cardenden, who was killed on 24th July by a roof fall in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence included: John Johnstone, miner, 67 Dundonald Park, Cardenden, and James McLean, mining contractor, 18 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 December, 1940
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

Robert Stewart (38), miner, 17 Dundonald Den, Cardenden, was killed while at work in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Wednesday. He had been putting in roof supports when a large stone came away and struck him on the head, fracturing his skull. Deceased leaves a widow and one child.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 February, 1941

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday before Sheriff MacLean into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Robert Dawson Stewart, 17 Dundonald Den, Cardenden, who was killed on 18th December in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery of the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., by a fall from the roof of his working-place. Those giving evidence included Matthew H. Henderson, miner, Front Row, Denend, Dundonald, and David Arnott, underground fireman, Burnfoot Cottage, Cluny Road, Cardenden. A formal verdict was recorded by the Sheriff.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 March, 1942
BOWHILL COLLIERY ACCIDENT.

James Burns, miner, 37 Balgreggie Park, Cardenden, was seriously injured while at work on night-shift in Bowhill Colliery. He was caught by a heavy fall of stone, and on being released it was found that he had received fractures of both legs and other injuries. He was removed to Kirkcaldy Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 June, 1942
BOWHILL COLLIERY FATALITY.

A fatal accident took place in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Saturday morning. The victim was John Brown (65), oncost worker, residing at 11 Twelfth Street, Bowhill. In course of his work he was knocked down by a runaway hutch. His skull was fractured and death was almost instantaneous.
Mr Brown was an experienced workman, and much sympathy has been expressed for his invalid wife, and for the family. At the funeral, the services were conducted by the Rev. A. Ross, Cardenden.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 June, 1942
PIT ACCIDENTS.

... Fatal accidents in collieries were the subject of the remaining four inquiries, in each of which the Sheriff [MacLean] entered a formal verdict.
The inquiries concerned the deaths of John McClelland, colliery shaftsman, 111 Dundonald Park, Cardenden, who died on11th May in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from the effects of injuries received that day in the winding shaft of No. 2 Pit, Jenny Gray Colliery, Lochgelly, caused by his being struck by a piece of coal which had fallen down the shaft; James Thomson, miner, Leslie Place, Station Road, Kelty, who died on 4th June in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received on 22nd May in the underground workings of the Lindsay Colliery, Kelty, in course of his occupation as an oiler and greaser, caused by his being crushed between two races of hutches; John Kelly, miner, 10 Melville Street, Lochgelly, who died on 11th June in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital from injuries received on 10th June as the result of a roof fall in his working-place in course of his employment as a prop shifter in the Jenny Gray Pit, Lochgelly; and John Brown, miner, 11 Twelfth Street, Bowhill, who was fatally injured on 13th June in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, by being struck by a hutch, which in turn had been struck by a runaway race of hutches.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 August, 1942
PIT ACCIDENTS.

... James Dick, miner, David Place, Cardenden, received serious injury to his back as the result of being caught by a heavy fall of coal while at work in Bowhill Colliery. After receiving medical attention at the colliery, he was removed to hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 November, 1942
MINER'S SUDDEN DEATH IN PIT.

Alexander Hill (48), oncost worker, 3 Denfield Drive, Dundonald, died suddenly yesterday morning in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Shortly before five o'clock Hill was making his way to the pit bottom, when he collapsed and died almost immediately.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 December, 1942

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday before Sheriff MacLean into the circumstances attending the death of Alexander Hill, colliery roadsman, 3 Denfield Drive, Dundonald, who died on 13th November in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Those giving evidence included: Mrs Ella Hill, widow of the deceased; Samuel Marshall, miner, 28 Seventeenth Street, Bowhill; William Harley, oncost worker, 21 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill; Andrew Miller, colliery roadsman, 51 Denfield Gardens, Dundonald; and Dr Alex. S. Cuthbert, Cardenden. A formal verdict was recorded by the Sheriff.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 January, 1943

As a result of the adoption of a "ca' canny" policy by men employed as strippers at Bowhill Colliery, the Fife Coal Co., Ltd., owners of the colliery, availed themselves of the provisions of the Essential Work Order on Monday and dismissed 41 men from their employment. ...

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"The Scotsman"
24 February, 1943
Wages Dispute at Bowhill

Mr Gallacher (Comm., West Fife) called attention to the recent wages dispute at Bowhill Colliery, Fife, and a subsequent dismissal of strippers at the pit. He said Bowhill was a highly paid pit in the district, and alleged that the Fife Coal Co. were determined to break the wages in the pits down to the minimum in the district, and had been pursuing this policy at Bowhill for several years.
Mr Gallacher contended that Lord Traprain was endorsing the policy of the Fife Coal Company.
Major Lloyd George (Minister of Fuel and Power) said he could not go into the merits of this dispute at the moment, because it was a matter that must be left to the existing machinery. Where he quarrelled with Mr Gallacher was because the latter charged the Controller, without any justification whatever, of being a party to a policy to cut rates. He had shown no tittle of evidence for that, because the dispute in the first instance went to arbitration at the men's request. If one party to arbitration would not accept the decision but held the reservation that they would only accept it if it went one way, what was to become of arbitration at all? It would be a deplorable thing.

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"Dunfermline Press"
Saturday, 24 April, 1943

CARDENDEN MINER KILLED

George Harley (42), packer, 49 Dundonald Park, Cardenden, was killed on Thursday forenoon when a large stone fell upon him from the roof of his working place in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery.

[A formal verdict was returned after an inquiry at Dunfermline Sheriff Court, held on 13 May, into the death of George Fair Harley, miner, killed on 22nd April.]

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 June, 1943

John Grant (36), hole borer, 8 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, was killed while at work in Bowhill Colliery on Wednesday. A large stone fell from the roof and partly buried him. On being extricated by workmates, he was found to be severely crushed, and he died while being carried on a stretcher to the pithead.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 July, 1943

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff MacLean and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of John Kirkcaldy Grant, hole borer, 8 Eighteenth Street, Bowhill, who was killed on 16 June in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, as the result of a fall of material from the roof of his working place. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included William Philp, colliery fireman, 23 Brucefield Terrace, Lochgelly. The Sheriff recorded a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 August, 1943

George Forsyth (27), clipper, 40 Denfield Drive, Cardenden, was fatally injured on Wednesday morning as the result of an accident in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. Forsyth was at work in the basin deep haulage when the haulage rope broke and he was caught and crushed between the hutches. He was so seriously injured that he died almost immediately.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 September, 1943

David Mitchell (34), miner, 10 East Row, Hill of Beath, was fatally injured as the result of an accident on a haulage road in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. He succumbed to his injuries while being conveyed to the pithead.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 October, 1943

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff MacLean and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a colliery worker named George Galloway Forsyth, 40 Denfield Drive, Cardenden, who was killed on 25 August in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, in course of his occupation as a clipper, by being crushed by a runaway race of hutches. Those giving evidence included:- David Young, clipper, 9 Mid Row, Cardenden; Robert Carswell, haulage motorman, 52 Dundonald Park, Dundonald; Alexander Young, colliery rope splicer, 21 Fourth Street, Bowhill; and Alexander Brown, oversman, 4 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill. Sheriff MacLean, giving a formal verdict, said he did not think he had got the whole of the evidence about the block or the rope or the man-hole. On what was before him, he did not think it was safe to make a finding one way or another, about their condition.
A formal verdict was also recorded after inquiry into the death of David Izatt Mitchell, miner, who died on 17 September in the underground workings of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, having been fatally injured by the fall of an iron roof girder in his working place, in the course of his occupation as a haulage attendant. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 February, 1944

Mr D. McAinsh, resigned from the position of oversman at the colliery owing to ill health. There was a presentation to him at a social meeting in the Gothenburg supper room at Auchterderran.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 April, 1944
BOWHILL MINER DIES FROM INJURIES

Thomas Murdoch Taylor (59), oncost worker, Newton Cottages, Balgreggie Park, Cardenden, died in Larbert Hospital on Saturday from injuries sustained in an accident the previous day at No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery. An endless rope attached to a train of loaded hutches broke. The hutches ran backward and struck Taylor, who was severely injured about the lower part of the body and legs.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 May, 1944

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff MacLean and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Thomas Murdoch Taylor, miner, Newton Cottages, Balgreggie Road, Cardenden, who died on 15 April in Larbert Hospital from injuries received on 14 April in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, caused by his being struck and crushed by a runaway race of hutches. Those giving evidence included:- William Bewick, oncost worker; Thomas Caruthers, oncost worker; Thomas Finnie, colliery manager; and William Watson, fireman. The Sheriff recorded a formal verdict.

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"Cowdenbeath Advertiser"
20 April, 1945
KELTY COLLIERY MANAGER HONOURED

Mr John Fleming, manager of the Aitken Colliery, was met by officials and workmen in the Gothenburg supper-room on Saturday evening and presented with a wallet and Treasury notes, on his being appointed to a higher position at Bowhill Colliery.
Mr George Pollock, under manager, presided, and Mr R. Stevenson, who has a life-long connection with the Aitken Colliery, made the presentation. Mr Fleming has a long service as manager at Blairenbathie, No. 11 Lumphinnans, and Aitken Collieries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 June, 1946
BOWHILL COLLIERY FATALITY.

George Lawson (37), 30 Fourteenth Street, Bowhill, was instantaneously killed in Bowhill Colliery on Monday evening. Deceased was employed in No. 10 East Section, East Dook, of No. 1 Pit, when a fall occurred from the roof.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 August, 1946
FIFE COAL COMPANY.
MANAGERIAL CHANGES.

Yesterday the Fife Coal Company, Ltd., announced the following managerial changes:- Mr T. Duncan, production engineer, to manager, Bowhill Colliery; Mr J. K. Kennedy, manager, Bowhill, to Wellsgreen. Mr G. Buchan, Wellsgreen, to Benarty Mine. Mr G. Marshall, Benarty, to Blairenbathie Mine.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 September, 1946
BOWHILL PIT FATALITY.

George Morrice (27), brusher, 4 Back Row, Cardenden, was fatally injured in the Main Haulage Dook, No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday afternoon, when he was jammed between a hutch and a trap door.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 November, 1946
BOWHILL COLLIERY ACCIDENT.

John Howie, pithead worker, Balgreggie Park, Cardenden, was severely injured at Bowhill Colliery on Thursday when he was crushed by two loaded hutches. He sustained injuries to the legs and thigh, and was taken to hospital at Larbert.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 December, 1946
FATAL ACCIDENT INQUIRY.
FORMAL VERDICT.

Sheriff Hamilton, after hearing evidence as to the circumstances surrounding the death of George Morrice, 4 Back Row, Cardenden, on 16th September 1946, in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, returned a formal verdict. Morrice died from rupture of the heart as a result of injuries sustained in the course of his industrial employment as a coal miner by the Fife Coal Company, having been crushed between an empty coal hutch and the frame of the trap-door in the man-haulage dook.
Mr J. P. Hall represented the Inspector of Mines, Mr J. Ayslop the employers, and Mr A. Mitchell the relatives of the deceased man at the inquiry, which took place in Dunfermline Sheriff Court on Thursday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
Saturday, 11 January, 1947

The National Coal Board flag was unveiled at Bowhill Colliery on Sunday afternoon by Mr John Herd and Adam Drummond, the oldest working miner and the youngest boy, respectively, at the pit.

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While working in No. 2 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, on Monday morning, John Mitchell, Jamphlars, Cardenden, sustained a compound fracture of the thigh. He was conveyed to hospital at Bridge of Earn.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 February, 1947

Struck by a stone which fell from the roof in the East Diamond Section of No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, early on Tuesday morning, David McDonald (25), chock drawer, 9 Nineteenth Street, Bowhill, sustained a fracture of the skull, to which he succumbed almost immediately. McDonald leaves a widow and two young children.
John Ormiston, well-known in Fife junior football circles, and right-half of Bowhill Rovers, who was working with him at the time, received leg injuries. Day shift workers were idle on Tuesday as a token of respect.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 February, 1947

A formal verdict was returned at the fatal accident Enquiry, held in Dunfermline, into the death of David Cowe Davidson McDonald, coal miner, 9 Nineteenth Street, Cardenden, who died on 28th January in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, owned and worked by the National Coal Board, from a fracture of the base of the skull, sustained in the course of his employment as a coal miner, by being pinned to the ground by a fall of stone from the roof of the pit.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 February, 1947
MINER'S SUDDEN DEATH

George Duncan (51), colliery packer, 48 Denfield Drive, Dundonald, Cardenden, was found dead at his working place in No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, yesterday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 April, 1947

At the Sheriff Court in Dunfermline the Sheriff returned a formal verdict in the following case:-
George Williamson Duncan, colliery packer, 48 Denfield Drive, Dundonald, Cardenden, who died on 31st January, at No. 1 Pit, Bowhill Colliery, Cardenden, from rupture of congenital aneurism of anterior communicating cerebral artery with consequent Haemorrhage, sustained by him in the course of his industrial employment as a colliery packer by the National Coal Board.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 March, 1948
MINERS' AMBULANCE COMPETITION

Bowhill Colliery ambulance team scored a notable victory at Dunfermline on Saturday when they won the Miners' Welfare Trophy from an entry of ten teams. Michael Colliery were 2nd and Blairhall 3rd.
The trophy was handed over at a social meeting held in Dunfermline Co-operative Society tea rooms after the competition by Mr Steel, Divisional Inspector of Mines, to Mr Robert Inglis, captain of the team.
The members of Bowhill team were: - Robert Inglis (captain), John Johnstone, David Anderson, William Young, James Meek, and Allan Hutt (reserve).

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"Cowdenbeath Advertiser & Kelty News"
4 September, 1949
FORMER COLLIERY MANAGER DEAD

Mr Thomas Welsh, a native of the district and a former under-manager of Bowhill Colliery, under the late Robert Muir, died in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary on Saturday. Mr Welsh, who resided at 3 Burns Crescent, Harthill, was well-known in Lochgelly and Cowdenbeath as well as in Cardenden.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 February, 1950
FIFE COAL DEVELOPMENTS

Mr George Mullin, general manager of the Fife and Clackmannan Area of the National Coal Board, released information on some of the planned developments for Fife collieries at a Press conference held in the Central Workshops, Cowdenbeath, on Tuesday. ... In addition, Mr Mullin gave the information that reconstruction schemes were in progress for the purpose of increasing output and efficiency. ... At Bowhill Colliery, a large scheme of both surface and underground reconstruction was being carried out to increase the output from 1250 to 1600 tons per day by the end of 1952 or the beginning of 1953.. ...

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Coal from Bowhill Colliery was used in the boilers at Guardbridge Paper Mill, near St Andrews. William MacLeod, former chief engineer at the mill, has kindly sent analysis details on the incoming coal which was evaluated on its arrival.

COAL REPORT
Fuel: Bowhill
Supplier: N.C.B.
Laboratory Reference: 40/50
Sampled ex: Wagons
Date received: 26.6.1950
Date Tested: 27.6.1950
THERMAL VALUES
Calorific Value: 9,200 B.T.U's/lb.
Evaporative Power: 9.5 lbs
Moisture: 21.2 % Volatile Matter (less Moisture): 24.4 % Fixed Carbon: 40.7 % Ash: 13.7 %

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 July, 1950
SHOT-FIRING COMPETITION
Winners' High Marks

The final of the N.C.B. Central Sub-Area shot-firing competition was held at Lochgelly Workshops, when 12 finalists took part, three from each agent's group.
The finalists qualified from an entry of 250 competitors drawn from collieries between Wellwood and Kinglassie.
The competition, arranged in the interests of safer shot-firing in the mines, was organised by Mr H. G. McGuire, sub-area safety and training officer, who was complimented on his realistic surface production of a double unit coal face section, having all the underground conditions.
The adjudicators were Mr John Millar, planning engineer, and Mr Wm. Gemmell, training centre manager.
They selected the winners as follows:- 1 Peter Orr, Lumphinnans No. XI Colliery; 2 Wm. Young, Bowhill Colliery; 3 John Robertson, Glencraig Colliery.
Mr Gemmell complimented the men on the high standard attained in the competition. It had been a difficult task to select the winners as the highest mark was 97 and the lowest 75.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 August, 1950
TOWARDS GREATER SAFETY IN MINES
Shot-Firing Competition

The second annual shot-firing competition of the Fife and Clackmannan area of the N.C.B. was conducted at Mossbeath Training Centre, Cowdenbeath, on Wednesday evening when nine competitors, out of an original entry of 300, contested the final stage.
The prize-winners were:- 1 Wm. Young, Bowhill, 161½ pts; 2 P. Orr, Lumphinnans No. XI Colliery, 152½ pts; 3 A. Crawford, Frances Colliery, Dysart, 147½ pts.
Mr L. R. Milligan, area production manager, presided at the presentation of prizes which was made by Mr H. R. Houston, H.M. Divisional Inspector of Mines for Scotland.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 November, 1950
YOUNG MINER'S SUDDEN DEATH
Inquiry Leaves Cause Unexplained

How a perfectly healthy 26-year-old miner died of acute heart failure while working underground in Bowhill Colliery on 31st August was left unexplained after a public inquiry before Sheriff Hamilton and a jury at Dunfermline Sheriff Court yesterday.
The jury returned a formal verdict that John Boyd Gray, 30 Thirteenth Street, Bowhill, died of acute heart failure and pulmonary congestion, adding that there was not sufficient evidence to say what the cause of death was. ...

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"Reunion of Retired Miners"
1951/52


This photograph was sent by one of our visitors - Elaine Tayefeh (nee Millar) from California, USA - who lost an uncle, Alex. (Eck) Millar, in an accident at Bowhill pit in 1932. It includes her uncle Bob Millar (extreme right, back row) at a reunion of the retired miners from Bowhill Pit. She thinks it was taken around 1951 or 1952.

Can you recognise any other faces in these photographs?

This one (date unknown) was also sent by Elaine with her uncle Bob Millar third from the right, second row top.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 December, 1951
MINING DEVELOPMENTS IN WEST FIFE
New shaft at Bowhill Colliery

The West Fife area is scheduled for one of the major sinkings which the National Coal Board have planned for Scotland. The project involves the sinking of a new shaft near the existing Bowhill Colliery, and the scheme will take the place of the proposed new sinking at Westfield.
The new shaft has a designed output of over 3000 tons per day, and will be winding coal from two locomotive haulage roads driven at different levels toward the deep coal seams lying between the present Bowhill workings and the Ochil Fault to the north.
The output from the new shaft will be handled together with the output from the existing fitting. The surface equipment at Bowhill Colliery will be completely reorganised for this purpose. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 June, 1952
Bowhill Miner Killed

A shot-firing accident occurred at Bowhill Colliery, on Monday evening, as the result of which George Crichton, miner, 54 Whitehall Drive, Cardenden, was fatally injured. The accident happened in No. 5 East Section, Smiddy Coal, No. 2 Pit, about 7 pm. Deceased was a married man with four of a family, two of whom are working.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 October, 1952
Presentation to Colliery Official

Mr George Davidson, former under-manager at Bowhill Colliery, who has been promoted to the post of manager at Blairmuckhill Colliery, Harthill, Lanarkshire, was the guest of honour at a social gathering of Bowhill Colliery officials and workers in Bowhill Gothenburg supper room on Saturday evening. Mr George Marshall, colliery manager, who presided, wished Mr Davidson success in his new appointment. ... A comprehensive vote of thanks was proposed by Mr Tom Harrison, present under-manager at Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 December, 1952
Collieries Will Be Reconstructed
Modernisation Schemes ...

.... BOWHILL AND GLENCRAIG

Development and reconstruction work is also proceeding at Bowhill Colliery, where since the sinking of the new No. 3 shaft began on 6th August, the excavation for the shaft collar has been started. The reinforced concrete shaft collar will be completed shortly after the New Year. The contract for the sinking has now been placed, and the firm is now busy on the site preparing for the temporary workshops and concreting batching plant, etc. The sinking headgear and winder will be installed early in the New Year and sinking proper will start immediately thereafter. The new shaft will be 24 feet in diameter, concrete-lined, and sunk to a depth of 460 fathoms.
Considerable progress has also been made with the work of reconstruction at Glencraig Colliery. The N.C.B. states that -
"On the surface the dirt disposal arrangements were completed and are now working satisfactorily. The contract for the complete reconstruction of the surface has been placed. Work will start during 1953 and be completed during 1954. The transporter carriage system will be used to transport mine cars from the cage to the tipplers and the coal will be belt conveyed to the preparation plant. Pneumatic decking rams will be used.
"Satisfactory progress has been made with the enlarging and regarding of the main roadways to make them suitable for locomotive haulage. Reconstruction of the pit bottom and siding is nearing completion."

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 July, 1953

The death took place on Monday evening of Mr Robert Gibson, Carden Castle Park, Cardenden. Mr Gibson, who was employed underground at Bowhill Colliery, took ill at work and died shortly afterwards. Deceased was 60 years of age.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 July, 1953
Bowhill Colliery Modernisation
Haulage System is Being Brought Up-to-Date

While Bowhill miners enjoy their fortnight's holiday, the final stage of modernisation of the fifty-year-old colliery fittings are being undertaken and the entire process of replacing the old haulage system by the installation of up-to-date equipment will have been completed in readiness for the first shift on the miners' return to work.
As the last shift left the pit to start their vacation, a squad of men, including colliery staff and engineering workers from the National Coal Board workshops at Cowdenbeath, took over at the bottom of No. 2 shaft, where, 166 fathoms below the surface, the men have been working the Lochgelly Splint coal, using the 9-cwt tubs for haulage.
In the fourteen days of the holidays, this squad of 60 will be engaged by day and night in changing over the fittings to the new system of two-ton cars and automatic control. The work in No. 2 shaft involves the reorganising of the pi-bottom and mouth of the shaft by the installation of two transporter carriages, four creepers, and three power rams.
The plate at the bottom will be replaced with a new platform raised three feet above the existing level. To supplant the gravity haulage some 500 yards of conveyor belt is being put in to feed the new mine cars at a point some 150 yards from the bottom.

OUTPUT WAS MAINTAINED

No. 1 shaft, sunk to 218 fathoms to work the Dunfermline Splint coal, has already been converted, the operation causing the stoppage of production for some five months. Preparations for the change-over in No. 2 shaft have been going on for several months while the management and workers achieved the extremely difficult task of maintaining unbroken output in this part of the colliery.
The effect of these changes provides for the more economical haulage working and for the handling of anticipated higher output, the immediate effect being the release of some 50 men from the haulage systems in both shafts to essentially productive work.
The installation of modern haulage equipment at these shafts is only part of a major development plan for the colliery. The conversion project emanated from a visit to America during the war of Fife Coal Company officials, Mr H. King (now production director, Scottish Division, N.C.B.) and Mr J. R. Buchanan (now production manager, Lothians area). On their report, plans were drawn up in 1945, and it is this project, with slight variations, which the National Coal Board have now acted upon.

IMPROVING EFFICIENCY OF TRANSPORT

The main purpose of the scheme is to improve the efficiency of the transport arrangements by belt conveyor systems to central loading points, the introduction of mine cars, locomotives, large balanced rope haulages to deal with the dip coal, and the use of labour-saving, mechanical devices for handling these mine cars underground.
The surface arrangements so far as the transport of coal from the cage to the screening plant is concerned will be largely reorganised. The loaded and empty cars will be transported between the cages and the mine car tipplers by transporter carriages. The coal will be conveyed from the tipplers to the screening plant by a new belt conveyor system.
When first approved, it was estimated that the cost of the reconstruction work would be in the region of £342,000, but the intervening rise in the cost of materials and labour will result in the final figure exceeding that estimate by a considerable sum.
In addition to the reconstruction of Nos. 1 and 2 shafts, the N.C.B. have decided upon a major development at the colliery which entails the sinking of a third shaft to work the coal seams down to 460 fathoms, thereby nullifying the original scheme for a new fitting, for which surface and underground workings lay-out plans have been prepared, at Westfield, to work the seams below the 250 fathoms' level.
The third shaft, which was begun last August, is now down 73 feet, and early estimates are that it will be some ten years before this shaft gets into production.
Meantime, Nos. 1 and 2 shafts' workings will be confined to the 218 and 166 fathoms' horizons respectively. All coal will now be won to the rise of these horizons in accordance with the system of horizon mining successfully followed elsewhere.

AN ALL-ELECTRIC COLLIERY

When No. 3 shaft is sunk, level stone mines will be driven at the 360 and 440 fathom's levels to reach the Westfield seams, coal being won from lateral and crosscut sections and transported along the roads to the pit bottom by locomotives and mine cars. At the surface, the coal from No. 3 shaft will be conveyed by belt along with the coal from Nos. 1 and 2 shafts to a new preparation plant capable of dealing with 500 tons per hour. The steam engines at both Nos. 1 and 2 shafts will be replaced by electric winders, and the colliery will then be all-electric, with the necessary extension of the power station. The over-all output aimed at from this field of 30 million tons reserve is 5000 tons, with average output per manshift of 35 cwts from the 3000 men employed.
A Dunfermline Press representative was among a party of visitors shown over the colliery by Mr John B. H. Fleming, agent for Bowhill, Minto, and Kinglassie collieries; Mr George Marshall, colliery manager, and other pit officials.
Mr Fleming explained that the present production was 25 to 26 cwts per manshift. No. 1 shaft had been closed in July last year and there had been no production from this source till January, on the completion of the conversion to up-to-date haulage methods. From No. 2 pit they had been averaging 21 cwts per manshift with the help of men from No. 1, and when these men had returned to No. 1 in January output had risen to the 25-26 cwt level.

SAVING OF MANPOWER

Mr Fleming said that, with the transfer of men from mechanisation to production made possible by the conversion and the speed-up effected by the new installations, it was hoped that output would be raised to 30 cwt per manshift. The saving of manpower in both pits would total 50, which was equivalent to starting a new section. It was expected that the present output of 1650-1700 tons from the 1350 men employed in the colliery would go up to 1800 or 1900 tons.
At the surface of No. 1 shaft, the visitors saw the new system in operation. One man in a transporter carriage operated four mine cars, transferring the loaded cars to the tipplers and returning the empty cars to the pit bottom. As the transporter carried the cars into position, power rams moved the empty and loaded cars in and out of the cage and the tipplers, the whole action being automatic. The operator was actually controlling cars some 12 feet from his cabin.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 January, 1954
MAKING WEST FIFE PITS UP-TO-DATE

BOWHILL No. 3 SINKING

... In connection with the sinking of No. 3 shaft at Bowhill Colliery, the reinforced concrete shaft collar and the excavation to the rockhead at 70 feet depth has been completed. The sinking headgear, winding engine, and all the various buildings and equipment required for shaft sinking have been installed. The actual sinking of the 24 feet diameter shaft beyond the rockhead started in August 1953, and at the end of 1953 had reached a depth of approximately 50 fathoms. The ultimate depth of this No. 3 shaft will be 460 fathoms, with horizons at 360 fathoms and 440 fathoms. To enable coal to be wound from either horizon, a clutch drum winder will be installed capable of raising four 2½ ton mine cars at each wind. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 January, 1954
Pit Sinker's Fatal Fall in Shaft
Tripped Over Iron Bar

How a pit sinker tripped over an iron bar and fell headlong to his death at the bottom of the No. 3 shaft at present being sunk at Bowhill Colliery was described by workmates at Dunfermline Sheriff Court when Sheriff Middleton and a jury investigated the circumstances of the fatality.
The deceased pit sinker was Patrick O'Donnell (22), 157 Station Road, Lochgelly, whose parents reside in County Donegal.
Those giving evidence on the incident, which took place on 17th December 1953, included:- William Oliver (30), mining engineer, 369 Valley Gardens, Kirkcaldy; Alex. Hynd (40), pit sinker, 10 Alexander Place, Jamphlars, Cardenden; and Charles Gormley (30), pit sinker, 224 Broad Street, Cowdenbeath.
The jury returned a formal verdict that O'Donnell died from multiple fractures of the skull sustained in the course of his occupation when he fell from the platform to the bottom of the shaft.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 April, 1954
Miners' Ambulance Competition
Bowhill Team Qualifies for Scottish Finals.

It was stated at the senior ambulance competition of the West Fife Area, National Coal Board, held in the Carnegie Gymnasium, Dunfermline, on Saturday, that the Area had again won first prize in the Scottish Division for their record of safety in pits.
Announcing this, Mr James Hutchison, area production manager, said that the West Fife Area accident rate was 1200 manshifts per accident. It was hoped to improve on this. In Britain, the Scottish Division of the N.C.B. occupied about third place for pit safety.
The competition was won by Bowhill Colliery No. 2 team, with 525 pts out of a possible 600. The team, comprising Wm. Shaw (capt.), Wm. Johnston, Andrew McCormack, Alex. Holmes, and Wm. Russell (res.), will now go forward to compete in the Scottish finals at Glasgow. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 April, 1954
Presentation to Former Colliery Manager

Mr George Marshall, former manager at Bowhill Colliery for three years and now agent for the Dysart area collieries, was the guest of honour along with Mrs Marshall, at a social gathering held in the Auld Hoose Rooms. Mr Tom Harrison, deputy manager at Bowhill Colliery presided. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 April, 1954
Death of Former Colliery Manager

Mr Robert Brown, former district manager and agent of the United Collieries, Ltd., Glasgow, who died at his home, 29 Comely Bank Street, Edinburgh, last Friday, at the age of 86, was the oldest member of a Kelty family, several of whom took up coal mining as a career.
Mr Brown was under-manager for some years at the Aitken Pit, Kelty, then removed to Bowhill where he ultimately became manager in 1908. In 1910 he was promoted to district manager and agent with the United Collieries and served with them till his retirement in 1939. ... He leaves a family of four daughters and three sons, two of whom are following the same career as their father.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 January, 1955
Promotion for Two Colliery Officials

Two oversmen in Bowhill Colliery who attended the Fife Mining College, Cowdenbeath, together and have been close friends have been promoted to under-managers. They are Mr Andrew Blake, 84 Carden Castle Park, Cardenden, who is a dayshift oversman at the colliery and has been appointed under-manager at Bowhill No. 1 Colliery; and Mr Robert Maxwell, 56 Whitehall Avenue, Cardenden, who is nightshift oversman at Bowhill Colliery, and has been appointed under-manager at Blairhall Colliery. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 July, 1955
Well-Known Mining Official Retires

One of Fife's best known and most popular mining officials, Mr John Fleming, colliery agent for Bowhill, Kinglassie and Minto Collieries, retired this week after 48 years' service in the mining industry.
The son of Mr David Fleming, who moved from Clunie to Kelty, Mr Fleming was 14 years of age when he started work in the Aitken Colliery with his father. In 1912 he gained a first-class manager's certificate at the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh. The first world war interrupted his career and he served for the four years with the Motor Transport Company in France, before returning to the Fife coalfields.
In 1920 he was appointed manager of the Lassodie Mill Pit, and later became assistant manager at the Mary Colliery, Lochore. He became manager at Blairenbathie Colliery, and afterwards held managerial appointments at Valleyfield, Dalbeath, and the Aitken Colliery, before becoming agent of the Fife Coal Company's Aitken, Mary, Bowhill and Benarty collieries.
After nationalisation, with his headquarters at Bowhill Colliery, he was appointed agent of the Bowhill, Kinglassie and Minto collieries, and has been prominently associated with the work of reconstruction at Bowhill Collieries Nos. 1 and 2. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 July, 1955

... Work is taking place meantime on a big power extension at Bowhill Colliery. Good progress is being made there with the sinking of the new No. 3 shaft. A depth of 1400 feet has now been reached, just about 100 feet each month. A mechanical grab has been introduced to expedite the work at the pit bottom where formerly the earth was being shifted by hand. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 August, 1955
Colliery Nurse Was Miners' Friend

The miners at Bowhill Colliery are losing a friend as well as a nurse when Nursing Sister Elizabeth Warner leaves the colliery this weekend to have a short holiday before she emigrates to Australia next month. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 November, 1955
Bowhill 50-Year-Old Rows Are Being Demolished

Some of the old miners' rows at Bowhill, built just over half a century ago, will soon be disappearing. Demolition work has begun in Eighth to Eleventh Streets, and new houses will be erected by Fife County Council on part of the cleared area. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 February, 1956
Retired After 54 Years' Pit Service

Mr John Keddie, who resides in Lochgelly, and has been employed in Bowhill Colliery for 54 years, has retired. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 March, 1956
Bowhill Win Pit First-Aid Contest
Will Go Forward to Divisional Finals

Bowhill No. 1 won the area final of the senior eliminating ambulance competitions of the N.C.B. West Fife area which was held in the Central Baths, Dunfermline, on Saturday.
The results were as follows:- 1 Bowhill No. 1 (oral 192, practical 131, team test 164), 487; 2 Bowhill No. 2 (oral 192, practical 126, team test 143), 461; 3 Blairhall (oral 158, practical 131, team test, 147), 436. The members of the winning team were A. Robertson, W. Shaw, A. McCormick, J. Meek, and W. Young. ... Other teams who took part and their pointage were:- Minto, 398 pts; Lumphinnans No. XI, 376; Aitken, 332.
Bowhill also won the individual competitions in which R. Inglis, W. Shaw, A. McCormack, and J. Meek were placed first in their appropriate sections.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 April, 1956

Mr W. Kinnell, from the Jenny Gray Colliery, has taken up duty at Kinglassie Colliery as chief mechanical engineer in succession to Mr J. Allan, who is now chief engineer at Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 May, 1956
Retired After 64 Years' Pit Service

When 77-year-old Mr Alex. Hynd, 95 Sixteenth Street, Bowhill, retired from work at Bowhill Colliery, he completed 64 years' service in the mining industry. He came to Bowhill in 1904, and was previously employed at Townhill Colliery, and at the sinking of Sunnybraes Colliery, Saline.
At Bowhill Colliery he was employed in operating and maintaining machinery plant and was underground machinery inspector for 15 years.
For the last 27 years he was employed on the main pumping plant of the colliery. For 36 years he was branch secretary of the Scottish Colliery Enginemen, Boilermen and Tradesmen's Association, from whom he received a gift on his retirement from that office. He has received a long-service certificate from the N.C.B.

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"Lochgelly Times"
21 June, 1956

A party of Russian mining engineers currently visiting the Scottish coalfield visited Bowhill Colliery. They were so highly impressed by the modern mechanised methods used at the pit bottom they requested lay-out plans of the system. The Russians were keenly interested in the plans of the colliery workings and after studying the lay-out proceeded to the pithead to witness the mechanical tipping of mine cars.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 June, 1956
Russians Visit Bowhill Colliery

A party of Russian mining engineers visited Bowhill Colliery on Monday. They were so impressed by the modern mechanised methods in use, especially at the pit bottom, that they requested lay-out plans of the system.
Mr George Mullen, N.C.B. West Fife area general manager, and Mr William Forbes, colliery manager, were kept busy answering questions through the interpreter, Mr E. V. J. Holttun, head of the Russian department of Glasgow University.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 October, 1956
West Fife Mining Developments

NEW SINKING AT BOWHILL

The new sinking at Bowhill was now down to 300 fathoms and had 140 fathoms to go. The work was actually four weeks ahead of schedule and they were now encountering some trouble because of water inflow. They had reached the strata which had caused considerable stoppages at the Rothes Colliery project, and because of the experience at Rothes they had been able to take precautions which should eliminate a repetition of the severe hold-ups there.
The aim of the development at Bowhill was to produce output to one million tons annually with a manpower of 3000; existing output is about 300,000 tons.
In order to supply sufficient electric power to meet future area requirements, an extension to the present power station was in process of building and would be commissioned this year. A boiler to burn slurry, which previously had been thrown aside, was being erected and they expected to burn 48,000 tons annually at Bowhill. Mr Mullin said that they were now exporting slurry to Western Europe at a price of about 36s per ton and at a rate of about 6000 tons monthly.
The Coal Board intended to build twenty boilers of the type installed at Bowhill, thereby releasing more saleable coal for the ordinary market. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 March, 1957
Power Plant at Bowhill
£60,000 Extension at Colliery Opened

Bowhill Colliery power station extension, costing £60,000, was opened on Thursday by Mr R. W. Parker, chairman of the Scottish Division of the National Coal Board.
Mr Parker said that it was the policy of the Board to electrify plant and equipment whenever possible. The Bowhill enterprise was a determined effort to deal with the problem of how to utilise the considerable tonnage of a very low grade fuel, slurry and filter cake, for which there was little demand.
They were not suitable commercial fuels, but with specialised plants could be used economically for the generation of electricity.
The Bowhill station would consume 45,000 tons of slurry supplied locally, and in so doing release 30,000 tons of saleable coal every year to the market.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 June, 1957
Pit Fatality

On Saturday, David Guthrie (31), 29 Hillcrest, Cowdenbeath, was electrocuted while at work at the surface power station at Bowhill Colliery. Deceased was unmarried.

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"Lochgelly Times"
1 August, 1957

Two Cardenden miners had lucky escapes from serious injury at Bowhill Colliery on Tuesday night, John Keir and Andrew Lithgow were descending number one pit when there was an overwind. The ascending cage, which was empty, overshot the pithead and the descending cage, with the two miners aboard, hit the pit bottom at speed. Both men suffered bruises and shock in the accident. Mr Lithgow was taken to Bridge of Earn Hospital for treatment but Mr Keir was allowed home after receiving medical attention at the pit.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 November, 1957
Colliery Oversman's Promotion

Mr William Bell, oversman at Bowhill Colliery, who has been appointed under-manager at Blairhall Colliery, was the guest of honour at a social function held in Bowhill Hotel, where he was met by the workers of No. 15 West and Diamond Sections in a social capacity. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 January, 1958
Pit Developments in West Fife
MODERNISATION SCHEMES ARE PLANNED

A progress report on reconstruction and modernisation schemes at several West Fife collieries, which have been estimated to involve expenditure of £10 million, has been issued by the Scottish Divisional headquarters of the National Coal Board.
The report deals with the major reconstruction projects at Valleyfield, Blairhall, Glencraig and Bowhill Collieries, and concludes by stating that the work being carried out in the West Fife area will make provision for the stabilisation of the present output position as several pits will be closed, due to exhaustion in the next few years. ...

NEW SHAFT AT BOWHILL

A new shaft is in process of being sunk at Bowhill Colliery to a depth of 440 fathoms. The shaft has now reached a depth of 360 fathoms, but progress was retarded due to encountering heavily watered whinstone for a distance of 40 fathoms and intensive ground injection had to be carried out during sinking operations. At present, an inset is being formed at the 360 fathoms horizon. When this inset is completed, shaft sinking will be resumed to the 440 fathoms horizon. A bore-hole was put down from the 360 fathom level to the 440 fathom level to prove the strata. An inset at the 440 fathom position will be made similar to the one at the 360 fathom level. Thereafter, the shaft will be furnished and coal winding commence from the 360 fathoms horizon. Concurrently, a level mine, 2000 yards long will be driven to contact the seams on the 440 fathoms horizon.
A level mine, 1300 yards long, has been driven from No. 1 Pit to connect with the 360 fathoms inset at No. 3 shaft. This mine, which passed through the same water bearing whinstone as No. 3 shaft, is now connected to the inset and will eventually be the main coal transport road at this horizon to No. 3 shaft. Work is now in progress for the formation of the 360 fathom horizon pit bottom in preparation for coal winding.
In No. 1 and 2 shafts, two low roadways, each 2000 yards long, are being driven so that output can be concentrated on the 218 fathom horizon for No. 2 pit. The aim of the project is to increase the output of the colliery from 300,000 to 1,000,000 tons per annum. The manpower complement will be 3000.
The output from the three shafts will be treated in a new preparation plant which is at present under construction. There will also be provided for common use, adequate waggon siding capacity, waggon-handling arrangements, stockyard, workshops, offices, power distribution, extension to pithead baths, lamp room, etc. Duplicate main surface fans have to be installed.
No. 2 pit steam winding engine was electrified during the July holiday period. Work has started on the extension of No. 1 winding engine house in preparation for the installation of equipment to electrify this winder during the 1958 July holiday period.
No. 1 pit steam winder has been electrified at Mary Colliery. At Kinglassie Colliery power is now being supplied from the 22 kV Kelty/Bowhill transmission line.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 May, 1958
CHEAPER POWER FOR WEST FIFE PITS
Bowhill Slurry-Burning Plant Has Proved Successful

Slurry - dust swilled from coal by water at colliery washery plant - would put out even a brightly-burning living-room fire, yet it is being burned in the Bowhill Power Station to provide one-third of the electricity used in the West Fife coalfield. ... There are modern washery plants at the Bowhill and Blairhall Collieries, but throughout all the coalfields of Britain there are vast accumulations of this valuable fuel in slurry ponds. A typical example of this is the pond at the Lindsay Colliery at Kelty.
The Bowhill and the Kelty power stations now supply the electricity used in the twenty pits, the two new sinkings, and the two training pits in the West Fife Area, and one-third of the power comes from this slurry-burning plant.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 December, 1958
Burned by Redd Bing Ashes

An excavator driver, John Yeoman, 29 Gordon Street, [Lochgelly] received burning injuries when tons of hot ash cascaded toward him while he was at work on the old redd bing at Bowhill Colliery.
Yeoman was operating an excavator on the south side of the bing, at the Wallsgreen end, when an overhanging part of the bing gave way. He jumped clear of his machine and missed most of the ash that tumbled down, but received burns on the arms. He was taken to Kirkcaldy General Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 January, 1959
750 Fewer Miners in West Fife

The overall manpower in the West Fife Area of the National Coal Board is now 14,000, showing a total reduction of 750 since the beginning of 1958. A standstill in recruitment has been maintained during the year, with the exception of Comrie and Valleyfield Collieries.
This is revealed in the annual survey of the West Fife Area, which also states that the output position at the end of November showed a reduction of 360,000 tons compared with the same period in the previous year. No Saturday working has taken place since the end of April, and all the collieries have operated on a five-day week basis. Ten per cent of the Area output is now power-loaded, and steps are being taken to increase this proportion.

ELECTRIFICATION

The survey, after reporting progress on the sinking of new shafts at Bowhill and Valleyfield Collieries, and drilling operations in the Firth of Forth near Culross, refers to other developments in the Area. A 22,000 volt inter-connecting overhead transmission line has been commissioned to provide a tie between Kelty and Bowhill power stations, and also to give a duplicate feed to Minto Colliery. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 January, 1959
Development at West Fife Collieries

Substantial progress in colliery development at Valleyfield and Bowhill are recorded in the 1958 survey of the Scottish Division of the National Coal Board.
The new No. 3 shaft at Bowhill Colliery reached 2500 feet, and an inset was formed at the 360-fathom level. The formation of the pit bottom at this level has been completed. Bowhill's output build-up will take several years, but towards the end of next year there should be a beginning of the planned expansion. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 May, 1959
Soviet Miners' Visit

This week two miners from the Soviet Union will visit Bowhill, at the invitation of the Bowhill branch of the N.U.M. They will be accompanied by an interpreter. The guests will not be union officials but two miners who work in the coal mines of the Soviet Union.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 June, 1959
Pit Fatality

William John Wishart (50), pit sinker, 95 Myreside Avenue, Kennoway, was killed by a fall of stone while at work last Friday at No. 3 pit sinking, Bowhill Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 November, 1959

... Although only two Fife pits are marked down for closure in the latest list, other collieries in the county will be affected by the Coal Board's plans for the next year. Developments at Valleyfield and Rothes will be curtailed. Pits likely to be single-shifted include Bowhill and Glencraig. Pits whose sections now producing are likely to stop include Dundonald and Lumphinnans. In two East Fife pits - Michael and Wellesley - manpower will be cut. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 March, 1960
Pipe-Major Faces Injury Handicap With Courage

Scattered all over the world are pipers who have been pupils of one of Scotland's best-known Pipe-Majors, Mr Chris Sutherland, of Bowhill Colliery Pipe Band. Yet in a few months' time he will have the job of teaching perhaps the most difficult pupil he has ever had - himself.
In December, while he was at work as a deputy in Bowhill Colliery, Mr Sutherland had his right hand on a piece of machinery when a lump of redd fell from the roof on to his forefinger. For the last three months, doctors and staff at Kirkcaldy General Hospital have tried to save this finger which means so much to a piper. Last week, however, it was found necessary to amputate the finger. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 March, 1960
35 Pit Veterans Entertained

On Saturday evening in the Auld Hoose Rooms, Bowhill Colliery Social Club held a supper and social to honour 35 members who have retired from Bowhill Colliery. Mr George Mayne presided and each of the men who had retired was presented with a cheque for £10 from the Club. The cheques were presented by the two under-managers of the colliery, Mr Tom Harrison and Mr Andrew Blake. ... The 35 men who retired were:- J. Bernard, G. Tullis, P. Aird, A. Young, A. Lightfoot, A. Wotherspoon, D. Philp, H. Miller, D. Russell, G. Reid, H. Conway, J. Carr, J. Murdoch, J. Balfour, D. Walker, W. Kenny, D. Lightbody, R. Arnold, J. McLean, W. Casey, W. Moffat, C. Justice, W. Anderson, T. Muir, G. Wallace, A. Lindsay, J. Clunie, J. Allan, R. Brown, A. Christie, A. York, B. Hooks, J. Pratt, R. Anderson, and W. Mathieson.
The Club entertained the men at supper, and during the social evening old times in the pit were recalled.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 March, 1960
Bowhill Pit Fatality

A 26-year-old Cardenden miner, John Dunn, 8 Denfield Gardens, died in an underground accident at Bowhill Colliery on Wednesday. Mr Dunn, who was unmarried, was the son of Mrs Mary Dunn and the late Mr Michael Dunn, Cardenden.
A back brusher, he was working on the day-shift in the West Diamond Section of the pit when a fall of material from the roof brought down a heavy girder.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 October, 1960
Presentations To Pit Veterans

Six retired miners, each with fifty years' service, were entertained by Bowhill Colliery Social and Welfare Club at a social gathering in the Auld Hoose Rooms on Saturday. Mr George Lamb presided and welcomed the six veterans - Messrs D. Walker, T. Swan, H. McKechnie, A. Innes, G. Davidson, and W. Mathieson. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 March 1961

Two Die In Pit Accident

A runaway bogie hurtling down a steep slope in the underground workings of Bowhill Colliery on Thursday killed two men. Another man escaped death by inches. The accident happened shortly before 7 o'clock in the morning, when the men were just starting day shift.
The men who died were Robert Muir (39), 8 Boswell Road, Lochgelly, and Richard Petrie (34), 110 Paul Street, Lochgelly. Muir, father of four, died while being rushed to hospital. Petrie, a bachelor, died in Kirkcaldy General Hospital shortly after being admitted.
Both men were material transport workers, and they were making their way to work when they were hit.
The third man, James Howie (50), 20 Woodside Terrace, Cardenden, had his leg broken, and will be in hospital for a few days. Howie had apparently heard the approach of the runaway bogie in the nick of time, but it struck his leg as he jumped clear.
Mrs Muir received word of the accident while on holiday with friends in Lancashire. She left last week for a week's holiday, and rushed home when she heard the news. They have two sons, and twin daughters aged 13. Their elder son, Andrew, is a regular with the R.A.F., stationed in Lincolnshire.

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"Lochgelly Times"
9 March 1961

Two Lochgelly Miners Killed at Bowhill Colliery

A THIRD INJURED BY RUNAWAY MINE CAR.

After a fairly long spell of accident-free mining in the local pits, Lochgelly district was stunned last Thursday morning when the news flashed round the town that two men had been killed and one injured at Bowhill Colliery.
The victims were Robert Muir (39), 8 Boswell Road, Lochgelly, and Richard Petrie (34), 110 Paul Street, Lochgelly. Both had severe injuries. Muir died on the way to Kirkcaldy General Hospital and Petrie passed away shortly after being admitted as preparations were being made for emergency treatment.

JUST STARTING THE DAYSHIFT

With James Howie (50), 20 Woodside Terrace, Cardenden, the men were making their way to work on the dayshift in the Diamond Section of the pit when a materials mine car, weighing nearly two tons, broke away.

HOWIE BRUSHED ASIDE

An electric motor loaded on the mine car gave it added momentum as it plunged down the steep slope towards the unsuspecting trio. Howie was brushed aside with a fractured right leg but his workmates were not so fortunate. It smashed into Petrie and Muir and careered on to crash into a pump engine at the end of the track.

A SPLIT-SECOND ESCAPE

Another miner had a split-second escape further up the track, and it was the mining instinct of William Halliday, 149 Dundonald Park, Dundonald, that saved him from serious injury or death.

SENSED IT WAS A RUNAWAY

Willie, aged 60, heard a rumble followed by shouting further up the slope and he sensed it was a runaway. He said afterwards - "It came thundering round a bend towards me. I could see it 20 feet away and in that split-second I flung myself sideways on to the conveyor belt. The car missed me by inches, gathering speed. As I was carried along the belt I could see it crash down on my mates. They hadn't a chance. How Howie escaped I'll never know. I didn't think anyone had a chance."

RETURNED TO THE PITS

Petrie was unmarried, but Muir leaves a widow and four of a family, including 13-year-old identical twin girls. He had previously left the pits but returned a few months ago.
Mrs Howie was allowed to visit her husband in the Kirkcaldy hospital in the afternoon and she commented - "He is lucky to be alive and escape with only a broken leg. My sympathies are with the relatives of his unfortunate workmates."

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 August, 1961
Death of Former Mine Engineer

For many years chief engineer at Bowhill Colliery, Mr David S. Muir, Newcraighall, near Musselburgh, has died at the age of 90.
Mr Muir, who left Bowhill about 15 years ago, was well known in mining circles throughout Fife during his long period of service at Bowhill Colliery. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 November, 1961
Concern Over Pit Closures
Bowhill And Rothes May Yet Be Affected

Although no Fife pits were included in the closures announced on March by the Scottish Division of the National Coal Board, there was disturbing news for the county. The fate of Rothes Colliery, one of the N.C.B.'s most modern undertakings, is "in the balance," and Bowhill Colliery, where £3,300,000 has been spent on complete reorganisation, is said to have a "doubtful future."
There is to be a cut in the labour force at Kinglassie where a pit and a surface mine work as one unit. ...

BOWHILL AND KINGLASSIE

With regard to Bowhill Colliery, where a big redevelopment was carried out after nationalisation, the Board state that they are "endeavouring to build up its output and reach a position where it will be worth while continuing. Mr Parker [Chairman of the Scottish Division of the N.C.B.] stated that he could not say what would be the outcome.
At Kinglassie, where coal was got from a surface mine and a pit working as one unit, the over-all position was to be improved by closing the surface mine. This abandonment of the upper seams would cut the working force from 600 to 400.
Rothes Colliery, which cost about £8,200,000, is to be the subject of "detailed appraisal." Within four or five months the present horizon of coal will be worked out and the Board will have decided by then whether to try to work another horizon. At its peak, Rothes employed 1100 men. Four hundred of the present 900 will be moved to other pits soon, and the remainder will await the final decision.
Dealing with the situation at Rothes Colliery, Mr Parker said there were strict limits to the information which boring could yield as to the workability of seams. From 1950 to 1956 almost continuous difficulty was experienced with water in the shafts. The water problem had limited coal working to the top horizon, about 1600 feet below the surface. Owing to geological difficulties, 14 of the 16 coal faces opened on this horizon since 1957 had had to be abandoned though they should have yielded 2500 tons daily. The operating loss of 1961, including development, was estimated at over £1,000,000. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 February, 1962
Output Of Coal Has Increased

... FIFE'S PROGRESS

At Bowhill Colliery the surface and underground reconstruction is now complete and all machinery and equipment operating satisfactorily, states the progress report for 1961 on the Fife Area of the N.C.B. In July an "Eickhoff" plate conveyor, 190 yards long, was installed in the Diamond Seam to bring coal up a gradient of 1 in 2.3.
Further mechanisation is being introduced into the colliery, and approximately 50 per cent of the output now comes from power-loading units.
The report recalls that, for reasons of efficiency and economy, the Board decided to amalgamate the former East Fife Area with the major proportion of the former West Fife Area to form a new "Fife Area."
This amalgamation took place on 1st January 1961, and throughout the past year work in amalgamating posts, departments and branches has gone ahead steadily. Substantial progress has been made.
Production for the year from 18 collieries, amounted to 3,877,000 tons as against 4,055,000 tons in 1960 - a drop of 178,000 tons. Productivity, on the other hand, rose from 21.9 cwts per manshift in 1959 to 22.5 cwts per manshift in 1961.
At Fordell Colliery last year, a mine 200 yards long was driven to the surface to improve ventilation of the Glassee district.
Fresh progress was also made with the installation of power-loading machinery in the pits in the Fife Area last year. The percentage of power-loaded tonnage increased from 47 per cent in 1960 to 56 per cent at the end of last year.
Throughout last year recruitment was maintained at a level sufficient to meet vacancies at the collieries. Where juveniles, fit for employment underground, presented themselves, all were engaged.
Vacancies arising towards the end of the year were held open at a number of pits to provide places for the men becoming redundant at Blairenbathie Mine, which was scheduled for closure by exhaustion at the end of the year.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 February, 1962
Pit Fatality

On Monday night a fatal accident occurred at Bowhill Colliery when Mr William McLaughlan (26) was struck by a steel strap on a conveyor belt, in No. 3 West Lochgelly Section. Mr McLaughlan, who resided at 176 Craigside Road, Cardenden, is survived by his widow and two of a family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 June, 1962
50 Years At Colliery

Mr David Barr, who has retired under the age limit, has been employed at Bowhill Colliery for 50 years as a miner and latterly on the surface. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 September, 1962
Killed By Fall From Roof

John Lamb (50), 102a Carden Castle Park, Cardenden, was killed in a roof fall at Bowhill Colliery on Monday evening. The fall occurred in No. 1 West Little Splint Section. Lamb was married with two of a family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 January, 1964
Effect Of Pit Closures In Fife Area

... In line with the decrease in the number of pits, the decline in numbers of non-industrial staff continued. The reduction in 1963 amounted to approximately 7 per cent.
In a report on individual collieries, the Board state that results had, on the whole, been satisfactory, and some good performances had been achieved.
Exceptions were Kinglassie and Lindsay, Kelty, both of which had been faced either with dwindling reserves or heavily faulted strata, and Bowhill. ... A recast of the new development scheme at Bowhill was followed by a rising trend in results in the early months of 1963. Several faces have experienced faulting and other geological difficulties, however, and the colliery has been unable to reach its target of output and productivity.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 February, 1964
Colliery Success In First-Aid Contest

Bowhill Colliery won the Fife Area Coal Board junior first-aid competition on Saturday and go forward to the Scottish finals in Glasgow on 29th February. Their team - James Nunn, Norman Philp, Francis O'Hagan, and Peter Gildea - scored 422 points out of a possible 500. They notched 267 points in the practical section and 155 in the transport.
In the individual contest the best No. 1 was J. Nunn. The winning team and individual winners received their awards from Mr A. M. Stewart, N.C.B. area production manager.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 May, 1964
BOWHILL'S FUTURE COULD BE GOOD

Bowhill Colliery has not fulfilled its initial expectations as one of the largest producers in West Fife, but a very great deal is left of the Colliery. Its impressive pithead buildings, which include an electricity generating station and washery, sit on top of a coalfield which has an estimated reserve of 50 million tons of good quality coal. Yet doubt about Bowhill's future is rife among its 1200-strong labour force, towards the role which this great colliery has to play in the mining industry in Fife.
This scepticism is created by the knowledge that Bowhill's target of 5000 tons a day - set when its No. 3 Shaft was sunk in 1952 - will never be fulfilled. The geology of this rich coalfield is to blame for that.
The coal is contained in a series of basins, some inverted, which results in changing gradients, very adverse to economic mining. "We cannot lay down any hard and fast rule for a gradient which changes so frequently," explained Mr James Kennedy, who took over the managership of Bowhill on 26th January of this year.
"From a mining point of view, the geology of Bowhill is poor. It is worsened by the fact that the field has not been proved. But the seams we are now working are proving the field, and we have to take steps to counter the difficulties created by nature."
The seams lie in synclines and anticlines below the vast Westfield open cast site which supplies the Lurgi coal-gasification plant. These are Lochgelly Splint and Little Splint seams which are at present being worked by the colliery at 440 fathoms below the surface. "We have to prove the geology of this basin," explained Mr Kennedy, "get to know the faults of every gradient so that we can plan the direction and lies of future faces."
Added Mr R. S. Snodgrass, Assistant Area General Manager: "Because of the geology of the pit we have more or less been forced on short-term development, working almost on a hand-to-mouth basis, and not being able to lay down a long-term plan."
"There is a big field of coal to exploit," said Mr Kennedy, "but nobody would like to say at the moment that it can be efficiently and economically worked."
The present daily output is around 1450 tons with 1270 men. The central washer employs a further 55 men, and washes coal not only for Bowhill but also for Minto Colliery and Glencraig Colliery and for several pits outwith the area.
While Mr Snodgrass could not foresee Bowhill hitting its one-time target of 5000 tons a day, it might prove an economic proposition at about 1750 tons a day with manpower at an appropriate level. "It's difficult to see its being economic at a lesser figure," he admitted, "because of the equipment put into the pit. If it could be made economic, it could have a long life."
The manager gave the assurance that the equipment was first-class from the pithead to the face. Workings were fully mechanised - coal cut by Anderson Shearers, transported by conveyor to a loading point, and from there by diesel or electric locomotives to the shaft. Its output last year was 300,000 tons.

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Mr James Kennedy

Mr James Kennedy, an Ayrshire man, who came into the Fife coalfield in 1948, was appointed manager of Bowhill Colliery on 26th January last. His knowledge of the workings and geology of the Central Fife coalfield is considerable. He came to Fife as an overman at the Aitken, moved to the Jenny Gray two years later as under-manager, and then on to Glencraig in a similar capacity in December 1953. His first managership was at Blairenbathie in 1957. In July 1959, he was appointed manager at Kinglassie, and he took over the managership of Glencraig in May 1962.

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Mr Alexander Wallace

The hazards of mining are known in a personal way by Mr Alexander Wallace, Bowhill Group Manager. Only a miracle of surgery prevented his being marked for life by an accident which befell him in the Frances Colliery in 1942. A falling steel strip struck him on the face, slicing off his nose. He was rushed to Kirkcaldy Hospital where his nose was stitched back on with such masterly skill that not even the slightest scar remains to indicate that he ever suffered a facial injury.
A Kinglassie man, Mr Wallace started his mining career in the local pit. Moving to the Frances, he was in succession there shotfirer, deputy, overman and under-manager.
His first managership was at Douglas Castle Colliery in Lanarkshire in 1949. He returned to Fife in 1954 as manager of the Minto, and three years later was made manager of the Aitken. He became group manager of the Kelty Group in 1960, took over the Lochgelly Group the following year, and in January of this year took charge of No. 4 Group, which comprises Bowhill, Glencraig and the Mary Collieries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 May, 1965
Mass Meeting Demands Delay In Pit Closures

A mass meeting in Bowhill Institute accepted a resolution on Sunday that the proposed closure of Bowhill Colliery be withdrawn until alternative industries were brought to the district. The meeting was addressed by three West Fife M.P.s, N.U.M officials, ministers of local churches and businessmen. A telling point in favour of keeping the colliery in production was put by the Chairman of Lochgelly Co-operative Society, Mr David Arthur. Recalling that 1958 had been the Society's peak year, he pointed out that, in the first six months of that year, sales had been £1,136,939. In the past six months, the sales had been £938,771, a drop of £198,000.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 May, 1965
Coal Board Decide To Axe Colliery

Bowhill Colliery, which was to have been one of the key collieries in West Fife, is to be closed. The Scottish Division of the National Coal Board gave its decision this week after a series of consultations with the National Union of Mineworkers. An assurance has been given by the Board that most of the men employed at the pit will be offered work without having to face temporary redundancy.
The pit, which was to have employed 3000 miners, was first faced with a closure threat when it was placed three years ago as a Class B Colliery, and since then problems have multiplied. Geological difficulties have made production of coal more difficult over the years, and instead of the million tons which at one time it was expected would be produced, the amount dropped to around 300,000 tons. The pit has had £3,000,000 spent in modernisation, but the Board has been losing £750,000 a year.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 February, 1967

A coal lorry and pug engine at Bowhill Colliery washer were in collision on Tuesday morning. The lorry was toppled on its side and the engine left the rails. A travelling crane lifted the lorry, belonging to Thomas Muir, merchants, Kirkcaldy, off the railway line before it could be righted. The driver, Mr John Wilson, Kirkcaldy, escaped with a severe shaking.

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Click on Image to Zoom In

Site-contributor, Peter Wishart, captured this Bowhill Colliery scene around 1986.

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"Central Fife Times"
13 April, 2000
Cairn for colliery site

Plans have been lodged for the erection of an information cairn at Bowhill Colliery Memorial Site at Jamphlars Road, Cardenden.
The plans were submitted by Cardenden and Kinglassie Community Council, c/o 5 Kinglassie Road, Cardenden.

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"Central Fife Times"
29 June, 2000
Events mark new century

June has seen several Millennium Events take place in Cardenden. An information cairn was unveiled at the Bowhill Memorial Site in the village.
The cairn gives details of the history of the colliery from its opening in 1895 to its closure in 1965. The cairn was built by Jackie Robinson and his son, Des McGovern and Willie Duncan with support from Cardenden and Kinglassie Community Council.
Bricks from the former miners' institute in the village were used for the construction, having been made in the local brickworks at the turn of the last century.
The cairn was unveiled by John Martin, the oldest ex-miner in the village. He was later presented with a plaque, depicting the information on the cairn. It is hoped people will visit the site to learn something of the history of the colliery, which was the main source of employment in the area for 70 years.

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80th Anniversary of Bowhill Disaster
Memorial Plaque Unveiled - Sunday 30th October 2011
Procession to Bowhill Ceremony followed by Service of Remembrance

At 2.30 pm, on Sunday 30th October 2011, a plaque was dedicated in the Bowhill Community Garden to the memory of the ten miners who died in the disaster of 31st October 1931 at No. Pit, Bowhill Colliery. The plaque was unveiled by 94-years-old former miner, Dow Duncan.
Following the unveiling ceremony, a procession led by a piper made its way to Bowhill Cemetery where, following a short and moving service, wreaths were laid by the Miners' Monument. Nine of the men are buried in Bowhill Cemetery. The only victim who was not interred at Bowhill was John Donaldson, whose remains were taken to his native Kingskettle.

a b c d
Click on Images to Zoom In

a:  Former Bowhill miner, Dow Duncan (94), waits patiently to unveil the memorial plaque.

b:  The memorial plaque with the names of the ten miners who perished in the 1931 disaster.

c:  Local school children with their banner wait to join the procession.

d:  The large memorial headstone in Bowhill Cemetery.

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For further information about Bowhill Colliery click here.

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